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Thread: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

  1. #21
    Rusted itsmevini123's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Quote Originally Posted by pranjal chakraborty View Post
    Hi @abhimanyu31

    I am interested to get similar Tank Pad. Can you get me a reliable source?
    Who would not be interested bro...

    Waiting for more update...
    KTM RC390 - Current
    Yamaha R15 v2 - Sold
    Hero Hunk - Sold
    An IT Engineer by profession and a rider by soul.


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  2. #22
    Rusted abhimanyu31's Avatar
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    Default Installation of Spiegler Stainless Steel Brake Lines

    Installation of Spiegler Stainless Steel Brake Lines


    One the things that becomes most apparent to change is the rubber brake lines on the bike. Its not that Kawasaki is not aware of the benefits of steel braided brake lines as the same are being used by Kawasaki in many of their more expensive bikes including the ZX 6 and ZX 10. The only reason that Kawasaki did not use steel braided brake lines is to save on input cost. Personally, I feel its a bit of a let down that Kawasaki has chosen to use rubber hoses on a bike which it considers to be a premium bike for India. Kawasaki has been very clear about its marketing strategy for India. They are not looking at mass numbers and have chosen to work on the premium category. This strategy is quite apparent from the introduction of the Ninja 300 for 2013 when Kawasaki had the choice to introduce its smaller sibling the revamped Ninja 250. While we are lucky that we have got the very latest product almost as soon as it was launched in U.S. and Europe, it just feels that Kawasaki could have taken care of a few things that would have aligned the Ninja 300 with its premium marketing strategy. The feeling is even more deepened when one looks at Bajajs and KTMs offerings which while being much lower priced offer steel brake lines. Somehow one feels that Kawasaki missed a trick out here for the sake of saving couple of thousand bucks to transform Ninja 300s good brakes in to great ones.


    The saving grace of the whole thing was that while I would be able to upgrade the performance of the brakes substantially, it was also an opportunity to add some farkle to the Ninja.


    Spiegler Brake Lines


    I have been using HEL steel braided lines on my R15 for more than 3 years now and been very happy with the performance, though for some reason the lower piston in the caliper keeps seizing like regular clock work for some reason. My friends in U.K. swear by HEL brake lines. I was about to order a set of them when I asked my self if there could be something better than these lines out there. So I started looking for something that performed as well as HEL lines and looked far better. While discussing the issue with a friend from U.S. he pointed me in the direction of Spiegler. According to him these lines were just what I was looking for.


    So took a look at Spieglers website to know more about them. I was impressed with what I found on the website. The a few unique things that Spiegler offers which set it apart from other aftermarket brake lines. The first is an adjustable banjo, which can be rotated 360 degrees, what Spiegler calls as fitting torsion system to eliminate line twist. Apparently Spiegler has patented the system. The lines are also offered in 12 colours and all fitments such as banjo and banjo bolts are offered in 9 colours. That gives one a choice of 108 combinations. From the looks of the photos of the website, the finish of the lines looked superb. Each kit is made to order and you need to select the colour combination while ordering the kit. The lines are DOT approved and are Dupont Teflon lined inner construction for smooth and even hydraulic pressure through the entire brake line and eliminate line expansion. Spiegler claims that due its unique method of building these lines, they weigh 30% less than other steel braided lines.
    To know more about these lines take a look at their website Spiegler Performance Parts - Why Spiegler Brake Lines?.


    I went ahead and ordered red lines with red banjo and banjo nuts. I thought that red would look great with my white Ninja 300 (though my sister will beg to differ; she calls me Jughead for my liking for blues and reds ).


    I received the lines recently and was looking forward to installing the same. I was also looking forward to upgrading the brake oil by switching over DOT 5.1. I asked Vikram of Motozone if he could source the same. Vikram tried to source the DOT 5.1. oil, however the same is not readily available and needs to be ordered. After 2 frustrating weeks where we even got in touch with the official Motul distributors we took the decision to go for DOT 4 oil and change over to DOT 5.1 as soon as it becomes available (we have ordered it and expect to received within a month).


    Incidentally, Spiegler recommends Motul brake fluid for its lines.


    Installation


    As is always the case, Vikram called me on a Friday afternoon to inform me that I could bring the bike and lines and he would take care of all the other things. He ordered the Motul DOT 4 fluid. In addition to the brake fluid, he ordered couple of cans of Motul Carburetor Cleaner to clean all the brake parts and internals. According to Vikram in absence of dedicated Brake Cleaner, the Carburetor Cleaner is best of cleaning all the internal components brake system. He is absolutely against use of solvents like petrol, kerosene, etc., as in his experience these solvents distort the rubber parts. He also informed me that he intended to dismantle the whole brake system and clean it before putting it all together.


    Motul DOT 3 & 4 fully synthetic brake fluid.
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    Motul Carbu Clean
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    Vikram started the dismantling by removing the front brake system. He first removed the caliper from its mounting. The brake pads were removed.
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    I would like to comment on the brake pads at this point. Many people have complained about the quality of brake pads and how they wear out abnormally fast. My bike has completed 3,000 kms and the pads were nearing the end of their service life. The maximum that these pads could last were 500 kms more. So yes, there is a problem with these pads. They do seem to have a very short life span. Surprising as the make is Nissin and not some cheap second rate company.

    Once the pads were out, Vikram pumped the brake lever to push the caliper pistons out.
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    Once the pistons were out of the caliper, Vikram cleaned them with the carb spray.
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    After spraying and cleaning the pistons, they were dried with fresh clean tissue paper and then warped in clean tissue paper and put aside in a box to move on to the next step.
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    After cleaning the pistons, Vikram remounted the caliper on the fork. This allows for easier dismantling of the brake line. He loosened the brake line and removed the bleed nipple.
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    The brake line was loosened from the master cylinder side.
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    The master cylinder and oil reservoir were removed from the handle bar.
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    The cap was removed from the oil reservoir and residual oil was drained out.
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    The piston was removed from the master cylinder and cleaned with carb spray.
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    The master cylinder and oil reservoir were cleaned and dried.
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    The calliper was cleaned with the carb spray.
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    The master cylinder was reassembled.
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    The calliper was reassembled.
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    Spiegler line was installed.
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    DOT 4 oil was poured into the oil reservoir and the brake was bled.
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    Vikram noted the remarkable easy with which the oil flowed from top to the brake calliper and bleed nipple. The Teflon lining does help the hydraulic fluid flow smoothly. Once the front brake was completed, the procedure was repeated for the rear brake.
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    Once again thanks to Vikram of Motozone Pune, Mumbai, for making the whole experience a painless one. Motozone has taken really good care of my Ninja .
    prateek2210, sibun, SWAYAN and 7 others like this.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  3. #23
    Rusted abhimanyu31's Avatar
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    Default Driven Racing D3 Grips: Limited Edition Candy Red.

    This week's mod was installing Driven Racing D3 Grips: Limited Edition Candy Red.

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    ----consecutive posts auto-merged-----

    Installation of Exhaust Wraps on Ninja 300

    This week's mod for the Ninja 300 was installation of exhaust wraps. Exhaust wraps are simple and relatively cheap mod which in theory work on a simple proposition i.e. keep the exhaust gases heated till they pass out of the exhaust system. This proposition works in several ways to improve the performance of the bike. By insulating the exhaust pipes including the headers, mid section and the end, the exhaust gases are not allowed to cool as they pass through the system. As the exhaust gases are hot, their density is less, thus allowing the gases to travel faster through the exhaust system. As the speed of the exhaust gases is higher, there is better scavenging of the combustion chamber. Due to the better scavenging effect, the fresh charge fills the combustion chamber more efficiently. At another level, as the heat front the exhaust gases is not being allowed to radiate out throughout the exhaust pipes all the areas in the vicinity of the exhaust pipes routing run cooler thereby promoting a cooler running engine.

    Another benefit is a smoother running bike and mellowed sounding exhaust note. In a non-warped exhaust system the rapidly cooling gases make the exhaust pipes resonate. Exhaust wraps dampen this effect of resonance created by not allowing the gases to cool rapidly and also as the wraps are warped tightly around exhaust pipes they help reduce the resonance physically.

    Exhaust warps are not without their associated controversies. There have been reported cases of cracked header pipes and blown engines due to change in the AFR due to faster flowing exhaust gases. There have also been reported problems with the changing metallurgy of the exhaust pipes making them brittle due to the 'unnatural' heating - cooling cycle. Another problem reportedly is that moisture gets trapped under the warps and causes the exhaust to rust.

    With all of these pros and cons in mind, I was in a dilemma on whether I should wrap the exhaust or not. I decided to consult a friend in U.K. The friend owns a very heavily tricked out Yamaha R1. It is a well-known fact that Yamaha R1 is an extremely uncomfortable bike to ride in traffic. Almost all owners of the bike will complain about the heat the bike generates when its just standing. One of the primary causes for this heat is the cat con that is situated directly under the rider's seat due to the routing of the exhaust. One of the first things that most R1 owners in U.K. do is to remove the cat con and wrap the exhaust with exhaust wrap. I asked my friend if I should go for the same. His answer was that I should go for it.

    I still had a lot of doubts and was in two minds about the whole thing. I asked Vikram of Motozone on how we should proceed further on this issue. He assured me that he has done a number of such installations and he has not faced any of the associated problems that I was apprehensive about. As part of my background work, I wrote to Kerry of AreaP to inquire if I would need a new fuel map if I installed the exhaust wraps. According to him, there was no need for a fuel map.

    I once again discussed the pros and cons with Vikram to understand the subject fully. I finally made up my mind to install the wraps with the idea that I would use them for couple of weeks and see the result. If it didnt work out I could always remove them. I asked Vikram if he would make arrangements for the wraps and once again he assured me to just bring the bike in and he would take care of everything.

    Installation
    The installation was pretty straightforward. The exhaust was completely dismounted to enable easier installation. Over here I would like to note that when we uninstalled the exhaust system we were very surprised to see how clean the system was. There was almost no hint of any carbon deposits and the system is almost as clean as the day it was first installed. I have completed 1,000 kms on system and state of the exhaust is an indicator of the spot on fueling of the AreaP/ Fuel Moto Fuel Controller. Unfortunately, I have not taken any photographs of the same.

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    Initial Impression
    The first thing that one notices is the mellowed down tone of the exhaust. Its not a drawback; on the contrary it sounds richer and smoother than before. Put the bike in gear and the first impression is the absence of any vibration on the foot pegs. The bike revs even more rapidly than before and does not heat up as much as before. The smoothnes is so deceiving that at speeds of 100 kmph you need to look down at the speedo to realise the speed one is clocking. Added bonus is that the bike looks really rough and ready to enter the ring like a boxer.

    The wraps do give out a lot of smoke due to moisture, which according to Vikram will subside and disappear within couple of days of running. The heat will cure the wraps and remove all the moisture.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  4. #24
    Rusted abhimanyu31's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driven Racing D3 Grips: Limited Edition Candy Red.

    Brembo Marchesini Wheels and Metzeler Sportec M5 Interact

    After a brief hiatus I am back to working on my bike. After finishing the first phase of changes I took some time off to simply enjoy the ride and also plan for the next phase of changes. This brief pause allowed me to better understand the changes made and also based on the results, identify and plan for the next set of changes. It is very tempting to be a bull in the china shop and try to change everything at one go. This can lead you astray very quickly. One of the key ingredients to successful and satisfying upgrades is to identify the right changes to make and also to understand the pros and cons and the tradeoffs that the changes will entail.

    Newtons Second Law of Motion

    F = MA or Force = Mass times Acceleration

    Quite simply put, Acceleration is produced when a Force acts on a Mass (Object). The greater the Mass of the Object, the greater Force required to Accelerate the Object.

    The above-mentioned law is the fundamental pillar on which all performance upgrades are based. This law is inviolable in this universe (may be different in a parallel universe but then no one has gone to a parallel universe to confirm it ).

    Considering the above law there are essentially only two choices to increasing acceleration i.e. increase the force applied or decrease the mass of the object.

    Brembo Marchesini Wheels

    A set of aftermarket wheels was always on my mind. However, this particular change was not contemplated in the near future and was always thought of as something over the horizon. Even before I started with the first set of changes I had remarked to Vikram of Motozone that one day we will need to do after market wheels maybe even BST carbon fiber ones. Having experienced Marchesini Magnesium alloys on a R1, I was in no doubt whatsoever about the benefits of a pair of lightweight after market wheels. While reducing the weight by a few grams on any other part of the bike may not make much noticeable difference, reduction of even 500 grams in wheels will have a significant and profound change. Not only is weight being remove from un-sprung weight category, it also being reduced from spinning mass where the effect of the said weight gets magnified greatly. It also falls perfectly in line with Newtons second law of motion.

    While contemplating the next set of changes, one evening Vikram gave me a call informing me that he had come across a pair of Brembo Marchesini wheels. My first reaction was to ask him if it could be used with the stock tire sizes. His answer was negative, we would have to upsize the tire sizes to make use of these rim. He also told me that they were not a direct fit on the Ninja 300. My initial reaction to the proposal was negative. The first thought that ran through my mind was that bigger tires mean more weight, which would certainly not help my quest for performance.

    However, the seed had been planted in my mind and the more I thought about it the more I was convinced that a set of aftermarket wheels was something that I needed to do sooner rather than later. During my research on the subject I found that the smallest size of rear wheel from any of the aftermarket players was suitable for a 150 tyre and there was nothing for the stock size of 140. So it seemed that there was no choice but to upsize the tyre to make this change possible.

    During one of my meetings with Vikram, he showed me the Brembo Marchesini wheels. The first thing that one notices was really remarkably light the wheels were. I discussed my apprehensions with Vikram about upsizing the wheels. The quality and finish is exquisite. Vikram assured me that even with upsize tyres these wheels would weigh significantly less than stock. He also assured me that the quality and accuracy of the fitment of these wheels will be better than stock. Every parameter and alignment would be measured and zeroed in. The estimated time given for the work was one week.

    Metzeler Sportec M5 Interact

    As mentioned earlier, my first choice would have been not to fool around with the size of tyre and retain the stock tyre dimensions. However, if we wanted to use the Brembo wheels we need to upsize the tyre. The stock rim is 4 inches in breath, which supports a 140 tyre. However, the Brembo rear wheel was 5.5 inches in breath and the minimum tyre size needed to be 150. Upsizing a tyre one size from the stock is easy, but this seemingly simple change has repercussions that seems to take many by surprise.

    My first choice for tyres would have been Bridgestone Battlax tyres. I informed Vikram that the same would be my first choice. Vikram started looking out for the Bridgestone tyres. However, wherever he inquired it the quote for a pair tyre was above Rs. 30,000/-. He suggested Metzeler M5, which were about Rs. 17,000/- for a pair. Considering that the Metzelers were Z rated steel belted dual compound tyres this was definitely a good VFM proposition.
    This brings us to the issue of the size of tyres. As mentioned earlier changing a tyre size affects the bike in surprising ways.

    Let us consider the stock tyre sizes;
    Front: 110/70/17, which is 110 mm is the breath of the tyre, 70% is aspect ratio (height) of the tyre and 17 inch is the wheel size on which this tyre will fit. Similarly rear is: 140/70/17.

    What is interesting is the height of the tyres. The calculation of the height of stock tyres is as follows:
    Front: 70% (aspect ratio) of 110mm (width of tyre) = 77mm.
    Rear: 70% (aspect ratio) of 140 mm (width of tyre) = 98 mm.

    Thus there is a difference of 21 mm between both tyre heights. This 21 mm difference is quite a crucial number. The difference is quite intentional on the part of Kawasaki engineers and it has implications in steering geometry, weight distribution between front and rear of the bike and the overall handling of the bike. In order to maintain the handling characteristics of the bike it is extremely crucial that the new tyres are able to maintain this height difference or come as close to this number as possible.

    Considering the above, while a M5 tyre was available in stock size (110/70/17) for the front, the rear tyre 150 mm tyre was not available in 70% aspect ratio. The rear size was available only in 60% aspect ratio and below.

    Therefore, if we had considered a front 110/70/17 and a rear 150/60/17, we would have the front tyre height at 77mm and the rear 90mm. The difference in height would have been 13mm instead of the original 21mm. This 8mm change would have a profound impact on the handling of the bike as it is lower at the rear than front. This changes the weight distribution and steering geometry, which effect handling adversely.

    Thus, we had no choice but to go for a 120/60/17 in the front and a 150/60/17 in the rear. The height for these tyres was 72mm (front) and 90mm (rear), which translate to a difference of 18mm. This was as close we were getting to the magic figure of 21mm as possible with the tyre sizes. While there would be some effect on the handling, it would not be as pronounced. The residual difference will need to be dialed out when we upgrade the suspension (planned for near future). For now we were going to have to live with the difference that 3mm is going to make.

    Using lower aspect ratio tyres has couple of other effects that change the overall ride experience. The first one is the quality of ride. Due to lower aspect ratio the ride is not as smooth as stock. The ride will be bit harsh and will one seemingly will feel every imperfection that is present on the road.

    The other problem in using the above mentioned upsized tyres is the difference in the rolling circumference of the tyre. The stock rear tyre (140/70/17) has a rolling circumference of 1972mm whereas the new tyre (150/60/17) will have a reduced circumference of 1922mm. This difference of 50mm has 2 outcomes. The first is that the bike will show a higher indicated speed than the actual speed. In other words, the speed error will increase. The second and more important is the reduction in top speed by about 4 kms.

    We plan to conduct a few runs with a Gtech data logger find out what is the actual speed error.

    To correct the first problem we will need to install a speedo healer in the future. To correct the second problem we will need to play around with the final gearing.
    Having considered all the pros and cons mentioned above we decided to install Metzeler 120/60/17 and 150/60/17 tyres on the Brembo Marchesini wheels.

    Installation of Brembo Marchesini Wheels and Metzeler Sportec M5 Interact

    As promised by Vikram, the installation of the wheels and tyres was completed in a week. Vikram ensured that all the parameters were measured and zeroed in during installation. Its very interesting to note the values that he came up with while measuring the stock fitting. It seems that the alignment of the front and rear sprocket was out by 2mm, which would in turn lead to premature wear of the chain and sprockets and also add to some amount of vibration and transmission loss. The front caliper alignment was also found to be out by 0.3 mm which once corrected has led to improved breaking by leaps and bounds. The front caliper now feels like a four pot caliper instead of a 2 pot. Similarly, a whole host of parameters were found to be having deviations. Such deviations are part and parcel of production-based vehicles.

    Attention to such details is the key to successful changes and enhanced experience. And kudos to Vikram and Motozone for paying attention to such details.

    Before completing the final installation the stock wheels with tyres and the Brembo wheels with Metzeler tyres were weighed in on a digital scale. The results were surprising if not astounding to say the least:
    Stock Front (with IRC tyre): 10.4 kgs.
    Stock Rear (with IRC tyre): 16.3 kgs.
    Brembo Front (with Metzeler tyre): 8.6 kgs.
    Brembo Rear (with Metzeler tyre): 12.6 kgs

    A total weight reduction of 5.5 kgs was far beyond our expectation. I am sure that Newtons Second Law of Motion would be happy with our offering of tribute and would reward us with better acceleration .

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    A wheel being weighed.

    Reduction of un-sprung mass is not without its cons. By reducing the un-sprung mass we have upset the rebound settings of the suspension as tuned by Kawasaki engineers. On a superbike this change is fairly easy to correct due to the availability of fully adjustable suspensions. However, the Ninja 300 does not have adjustable suspension and thus it is now fait accompli that we will have to upgrade the suspension. We have identified the after-market suspension components and will be doing the changes in near future.

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    Front Wheel

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    Brembo Logo on spoke

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    Rear Wheel

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    Note the hollow hub...Drastic weight reduction

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    The finished bike

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    Rear

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    Front

    Ride On Tire Protection System.

    The final thing that needed to be done was to balance the tyres. I have used Ride On TPS on my bikes for the past couple of years and have been very happy with the performance. Inserting the solution is 2 minutes job literally and a drive of 3 to 4 kilometers coats the tyres with the solution and balances them without any fuss. Once the process is completed, the tyres are balanced for their lifetime. The solution is so effective that the metal counter weights on your wheels can be removed without any adverse effect.

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    Ride On TPS

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    Acknowledgements:
    Once again thanks to Vikram and Vijay of Motozone Pune, Mumbai for their brilliant work.
    Also thanks to @satyenpoojary for pointing me in the direction of Ride On TPS. Its been one of the best tips I ever got.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  5. #25
    Addicted vikundefined's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Hi , i am hooked to your thread and really like the cutomizing that you have done.
    If you don't mind can you also share the cost involved in these upgrades.
    Thanks



    Ride or die

  6. #26
    Rusted abhimanyu31's Avatar
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    Default Rizoma Garffio LED Indicator lights

    Rizoma Garffio LED Indicator lights

    This weekend's addition to the Ninja was a bit of farkle. Rizoma Garffio LED Indicator lights not only look stunning, but also provide clear and intense light for turn indication. The indicators comprise of housing made of aluminium with clear lens and SMD based LED. Made in Italy, each indicator comes in individual box with a sponge cut out packing and is accompanied with 2 sets of resistors and a instruction manual.

    The installation of these indicators is not blot on. It required making of mounting plates. As I wanted to use the stock connectors and did not want any cutting and splicing of the wiring, fresh connectors were sourced, the wires were soldered and the assembly was shrink warped with PVC sleeves. Thanks to Vikram of Motozone, Pune, for taking the effort and time to do the job exactly as I required it to be done. It is in no small part due to Vikram's efforts that the whole experience was so painless.

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    prateek2210, shv18, rylan and 7 others like this.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  7. #27
    Rusted itsmevini123's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rizoma Garffio LED Indicator lights

    Great Stuff, love reading all the installation, keep them coming...
    KTM RC390 - Current
    Yamaha R15 v2 - Sold
    Hero Hunk - Sold
    An IT Engineer by profession and a rider by soul.


    Delhi to Sach Pass - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/3...h-ka-darr.html
    Delhi to Mana - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/2...xperience.html
    Delhi to Munsyari - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/2...ttrakhand.html
    Spiti circuit - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/3...cuit-solo.html

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  8. #28
    Rusted abhimanyu31's Avatar
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    Default Renthal Rear Sprocket, Vortex Front Sproket and Rolon X Ring Chain

    Renthal Rear Sprocket, Vortex Front Sproket and Rolon X Ring Chain

    My quest for performance is taking me down roads that continue to surprise and delight me. The changes made over the past 9 months have brought about some real performance improvements. The bike now makes about 5 hp and 1 lbs/ft torque more than the stock bike and weighs about 15 kgs less.
    This increase in performance has led to some interesting issues to crop up. In this write up we will be dealing with one of those issues. The increase in power is pretty much useless if it cannot be put to the tarmac in an optimized way. When the gearing is kept stock and power increases, the direct and immediate result is better acceleration. However, there are other potential benefits that drop to the wayside if required changes are not made to take advantage of the opportunities offered by the power increase.

    It quickly became apparent that the increase in power and torque had made the stock gearing, which was perfectly suited for the stock power band, under geared. In the top gear the bike felt like it still had 1 or 2 more gears to go. It was difficult to hold the bike in first gear in traffic, the pull and torque made the bike a hand full and one quickly learnt that its best to shift to 2nd gear as soon as possible. Even the second gear felt as if its the first gear. On the road this resulted under gearing makes the bike feel like a tractor rather than the smooth performance machine it is as such. The increase power and torque are being wasted in the lower gears. The problem was further compounded by the use of 150/60/17 rear tyre, which has rolling circumference of 1922 mm vs. stock of 1972 mm.

    Use of the above mentioned tyre decreases the speed attained at any given rpm. For example, at 11,000 rpm the stock tyre will attain a speed of 164 kmph in top gear. With the new tyre this drops to 160 kmph. Also the fuel efficiency drops marginally.

    So what is the solution? The solution is obviously to change the gearing to ensure that bike becomes more street friendly and the increase torque can be used to in a more liner way. Due to the extra power now available, changing the gearing will also allow the bike to attain higher speeds at lower rpm thereby giving a better fuel efficiency.

    On the face of it, the solution is quite simple; play around with the gearing till you get the right combination for the right results. There are plenty of options available for front and rear sprockets for Ninja 300. However, there was just one problem; it seems that I had dug myself into a hole by installing the Brembo Marchesini wheels. These wheels do not use stock sprocket fittings and hence has a different sprocket.

    Hence, special sprockets that will fit this wheel needed to be sourced. I discussed the issue with Vikram of Motozone and after careful consideration and some calculations we narrowed our choices down to reducing the rear sprocket teeth by 1 or 2 to 41 or 40. This change would spread out the torque and make the bike more street manageable at the same time it would also compensate for decreased rolling circumference. After much consideration we came to conclusion that that its best to start step by step, therefore 41 teeth rear sprocket was decided upon.

    Now started the hunt for sprocket, which would fit, on the wheel. The search turned out to be an exercise in frustration and patience. A sprocket with 41 teeth for the wheel turned out to be elusive. None of the makers of aftermarket sprockets such as Vortex, Renthal, Driven, seemed to list one with 41 teeth. For some strange reason all of them where listing a rear sprocket of 40 and below or 42 above. After a lot of frustrating searching, Vijay of Motozone finally found a 41 teeth Renthal sprocket. An order was quickly placed for the same.

    A week after placing the order we received the rear sprocket. The first thing that all of us commented on was the finish of the sprocket. It is exquisite. The next thing that all of us remarked on was how light of the sprocket was. The sprocket is so light that it feels like its made of cardboard.

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    Once we took a look at the rear sprocket, the scope of work was dramatically increased. Instead of just installing the rear sprocket we decided to replace and renew the entire drive train. To get maximum benefit we decided to a new chain and front sprocket.

    Vikram of Motozone sourced a Vortex 14 teeth Stainless Steel front sprocket. For the chain we decided to use Rolon X ring chain.

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    We started to work by removing the rear wheel. The current rear sprocket is made out of mild steel. It weighs more than 500 gms whereas the Renthal sprocket is about 100 gms. This was change was going to reduce another 400 gms of un-sprung weight from the machine.

    Changing the chain and sprockets requires a lot of patience, as the swing arm needs to be removed in order to facilitate the removal and installation of the chain.

    The first impressions after the change are dramatic. Now the torque is well spread out across the range and the bike is once again extremely smooth and streetable.

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    The mild steel sprocket.

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    Renthal sprocket being installed on the wheel. A perfect fit.

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    Front stock sprocket. Note the speedo sensor that picks its signal from the front sprocket nut.

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    Rolon X ring chain.

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    Vortex Stainless Steel front sprocket 14 teeth. Note the gunk that gets collected below the front sprocket with regular lubing.

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    The gunk being cleaned thoroughly before final assembly.

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    Front sprocket and chain ready for final assembly.

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    Rear Sprocket and chain ready for final assembly.

    A very special thanks to Vikram and Vijay of Motozone, Pune for the efforts taken by them to source the parts.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  9. #29
    o.O razr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Damn cool stuff, dude. You're doing an amazing job on Ninja san.. Helmets off..

    Sent from the deep reaches of hell

  10. #30
    Rusted abhimanyu31's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Installation of Scottoiler chain oiling system

    The one common complaint of all motorcyclists around the world is the hassle and routine of cleaning and lubricating their bike’s chain. It has be the most dirty and crappy part of all the their bike maintenance routine. I have personally come across motorcyclists who have based their choice of bikes on the basis of what the final drive train of their bike is i.e. shaft drive or belt drive, because they don’t want to deal with cleaning and lubing a chain.

    What most people tend to forget or discount is the fact that the final drive is what makes it possible for our bikes to move. Without a final drive train, the bike may as well be a pushbike. Yet we tend not to pay it the attention that we pay to the engine or any other part of the bike. We think and discuss about what oil is the best for the engine, what air filter to use, which spark plug to use, etc, but chains and sprockets are only given a passing thought. Even when group of motorcyclists meet, it is more likely that engines will be discussed than the final drive train.

    The only time that most of us give the drive train any thought is when the chain becomes slack or it starts making noise.

    Many people complain that their gear shifts are notchy, many complain that they don’t get proper fuel efficiency and many complain that their bikes don’t perform as well as their friends does, many still complain about their bike not being smooth where as the neighbor’s is. Most people start looking at various factors (admittedly valid reasons) like air filter, AFR, tyre pressure, clutch adjustment, etc., only in the passing is the word ‘chain’ mentioned.

    In addition to the above problems most people complain that the chains and sprockets wear out abnormally fast after the first 3,000 to 4,000 kms of running.

    Would it surprise you if I told you that chains and sprockets have as much role to play in the above problems, as any other factor has to play? Many a times, the problem may be just that, a chain that has not been lubed properly which in turn leads to friction between the dry ‘O’ and links. Once the ‘O’ cracks and losses integrity, it lets in dirt and grime, which destroy the chain and this, leads to creation abnormal pressure point in the sprocket. These abnormal pressure points lead to wearing of the sprockets.

    When chains are discussed, it’s normally about which chain is superior, the ‘O’ ring, the ‘X’ ring or the ‘Z’ ring. To an extent the bike makers and the chain makers are to be blamed for the obsession for such discussions as they provide either very basic information such as recommended cleaning period and what chain lube and cleaner should be used to misleading advertisements that harp about how one chain is superior to its competitors.

    In my quest for performance I started looking for ways in which to reduce friction and increase the amount of useable power available at the rear wheel. The surprising road that it took me down was sprockets and chains. My last post was about installation of the Renthal rear sprocket, Vortex front sprocket and a Rolon X ring chain. The gearing change allowed for better use of the power. However, there was one crucial aspect that we still need to address; how to ensure that the chain and sprockets deliver optimum power all the time?

    While researching this aspect, a friend in U.K. pointed me in the direction of Scottoiler chain oiling systems. He was emphatic about the benefits of the new Scottoiler eSystem and asked me to consider it seriously.

    We all know in some part of our mind that a dry chain degrades performance. But the question is just how much of degradation it is? According to Scottoiler, the friction between a dry ‘O’ ring and the links can covert up to 2 Kilowatts (2.6 hp) of power to heat. A look at dyno runs provided by Scottoiler proves to be a very interesting read. The dyno runs done with a GSXR 1000 show a difference of 10 bhp at the rear wheel between a lubed and a dry chain. For additional study take a look at the more detailed pdf http://www.webbikeworld.com/t2/bmw-s...est-graphs.pdf.

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    In addition to the performance, there are additional benefits of the system:

    1. It claims to increase chain and sprocket life by up to 7 times.

    2. It eliminates the need to clean the chain frequently. The oil from the system washes away the dirt and grime.

    3. Its hands down more economical to use than traditional chain lubes and cleaners. The accurate metering system ensures that the chain optimally lubed. 60 ml (capacity of reservoir) of oil last for 4,500 kms.

    4. Its cleaner that traditional chain lubes. Traditional chain lubes are tacky to ensure that lube sticks to the chain. However, over time the lube collects dirt and gets flung on to the rear wheel. All of us know that cleaning the rear wheel of grime and dirt is a major headache and is very messy.

    The above mentioned benefits made it worthwhile to go for it. Therefore, a Scottoiler eSystem was ordered.

    When the Scottoiler system was received, I immediately saw a potential problem. The system consisted of a digital console, which needs to be mounted in place easily reachable. The digital console consisted of a 3-axis accelerometer, which senses how much oil should be dispensed. It also displays the rate of oil dispensation, ambient temperature, time, oil level in reservoir and the G forces. The console has 2 big buttons to help operate the unit even with gloves on.
    The potential problem that I foresaw was the habit of people here to fiddle around and destroy things, which don’t belong to them. Some may feel offended by this statement, but it is a fact that I have personally experienced, there is a streak of meanness and jealousy in people who take sadistic pleasure in destroying things that belong to others. Leaving the bike unattended with the display console mounted was akin to showing red to a ranging bull.

    I asked Vikram of Motozone, Pune, if he could make a casing for the console. Vikram very graciously agreed to make the casing. The results of Vikram’s efforts have exceeded my expectations. He created the casing using aluminum with a polycarbonate front and 2 rubberized buttons. The complete casing is waterproof, tamper resistant and completely functional.

    The eSystem box consist of the digital console, oil reservoir, 250 ml bottle of oil lubricant (you have a choice of blue (regular) and red (high temperature) oil), harnesses, nozzle with pipe, and various fixtures for mounting options. The kit is quite self-contained and ordinarily would not require any thing extra for installation.

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    Scottoiler eSystem – California Superbike School approved. MCN Product of the Year 2009.

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    eSystem digital console in the aluminum casing. 100% water proof and temper resistant.

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    60ml eSystem oil reservoir with a electro magnetic piston to dispense accurate amount of oil.

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    250ml high temperature oil. One bottle will last 18,000 kms!
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    eSystem reservoir being filled.
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    Oil reservoir bottle sits in the glove box next to the tool kit.
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    eSystem being primed.
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    Oil filling the entire piping during system priming.
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    Oil dispensing nozzle.
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    Pipe routing. Note that the system priming is completed and the pipe is completely filled with oil.
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    Display console in regular display mode.

    300 kms/ One week ride review

    300 kms and one week have given a better understanding about the Scottoiler system. To answer all queries in one line: It works exactly as advertised. The system’s 3 axis accelerometer is sensitive enough that it will wake up only when the engine is started and the bike is in motion. While waiting in traffic, the system sensing that there is no motion goes to sleep only to awake immediately upon moving 5 meters. The current threshold for oil dispensing is set at 60 kmph (it can be adjusted to higher or lower threshold), therefore lubrication begins only after the bike reaches and passes 60 kmph. The current oil dispensing rate is set at 60 seconds for 1 drop of oil, this again can be increased or decreased in units of 10 seconds.

    Ordinarily, after 300 kms of running, one would see some amount of grime collected on the chain. Thus far the chain is remarkably clean. The chain and the sprocket are well lubricated and show remarkably reduced rolling resistance. This difference is felt perceptibly when the bike is on the move. Gearshifts are positive and butter smooth, there is remarkable absence of vibration on the foot pegs.

    This is one of the most remarkable and best investments I have made and will be a must do addition on all my future bikes.

    Note: BMW and KTM officially endorse Scottoiler for their bikes.

    Thanks to Vikram of Motozone, Pune for the fantastic job of making the casing and also doing a great job on installation of the system.

    Monsoon
    Experience.

    I have now completed almost 4,000 kms with the Scottoiler system which includes about 750 kms in monsoon. The benefits of the system are quite apparent. I do not need to clean the chain and lube it every 500 kms (more frequently in the monsoon). I also do not have to clean the rear wheel and swing arm as frequently. With the chain lube, there would always be a thick coating of dirt and slime on the rear wheel rim after some riding due to the tacky nature of chain lubes. This would be even worst in the monsoons. Now there is only a thin layer of oil and grime, that can be wiped away with mild soap and water. Even after heavy rains on last week when the bike was left standing outside in the rain, the chain has enough lubrication on it not to allow any rust to develop on the chain.

    Also since the installation, I have not adjusted the chain even once. The chain tension is the same as it was during installation. It runs like a new chain, is smooth and chain noise is virtually non existent.

    8,000 Kms Experience

    Just crossed 8,000 kms with the Scottoiler. The chain is still as good as new. Have not had to make any adjustments till date. Bike still rolls as freely as it did on the day the chain was installed. Sprockets are also as good as new, show no signs of wear till date.
    Last edited by abhimanyu31; 03-11-2015 at 05:29 PM.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

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