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Thread: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

  1. #21
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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by sstherockz View Post
    One more thing from my personal experience...

    I have actually booked my RC 200 bike in the month of FEB 2016 exactly after KTM has released its 2016 model pictures which features DRL lights, new tyres, etc...

    So we paid the cash in full.. KTM showroom sales manager has said me that they will be delivering the bike after registration and he didn't show us the bike as there is no stock available at the time of booking but he has shown us the model bike which is a DRL fitted one.

    So I agreed and went after 3 days to get the delivery of the bike....

    Literally I was shocked to get a 2015 model bike with not even a pinch of updates from 2016 model.

    When I asked the showroom he argued with us that this is 2016 model. So I dropped a mail to KTM India and sent all the pics containing the Chassis and Engine Number and rest of the new bike updates.

    They immediately responded and gave us a new model bike.

    So before taking delivery of your bike check for the features with the Company's website also check for the year it was manufactured..
    Hey bro, how do I check as to which year the bike is manufactured??
    sstherockz likes this.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by B7ACKTHORN View Post
    After receiving quite a number of PDI queries on numerous ownership threads, I've decided to amalgamate my experience, articles, snippets from different sources, from around the web into a single concise article, for folks who are getting their first two-wheeler. This post is not just limited to motorcycles, but should serve as a generic pointer which would help prospective buyers, get in depth perspective with respect to what to look for, how to inspect their new motorcycle. (since we are motorcycle specific and we're proud of it Just kidding.

    So what is PDI? As the title suggests, PDI stands for Pre Delivery Inspection. Though most of the times, PDI is done at the dealer level, getting to know a little bit about your motorcycle before delivery helps reduce postpartum vexation.

    So let's get at it shall we.

    Be Courteous: You know you're getting your first or new motorcycle and the feeling of excitement overwhelms all gumptions of sanity and what not. We're all into so much enthu that we head to the dealership, we want the keys, crank the engine and with accompanying wide grin, say TATA desi style and hit the streets. But unfortunately this isn't the right way to do it, you know it.

    Early Bird Catches the Prey: I always stick to the notion of heading to the dealership early, preferably broad daylight, morning and noon times. Two reasons, you can choose the bike, or if you have it pre-assigned, you can inspect other bikes and most of all you'll be the first they'd attend to 95% of the time. During this time, inspect the bike visually. Take a look around other bikes, bend, flex, turn, check how other bikes are and note down if you find anything unduly. What's unduly, we'll get to it in a moment.

    Meanwhile, you're doing that, everyone else these days have a camera, your mobile phone, try snapping some pics of the motorcycles around you and your motorcycle. Trust me, I've had this instance where one of my bike's headlamp mask had gaps , and I thought it was how it was manufactured, luckily I had a few photos of other bikes I snapped earlier which came in handy to help me find the right solution to the problem. Just keep clicking, you'll never know what you now click might click you at the right time when you least expect it.

    Never ask for opinions especially on the delivery day. Family members invited, but don't entertain the pseudo-know it all guy. I always say motorcycles and studies, you never ask anyone, go for what you feel is right, it's almost always right. Your gut instinct is the best. Trust it. But hey, safety opinions do matter, wear a helmet always.

    VIN Number: What is a VIN NUMBER? VIN defined VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER is a manufacturer's birthmark given to a motorcycle, detailing its DATE (if any) YEAR, MONTH it was manufactured. A little homework, on this helps you. VIN number on a motorcycle is almost always found near the neck or headstock (right or left) usually it's always on the right side. Usually a VIN number is almost always on the Chassis. Don't confuse this with the ENGINE NUMBER which is stamped on the engine casing. Different manufacturers have different VIN code, you can always ask your dealer to decode the VIN number if you find you're getting an older lot or if you find anything unduly.

    Here's an example of motorcycle Chassis/VIN number stamped on the headstock




    Electricals:

    It's a good idea to inspect the electric/electronic components of the vehicle, visually. Check your flashers, headlamps, horns, brake lights (both front and rear brake) Also make sure your speedo console is perfect, especially the self check, how it works, if there's anything unduly, you can always catch the issue then and there. Make sure your battery terminals are secured in the right manner. 95% of the times the battery is installed at the dealership level, and when the demand exceeds supply they do a flimsy job, loose terminals, loose mirrors, add-ons if any. Always make sure your battery terminals are tightened, remove the battery cover and inspect the terminals by slightly tugging them, it should be tight and snug, if the star screw or a nut, in the terminals dances when you do the jolting, get them tightened.

    Engine:

    Specs apart, It'd be great if you can crank the engine and rev it a little and see how it actually sounds, and let it idle for a minute or two. It is a good pointer especially, if and when you hear noises that aren't related to the engine, like loose fairing bolts/screws or anything or any rattling this is perhaps off tangent to the character of the engine. Four strokes do make slight timing chain noise, even if they're new, so don't confuse them. If you hear buzzing noise, rattling, these are all clearly discernible from the way the engine sounds.

    Peripherals/Add-ons:

    Like I stated above, make sure all the other add-ons, buzzers, mirrors, crash guards are tightened properly, all these can be easily inspected by tugging them and inspecting for any slack in bolts or unevenly torqued bolts/screws/nuts. I personally have experienced instances where my rear chain adjuster nut has fallen due to improper tightening. Talking about chain...

    Drive line/Chain:

    The most neglected part of a motorcycle during its service and upon delivery is the chain, slackness of the chain. Make sure your chain is at slack, make sure all the components, such as Chain adjusters, nuts and the related components are nice and tight (both sides) to the right slack measured in mm/inches mentioned on the swingarm and make sure it's lubed you take them out. Usually they are lubed with dry lube at the factory level, but it doesn't ask more to inspect visually, what is one of the most important elements of a motorcycle.

    Brakes:

    You know this is coming don't you! Visually check for the brake lines/hoses, check the lever play, press the levers/pedal both front and rear, feel how the brake lever/pedal tightens, if it's too spongy, you have to report it to the dealership chaps immediately. Spongy brakes are almost always a sign of air in the lines. I've never faced such issue or never heard of such issue all these years, but brakes being vital, it doesn't hurt to check them in the process.

    Usually what most guys complain is hard rear brake, yes, motorcycle disc brake pads do take some time to set in, though initially they're harder, once they bed in, they become more responsive. But again there is a reason why the front brakes are always bigger than the rear, try using front brakes, front brakes work effectively when used in tandem with the rear brake.

    Clutch lever/Accelerator Tube Play:

    Make sure you have the right clutch setting. New bikes have clutch adjusted so that they work when they just get released at the top most part of the lever throw. This isn't a problem, but that's how they are adjusted at the factory level for most of the bikes, if you feel uncomfortable at that setting, you can reduce the settings, so that you have the correct setting for your riding style.

    Accelerator tube settings are usually almost faultless, but in some cases, they do get loosened up and the play is at the extreme end, where the tube needs to be rolled in a good part to keep the revs. Make sure the throttle is slick so that when you open the throttle and let go, it must return at slick speed, if you see sticking throttle cable or a slow return or a intermittent return, get your accelerator play checked. New bike, right you don't wanna mess with the accelerator

    Tell me you didn't forget this part!

    FLUIDS!


    This is of paramount importance, be it air cooled, water cooled. This is especially important if your motorcycle has a liquid cooled motor. Check the radiator fluid, fluid in the compensation fluid tank, engine oil, brake fluid reservoirs. Usually it's at the spec 99% of the time, but since fluids are being topped at the dealer level these days, you never know what gets missed in between the lines, make sure all the recommended fluids are at their recommended levels. Helps a big deal later!

    Tires/Tyres:

    Usually these are the only thing in a new bike one can go with eyes closed, or is it? Nope! This is where tire pressure comes into play, ask your dealer to check the tire pressure. Uneven tire pressure can cause sluggish performance and especially on a new bike this can even worsen the first-buyer experience. Head to the nearest air station and get your tires topped to the right psi. Tire pressure readings are given on the left side swingarm of the bike.

    FUEL:

    Dealership guys are crude.Period. Never trust them with the fuel level, the moment your motorcycle is out head to your nearest fuel station and get it topped up. Don't trust them and go for a joy ride, and you'll be in for a bad treat. New ride, good day, you don't want that to happen, would you?

    Last part though!

    Documentation/Delivery/Warranty:

    Probably this should be included first, but we all know boring stuffs take the back seat. Make sure, you get your invoice, check the VIN number that's written in the manual and your bike are exact to spec. Apart from payment and interest rates and related papers which differ form the loaner/banker, make sure you get your insurance/temp registration number in case you pay full cash. When you pay full cash, you usually are given the insurance copy, plus the bike's all-in cost bill/receipt and the bike's manual/key paraphernalia and the temp registration details.

    Make sure you get your spare keys, usually you're given two keys with your motorcycle, make sure you get both the keys, key code card (with certain motorcycles)

    These days motorcycles come with extended warranty, for a nominal amount. I'd personally go for it, peace of mind later on just in case if things take a turn for worse. It usually is around 800 to 1000 bucks, my personal suggestion would be to opt for one.

    And do you think I'd leave you guys without the important aspect!

    Gear up! Riding gear!

    You know, you're investing your hard earned cash on a motorcycle (totally worth how much ever you spend on motorcycle but why not throw in just a teeny-tiny bit more, invest yourself with a good set of riding gears, i.e. helmets, gloves, jackets and boots. Most people think of investing on riding apparel after a motorcycle has been bought, only to later realize the credit crunch taking on them like storm. Save a few thousand bucks along with the bike's total amount, get your riding gear first and it'd help you discover a new perspective into motorcycling.

    And with that, you get your Khushiyon ki chaabi (keys to happiness)

    Enjoy your ride!

    Hope it helps!

    Cheers!
    VJ
    Bro honestly where are your legs 😍😍😍😍😘you're amazing man, I read it at the right time since I'm gonna be buying my 1st bike next month... I'll make sure I go through every single word and lines of what all you've mentioned bro.... Thanks a lot man

  3. #23
    Addicted sstherockz's Avatar
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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Anuj Agarwal View Post
    Hey bro, how do I check as to which year the bike is manufactured??
    Ok every vehicle has a unique number to them called as vehicle identification number which will be printed on the chassis of the bike.

    If it's a motorcycle the number will be printed near the forks, whereas for scooters like activa it will be under the seat.

    So to find out which year the bike is manufactured

    Here is the decode

    Vin number is of 17 characters

    The first 3 characters will represent the country code
    I guess ME is for india and A is for motorcycle
    4th character represents under which category your bike falls under

    5th character will be representing the engine size (cc)
    6th place represents the engine stroke type

    Code 4 is for 4 stroke engine

    Am not sure of 7 8 and 9th place

    10th place represents the year the bike is manufactured
    Current year 2017's code is H
    So the 10th place character should have H as it's code

    My new bike is having the code H and the bike which my dad bought last year was fitted with code G
    So am sure of this

    11th place represents place where the bike is manufactured
    And the rest 8 digits are the serial number of your motorcycle..


    Mods if anything wrong in my decode please correct here...
    Thanks
    Apache RTR 180 (The Valentine) 2012 - 2016
    RC 200 (The GRUNTER) 2016 - 2016
    CBR 250R (F.R.I.D.A.Y) 2017 - Present

    CBR Ride to Pichavaram

  4. #24
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    Post Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Anuj Agarwal View Post
    Bro honestly where are your legs 😍😍😍😍😘you're amazing man, I read it at the right time since I'm gonna be buying my 1st bike next month... I'll make sure I go through every single word and lines of what all you've mentioned bro.... Thanks a lot man
    Don't mention it. I've tried to share what I can for the community so that it helps everyone get better insight.

    Cheers!
    VJ
    Architk58 and Anuj Agarwal like this.
    Once upon a time, a guy asked a girl 'Will you marry me?'
    The girl said, 'NO!'


    And the guy lived happily ever after and rode motorcycles and watched sport on a big screen TV, went fishing and surfing, and played golf a lot, and drank beer and scotch and had tons of money in the bank and left the toilet seat up and farted whenever he wanted.


    THE END

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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Hi guys i'm getting my 2017 duke 390 getting delivered by 25th April........Any specific things i should check specific to duke other than the things mentioned in first page.....also can i demand a 0 km ODO bike.... by the way OP thanks for this thread...its a lifesaver....

  6. #26
    Moderator B7ACKTHORN's Avatar
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    Post Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by prashanth.d12 View Post
    Hi guys i'm getting my 2017 duke 390 getting delivered by 25th April........Any specific things i should check specific to duke other than the things mentioned in first page.....also can i demand a 0 km ODO bike.... by the way OP thanks for this thread...its a lifesaver....
    The important thing here is make sure, you have a handy written cheat sheet in case. We all get carried over when it comes to getting a new vehicle, and all the PDI homeowork just vanishes the moment we see the vehicle. In the case of Duke, since almost one can get to know the old ones from news ones from the livery themselves. To make sure there aren't any discrepancy with the engine itself. Try going for a test ride that heats up the engine to level that fan kicks in and turns off appropriately. Secondly, also check for any unwarranted warning lights in the console, if any just in case. Also check the engine oil level and the coolant level after the engine has heated up. Lights, indicators, tire pressure, radiator coolant and engine oil level you're all set.

    Cheers!
    VJ
    prashanth.d12 likes this.
    Once upon a time, a guy asked a girl 'Will you marry me?'
    The girl said, 'NO!'


    And the guy lived happily ever after and rode motorcycles and watched sport on a big screen TV, went fishing and surfing, and played golf a lot, and drank beer and scotch and had tons of money in the bank and left the toilet seat up and farted whenever he wanted.


    THE END

  7. #27
    Rookie prashanth.d12's Avatar
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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by B7ACKTHORN View Post
    The important thing here is make sure, you have a handy written cheat sheet in case. We all get carried over when it comes to getting a new vehicle, and all the PDI homeowork just vanishes the moment we see the vehicle. In the case of Duke, since almost one can get to know the old ones from news ones from the livery themselves. To make sure there aren't any discrepancy with the engine itself. Try going for a test ride that heats up the engine to level that fan kicks in and turns off appropriately. Secondly, also check for any unwarranted warning lights in the console, if any just in case. Also check the engine oil level and the coolant level after the engine has heated up. Lights, indicators, tire pressure, radiator coolant and engine oil level you're all set.

    Cheers!
    VJ
    Thanks @B7ACKTHORN for the useful tips...........im pretty sure they won't be giving me the bike for test ride while selecting bike from the lot atleast in the showroom I booked ......i have to check without test ride ......they were acting so wonky when I told i need to select the bike from a lot and finally agreed to it

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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Hello guys,

    Today I made the payment to Khivraj Bajaj for a Dominar!

    One thing that I did is I told them that I want to start all the bikes they have and listen to the engine sound. They had three bikes in the plum/red colour that I wanted. They agreed without any issues. When I did this simple test, it was very clear that one of these three bikes had a much smoother idling. I immediately took it for a test ride of around 2 km and noted down the chasis number upon returning. The dealership has agreed to ensure that I only get this bike.

    This test originates from around 1982-83 when my dad bought a Bajaj Super scooter. He similarly checked the idling sound of all the scooters available with the dealer and selected the one with the smoothest sounding engine, even though it had a slightly bent front fork! This scooter went on to give him a mileage in the 40s for many years - at a time when such a thing was unheard of!
    anoopkumar0 likes this.

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    Default Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Siddarth62 View Post
    Hello guys,

    Today I made the payment to Khivraj Bajaj for a Dominar!

    One thing that I did is I told them that I want to start all the bikes they have and listen to the engine sound. They had three bikes in the plum/red colour that I wanted. They agreed without any issues. When I did this simple test, it was very clear that one of these three bikes had a much smoother idling. I immediately took it for a test ride of around 2 km and noted down the chasis number upon returning. The dealership has agreed to ensure that I only get this bike.

    This test originates from around 1982-83 when my dad bought a Bajaj Super scooter. He similarly checked the idling sound of all the scooters available with the dealer and selected the one with the smoothest sounding engine, even though it had a slightly bent front fork! This scooter went on to give him a mileage in the 40s for many years - at a time when such a thing was unheard of!
    Bro where are your legs 😂😂😂😂😂 you're super crazy dude 😂

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    Talking Re: PDI (Pre Delivery Inspection) Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Siddarth62 View Post
    Hello guys,

    Today I made the payment to Khivraj Bajaj for a Dominar!

    One thing that I did is I told them that I want to start all the bikes they have and listen to the engine sound. They had three bikes in the plum/red colour that I wanted. They agreed without any issues. When I did this simple test, it was very clear that one of these three bikes had a much smoother idling. I immediately took it for a test ride of around 2 km and noted down the chasis number upon returning. The dealership has agreed to ensure that I only get this bike.

    This test originates from around 1982-83 when my dad bought a Bajaj Super scooter. He similarly checked the idling sound of all the scooters available with the dealer and selected the one with the smoothest sounding engine, even though it had a slightly bent front fork! This scooter went on to give him a mileage in the 40s for many years - at a time when such a thing was unheard of!

    Congrats on your new bike. I also did similar to what you said. But didn't take it for a spin. Was shown two bikes. Started both. One started and gave a good smooth Idling. The Other one didn't even started. First impression is important Know? Selected the Smooth Idling one. Today is the registration.


    I am taking my White Dominar from Khivraj Mount road today. I

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