Since '02 xBhp is different things to different people. From a close knit national community of bikers to India's only motorcycling lifestyle magazine and a place to make like minded biker friends. We have one common religion - Bikeism.

T-shirt
Magazine
Castrol Power 1

Tubeless tyres are better than tubed ones.

Our Partners



User Tag List

Page 64 of 65 FirstFirst ... 1454606162636465 LastLast
Results 631 to 640 of 643
Like Tree1662Likes

Thread: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

  1. #631
    psr
    psr is offline
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CHENNAI , TAMILNADU
    Posts
    5,796
    Mentioned
    673 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by siva23 View Post
    Thanks Shivang ; Its been quite busy week and i have great news !! Finally I have bought my stallion. The Name Transfer and RTO took horrendous experience.
    I have taken the same bike which i asked for the suggestion above. The bike has been serviced periodically with Ananda Honda ASC bangalore and the odo is 16k. I am planning to go ahead to Shell ultra FS on next oil change with FZ oil filter. or probably should I go with shell HEDO treatment , need your thoughts on it.
    I have few questions
    > there is oil leakage on the engine head cover and its covered with oil quite well , i have checked the oil level for 500 kms its didnt decrease , will the head gasket replacement fix it or something to worry about ?
    > when i slamm front disc @80kmph , i feel the front end drops very stiffly and i have feeling its pulling one side , even during the turings the handle bar is not holding correctly, i can feel something wrong in the cone alignment . should we need to inspect the cone set, ball bearings and free flow of the handle bar left and right.

    only these 2 things are haunting me, else apart from that its an unbelievable and amazing machine, i feel like glazing over the air @ 100kmph and its one of the best experience i am getting on this state of art machine.there is no shim,valve,chain tensioner noise from the engine bay. few screeching noise from the left side fairing ,will inspect for any fittings on next service.
    once again thanks Shivang and psr sir, without this thread i wouldn't have got this beast and i am so happy and learning from this bible like Ekalavya
    Congrats on your Bike . Did you find from the previous owner regarding the head oil leak ? as to from when it had started ?
    That said if the oil level is not coming down and engine is good , there will not be much to worry. Please try to get a clear picture of the leak and post it here so that we can get a clear idea..It could be gasket, or it may also be the head nuts becoming slightly loose due to use( though rare).
    Try to use the Shell Rimula for the next 4,000 Kms or at least two changes to ensure a cleaner inside which will reduce vibrations and difficult gear shifts...You would have seen how SHV18 had to use it multiple time to get a cleaner engine ,since the previous owner had not been good at maintenance...Of course now he uses it for upto 3K + since it is doing quite well in his engine.. Shv 18 will be able to give a better perspective .
    Good Luck
    When Was The Last Time,You Did Something For The First Time.

  2. #632
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Hosur
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by psr View Post
    Congrats on your Bike . Did you find from the previous owner regarding the head oil leak ? as to from when it had started ?
    That said if the oil level is not coming down and engine is good , there will not be much to worry. Please try to get a clear picture of the leak and post it here so that we can get a clear idea..It could be gasket, or it may also be the head nuts becoming slightly loose due to use( though rare).
    Try to use the Shell Rimula for the next 4,000 Kms or at least two changes to ensure a cleaner inside which will reduce vibrations and difficult gear shifts...You would have seen how SHV18 had to use it multiple time to get a cleaner engine ,since the previous owner had not been good at maintenance...Of course now he uses it for upto 3K + since it is doing quite well in his engine.. Shv 18 will be able to give a better perspective .
    Good Luck
    psr ji Vanakkam, thanks for youre time on helping me.sure I will go with rimula on next oil change and this weekend going to buy wire and battery clips for the earth wire mod & sae 40 for chain lube.and regarding the oil leak I am attaching the pictures of engine head cover from both sides.Please have a look and let me know.
    Sir, i am staying in Hosur Tamilnadu, and everyday commuting to electronic city around 50 km up and down.
    enjoying the ride and trying to practice rev-matching while downshifting , buts i am not able to do it properly , i need more time to learn it.
    Regarding the cone-set steering issue, i lifted towards a side with side stand and checked the handle by moving either side, it was freely moving both sides without any jerk or tight. I aslo checked the second way, hold the front disc and shaked the bike front and back , i am not able to find any jerk or movement on the clip ons.
    but still i get weird feeling when turning towards right side, its not smooth turning its gives me jerks and pulls aside.not sure why i am feeling heavy at front. or its that i am not used to this heavier bikes since i am coming from pulsar.

    thanks
    siva
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    psr likes this.

  3. #633
    psr
    psr is offline
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CHENNAI , TAMILNADU
    Posts
    5,796
    Mentioned
    673 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by siva23 View Post
    psr ji Vanakkam, thanks for youre time on helping me.sure I will go with rimula on next oil change and this weekend going to buy wire and battery clips for the earth wire mod & sae 40 for chain lube.and regarding the oil leak I am attaching the pictures of engine head cover from both sides.Please have a look and let me know.
    Sir, i am staying in Hosur Tamilnadu, and everyday commuting to electronic city around 50 km up and down.
    enjoying the ride and trying to practice rev-matching while downshifting , buts i am not able to do it properly , i need more time to learn it.
    Regarding the cone-set steering issue, i lifted towards a side with side stand and checked the handle by moving either side, it was freely moving both sides without any jerk or tight. I aslo checked the second way, hold the front disc and shaked the bike front and back , i am not able to find any jerk or movement on the clip ons.
    but still i get weird feeling when turning towards right side, its not smooth turning its gives me jerks and pulls aside.not sure why i am feeling heavy at front. or its that i am not used to this heavier bikes since i am coming from pulsar.

    thanks
    siva
    Looks like Your top head gasket is leaking, ...so it is not a complicated fix....ASC or mech must open the top head and then change the gasket. It is better done with ASC, and you can run with it without issue as long as the oil level is maintained....you can also try tightening the head bolts a little to see if it had worked loose due to vibration over a period of time..
    When the steering stem balls bite into the racers, due to tight fixing , or due to running through pot holes regularly,it forms small dimples which will restrict and make steering notchy and sometimes wavy handling through a curve. So try changing the stem (cone set) bearing with the holding racers first..change the fork oil in both forks and fill ONLY upto recommended level.
    Good Luck.
    When Was The Last Time,You Did Something For The First Time.

  4. #634
    Rusted shv18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The North East-India
    Posts
    1,882
    Mentioned
    162 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by siva23 View Post
    Thanks Shivang ; Its been quite busy week and i have great news !! Finally I have bought my stallion. The Name Transfer and RTO took horrendous experience.
    I have taken the same bike which i asked for the suggestion above. The bike has been serviced periodically with Ananda Honda ASC bangalore and the odo is 16k. I am planning to go ahead to Shell ultra FS on next oil change with FZ oil filter. or probably should I go with shell HEDO treatment , need your thoughts on it.
    I have few questions
    > there is oil leakage on the engine head cover and its covered with oil quite well , i have checked the oil level for 500 kms its didnt decrease , will the head gasket replacement fix it or something to worry about ?
    > when i slamm front disc @80kmph , i feel the front end drops very stiffly and i have feeling its pulling one side , even during the turings the handle bar is not holding correctly, i can feel something wrong in the cone alignment . should we need to inspect the cone set, ball bearings and free flow of the handle bar left and right.

    only these 2 things are haunting me, else apart from that its an unbelievable and amazing machine, i feel like glazing over the air @ 100kmph and its one of the best experience i am getting on this state of art machine.there is no shim,valve,chain tensioner noise from the engine bay. few screeching noise from the left side fairing ,will inspect for any fittings on next service.
    once again thanks Shivang and psr sir, without this thread i wouldn't have got this beast and i am so happy and learning from this bible like Ekalavya

    Attaching the pic.
    Hi buddy,
    my sincere apologies... have been caught up with personal life and commitments so not been able to check out nor update this thread... a long post is due.

    I believe @psr sir has already covered a lot of details pertaining to solving issues related to your new vehicle.

    Coming back to the issues you have mentioned, here are my observations:

    1) The oil leak, the indication is clear that the top head cover rubber gasket is leaking. It is a simple fix, i believe i have shared the picture and the cost of the part along with the part no. somewhere in one of the posts on this thread. Changing/replacing the same will stop the leakage for good.

    2) I believe it has been mentioned on this thread that once in two years or about 15,000 kms one should ideally take out the old fork oil, get the innards of the front fork cleaned and fresh oil should be poured in. This will drastically improve the handling and fork dive by a greater margin. Though bear in mind: stock fork set up is designed to be bit on the softer side which aids in better bump absorption on our moon cratered roads.

    3) If the handlebar is veering towards one direction than one of the possibilities - steering head coneset is on its way out. The whole OEM unit will cost approx 2300-3000 (inclusive of labour cost at SVC). I would also recommend inspecting the front tire bearings and the front tire itself for uneven wear.

    Hope this helps..

    Cheers,
    Last edited by shv18; 05-22-2018 at 08:16 PM.
    psr likes this.
    A quote by a toilet, " use me well, keep me clean, i would never tell anybody whatever i have seen.." :P

  5. #635
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    chennai
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Icon10 Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by Iam_Hoodi_CBR View Post
    Your fan relay is faulty, replace that and issue will be resolved. Do it sooner else disconnect the battery to stop the fan running.

    Ram
    Replace the fan ???

  6. #636
    psr
    psr is offline
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CHENNAI , TAMILNADU
    Posts
    5,796
    Mentioned
    673 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by sidhuasg View Post
    Replace the fan ???
    I believe Mr.Ram had explicitly said " Your fan relay is faulty, replace that and issue will be resolved. Do it sooner else disconnect the battery to stop the fan running " which means FAN RELAY IS FAULTY and NOT THE FAN. Please read all of the words clearly and understand to prevent Confusion.
    sidhuasg likes this.
    When Was The Last Time,You Did Something For The First Time.

  7. #637
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    chennai
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Got it thank you !!!!

  8. #638
    Rusted shv18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The North East-India
    Posts
    1,882
    Mentioned
    162 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Hi All,

    been a while since, i have posted something. I guess once a vacation comes to an end and the regular life schedule starts all over again, one tends to get immersed in it and lose sense of time. This post has been pending for over a month so i do apologise for a late update but i hope the readers will understand my situation. As mentioned earlier this particular trip was going to be more or less the last long distance tour i would do on my Honda CBR 250R "Little bird". It was my way of spending one last unique and amazing experience with her while she is still with me. The following log will be broken down into two sections:

    1) Covering the journey and experience: little bit more elaborate to share my experience with the readers and break apart from the standard write ups done so far on this thread.

    2) The Aftermath: The surprise, the tantrums, troubleshooting, new discoveries, tips & tricks.

    I do apologise in advance if i get carried away with my story, prolonging it too far and "really boring!!" category... But if you want to go through this, a tub of popcorn and hot cuppa tea/coffee is recommended!

    So without further ado let us begin..

    BHUTAN: THE TRIP & THE RIDE

    As for those members who have been following this thread since page 1, the usual prep was done and the first 500 kms of ride to Guwahati city from my place of stay was initiated. Since it was pretty much uneventful owing to me doing this same route many times over so no pictures nor details will be elaborated. She was performing brilliantly as she always does so i had no complaints. But just about 40 kms before entering Guwahati, i was lashed on by heavy rainfall, dirt and muck attack flung over by oncoming and vehicles ahead of me which made the ride pretty engaging and challenging rather. The helmet visor would get clogged up with dirt and mud deposits = zero visibility due to which i had to stop and clean the visor only to find that in a matter of few kms the process had to be repeated all over again!

    Nonetheless, i did notice that while leaning my CBR, it was becoming a bit skittish which confirmed my suspicion that thanks to incessant torture sessions i had taken the street tires through - Michelin Pilot Street Radials, they had lost a significant chunk of rubber grooves which disperse the water off quickly and aid in traction when riding on wet surface. However, having said that, it doesn't mean they were in the range of being uncontrollable or something but still just a hint given off by the tire that it is reaching its last stages soon. In spite of the rains, i reached Guwahati rather quickly and took a break for about 2-3 days in order to catch up with my family and friends. Thanks to the thorough mud and dirt bath she had taken en route, i felt guilty of keeping her like this so the services of a close by Car & bike washing shop was pressed into action. I wanted her to look neat and clean before the commencement of the journey to Bhutan.





    Pic 1 & 2: CBR getting a proper wash before the commencement of the trip from Guwahati to Phuentsholing, Bhutan.

    This time i was joined by a friend of mine who was equally interested in exploring Bhutan and experience the people and the culture of this unique little country. Thanks to my previous little stint with Bhutan last year (2017), the roads were known to me and so was the route. Thus, it made everything a lot easier for us to do the ride to Phuentsholing without getting lost or stopping here and there to ask for directions. In a matter of 6.5 hours, we were on the way to Phuentsholing while enjoying the beautiful view offered by Hashimara tea estate in West Bengal. I was happy to note that my CBR was giving a decent FE of 37-38 kmpl given the relaxed pace me and my riding buddy kept throughout the journey to our destination for Day 1.





    Pic 3 & 4: Hashimara Tea Estate en route while heading towards Phuentsholing, Bhutan.

    Me and my fellow rider buddy had decided the following itinerary to explore Bhutan while being on a budget which included:

    Day 1 (22/04/18) - Ride from Guwahati - Phuentsholing and stay overnight.

    Day 2 (23/04/18) - Get permits, local Tashicell Sim card and reach Thimpu

    Day 3 (24/04/18) - Stay in Thimpu

    Day 4 (25/04/18) - Ride from Thimpu to Dochula Pass and stay over

    Day 5 (26/04/18) - Ride to Punakha and head to Paro

    Day 6 (27/04/18) - Stay in Paro and explore

    Day 7 (28/04/18) - Head to Chelela Pass and return to Paro

    Day 8 (29/04/18) - Return journey from Paro all the way to Guwahati

    Since my earlier experience with the procedures in immigration and the headache of running around to get the permits for personnel and vehicle was pretty much seared into my brain - i knew that keeping all the photocopies of the required documents with you well in advance goes long way in reducing wastage of time and possibly leaving early from Phuentsholing to reach the capital city: Thimpu. Last time when i was there, thanks to heavy rush and me not knowing the application process, it was quite an arduous task to finish everything and get the required permits. However, as luck would have little did we know that the story will repeat itself all over again!

    On 20th April, 2018 - Bhutan had conducted local council elections: during which all Govt. offices including immigration were closed. The Bhutanese officials has also closed the border entry gates which led to a major log jam and chaos all over. On 20th And 21st it was an official govt. holiday - so a combination of 3 days of closure of immigration office meant that on "D" day - Monday of 23rd April, 2018 (the day we were going to apply for our respective permits) there was tsunami of people waiting in cue to get the entry permits issued from the immigration office. Even with all the documents in hand, we had to wait for nearly about 4 hours for the permits to be issued. After that we made a dash to the RSTA (Road Safety & Transport Authority) office. Again due to procedural delays by the time the vehicle permits were issued, sim cards and getting the luggage loaded onto our respective motorcycles it was 4:00 pm (IST) so we both knew that we are not going to arrive in Thimpu before 8:30 - 9:30 pm. Again since, my last visit to Thimpu was done all in darkness and alone, i was fairly more confident of tackling the high altitude narrow roads leading to Thimpu city. Incidentally, i had also brought in my bluetooth intercom system which was installed on both of our respective helmets which made communicating and pair riding really easy especially when riding in the dark. It enabled us to be in touch even if for some reason one rider had gone ahead by say 900+ mtrs. I would highly recommend getting hold of bluetooth intercom units to any rider planning to go on touring or long highway rides in general.

    Anyways, by the time we had entered Thimpu city and managed to locate our hotel, it was already 9:30 pm. We quickly unloaded our luggage and then went out to grab a quick meal then after a bit of goofing around we finally crashed.

    THIMPU CITY, BHUTAN

    The next day was pretty relaxing for us. As required by the Immigration Department of Bhutan - if one wishes to travel beyond Thimpu and Paro (the permits till Thimpu and Paro only are issued at Phuentsholing) one will have to visit the immigration office at Thimpu, present a photocopy of the permit (earlier issued in Phuentsholing) and come back after an hour or so to collect the extension permit. In our case, we needed extension of our permit to Dochula Pass - Punakha. Since, we were going to stay one more night in Thimpu, we reached the permit office by 10:30 am (BST) and gave the requisite documents to the officials. We were asked to come after 1.30 hours so in order to spend time and have a good breakfast, we thanked the officials for their help and then went out to experience Thimpu city by foot. I must point out that as per the requirement, one is also supposed to get an extension of vehicle permit for Dochula Pass and Punakha from RSTA in Thimpu. However, in our case we managed to find a very humble officer in RSTA Phuentsholing who on request issued us vehicle permit to visit Punakha as well which made the whole process a bit more easy for us two.





    Pic 5 & 6: Condition of typical tourers after entering hotel late at night. We stayed over at Hotel Taktsang in Thimpu.

    Since, i had been to Thimpu before it was fun to be a guide for my fellow rider buddy explaining the road, building, the city life, food, people and culture: i felt like a make shift tour guide . Compared to last year i noticed a lot more buildings coming up in Thimpu city. I hope that the people of Bhutan are able to maintain the natural beauty of this city without turning it into a complete concrete jungle like what we have done to our earlier beautiful hill stations in India. This harmony is very important if Bhutan wants to keep happiness and cleanliness over commercialisation. To me, i can never ever get tired of the traffic policemen in Bhutan who are there at the respective junctions, monitor, assist and guide the vehicular traffic movement accordingly. There are more or less no traffic signals in Bhutan, nobody honks anywhere in this country unless absolutely necessary. This makes it a far more pleasant experience for everybody. I hope to someday us all back in India will at least try it out once... trust me it makes riding or driving a far more pleasurable.









    Pic 7 - 10: The beautiful commercial capital of Bhutan - Thimpu City. Sincere and diligent traffic police doing their job like clockwork.

    All this walking around had gotten our stomachs rumbling so it was time for us to do "Pet Puja" . We first visited a small shop called "Laphing" which specialised in preparing traditional vegan dishes and the menu looked very appetising. However, the shop had not opened yet so we were back - out on the street to look for more options. Incidentally, i remembered one small joint i had visited last year which was located near the main clock tower in Thimpu city and the food i had tasted then was delicious. I remembered the exact location of the shop but i had forgotten the name. After a little bit of searching around, we managed to find the place - "Foodlover restaurent". The owner: Mr. Kelzang Fintsho was an absolute treat to interact with and the food was still as delicious as it was the last time i had stepped into this restaurent. I decided to try out the traditional Tibetan - Bhutia dish 'Momo with Sha' which was out of this world. My friend took a bite from my plate and then just took over till i had no choice but to order for one more plate! I don't know why but i kept on profusely thanking Mr. Phuntsho for the wonderful hospitality and the sumptuous meal we had over there.

    After our breakfast, we then moved on to get our extended permits from the immigration office and further explore the city. My family members were constantly pestering me to get hold of some collectables from Bhutan so i finally relented and picked up stuff from a local Gift shop. It was really nice to interact with the shop keepers here in Thimpu. Everybody is polite and nice and even if you don't buy anything they smile back at you and ask you to visit their shop again. I don't know if there is any marketing involved or people are just plainly simple over here but it is really a good experience for any visitor to witness it.

    So far Thimpu was a great place for us two riders to be in as we ended up interacting and making friends with local riders who were equally passionate and keen to visit India and experience it by riding all the way from Bhutan. We were humbled by their hospitality and repeated request to join them to explore the unknown in Bhutan the next time we pay a visit over there. It was really nice to see local Bhutanese people wearing their traditional dresses in pride which is commendable.





















    Pic 11 - 20: Small vegetarian food joint called Laphing. We then visited Foodlover restaurent where true to its brand name, it is for a 'food lover' as the food is simply out of this world. Picked up some mementos from a gift shop and we were out back exploring the city.

    We went out in the evening as well and enjoyed the night city life and then ended our day. The next day since, we did have the necessary permits and the distance from Thimpu to Dochula Eco Retreat Resort (our next drop point) was only about 20 kms, we took it easy and strolled around and picked up some more collectables from Govt. approved handloom shops in Thimpu main market area. We came back to our hotel @ 12:30 pm (BST), brought our luggage down and were in the process of getting them mounted onto to motorcycle when the manager - owner of the hotel Taktsang - Mr. Ugyen Tshering came out and interacted with us. It turned out that he was a motorcycle enthusiast too and one thing led to another: We kept on chatting till we figured out that time had flown and now it was 2:30 pm. So we bid farewell to Mr. Tshering and went on with the ride to Dochula Pass.

    AT DOCHULA PASS & DOCHULA ECO RETREAT-RESORT

    The route to Dochula Pass from Thimpu is really very beautiful. Being at an altitude of 10,000 ft one will notice the ambient temperature dropping very quickly to single digit so good warm winter gear is highly recommended. Since, i had the Alpinestars Drystar Andes jacket with me, riding to Dochula pass even while we were ascending, i was feeling fairly warm and comfortable. We managed to reach Dochula Pass rather quickly and from the Dochula Chorten our resort was barely 300 mtrs ahead. When we checked in as luck would have it the owner of the resort: Mr. Karma Phuntsho was also there. He came forward and introduced himself and then the typical me, we went on having a nice interactive discussion with him for over and hour. Since, today was again going to be a very relaxed day for us, we took out own sweet time, got the luggage out and requested the staff to take us to our room for the night. I guess Mr. Phuntsho instructed his staff to take care of us and take care of us they did!! The room was just plush and royale! We were taken aback by the simplicity and beauty of the hotel and the room itself. Of course, by the time we were busy admiring the wooden craftsmanship of the room and the resort, the temperatures had dropped to 3' C. So as it happens, a nice fire place along with a good cup of tea and conversations was a good starter for us all. Mr. Phuntsho and the staff were kind enough to make out stay very pleasurable and relaxing to the extent me and my friend promised each other that we will be back here again but this time we shall spend two nights instead of one and just have a gala time over here. If any of the riders/travellers are planning for a trip to Bhutan, i highly recommend Dochula Eco Retreat resort. The view itself is worth all the money!

    I don't know why but for some weird reason i am drawn to the mountains. They make me feel puny, make me get a true sense of the power and might of mother nature - we are nobody but just a tiny spec in this universe. And the experience of riding to Dochula pass nonetheless made our day even better! Everywhere we looked, the view was simply breathtaking. We were told by the Mr. Phuntsho that on a clear day one can easily see the snow capped mountain ranges of the Himalayas right from the resort but i guess if one looks are the pictures below, the weather had some other plans. But nonetheless we simply kept on exploring in and around the resort.



























    Pic 21 - 33: At Dochula Pass and Dochula Eco Retreat resort. polite and helpful staff and a humble owner. Truly a unique place to experience peace and harmony and ofcourse amazing fire place!! A must stay for any crazy tourer or rider planning to visit Bhutan.

    TO PUNAKHA & PUNAKHA DZONG

    The next day we were a little lazy and left from the hotel for Punakha at around 9:45 a.m. (BST) Since, Punakha was only about 40-45 kms from Dochula, we had requested the staff and owner to kindly allow us to keep the luggage at the reception counter so that we can go there, explore and can come back and then ride back to Paro. The roads have been recently worked upon by BRO (Border Roads Organisation maintains and constructs fresh roads in Bhutan thanks to very special relationship both the countries share since many decades) so it was butter smooth and every corner we took, the view was simply serene and unique. We were awestruck throughout the ride and decided to slow down to sedate pace instead of going for a corner carving session. By the time we had reached Punakha Dzong, we had dropped down to quite an altitude to naturally the ambient temperature had gone up so when we reached at the parking lot of Punakha Dzong, the ambient temperature had soared to 32'C so one can imagine how cooked i felt inside A Stars Andes riding jacket which has been designed purely for fall and winter weather. I guess i don't have to spend much time blabbering as the pictures below will give the readers an idea about what me and my riding buddy experienced over there. The Punakha Dzong is simply an amazing manmade marvel! From any direction one looks at the structure, one simply can't help but wonder how in the world somebody managed to construct it and how has it been able to withstand the test of time all this while for over many centuries? The constant prayers of the buddhist monks reverberating inside the Dzong was something else.. trust me when i tell you this - when inside the Dzong, one feels the clock has gone backwards and there is nothing but peace and calmness around you.

    Even though both of us were sweating profusely, we simply couldn't stop admiring what we saw with our own eyes. The trees blooming with flowers while the river flowed by gently - made us feel spiritual and totally lost. We both stayed there for over an hour till the hot weather made it unbearable and we decided to head back to Dochula resort and then continue riding to Paro.



























    Pic 34 - 46: Enroute Dochula to Punakha Dzong. the pictures speak more than million words of how beautiful Bhutan truly is! Punakha Dzong is indeed a architecture marvel and looks magnificent!

    We rode back to our resort, collected our luggage and then decided to halt at Dochula Chorten. We stayed there for about an hour or so and then started riding towards Paro. Now that both me and my friend had tasted the mountain roads of Bhutan, we both were fairly comfortable and confident while going through innumerable corners while ascending and descending through the topography. Enroute, we were bathed with a thunderstorm which along with high strong winds was something that we both didn't expect at all. For the first time i experienced my motorcycle oscillating from left to right on its own without any rider input all thanks to the crazy crosswinds we faced for a fair bit. After crossing the bridge, we then moved into Paro Dzongkha and were about 19 kms away from the town and again mother nature showed us her beauty all over again. It seems everywhere you go, from one mountain to another mountain there is no other way for one but to stop and take pictures, try and absorb what one was seeing - it cannot be expressed in words rather one has to be here to see and feel it while being in Bhutan!

    Our respective motorcycles were working just fine however as expected, being a carbureted bike, my friend's Apache RTR was gasping for breath and misfiring at times whereas being a closed loop EFI my "littlebird" was working just fine. FE was still hovering happily around 37-38 kmpl which considering the mountainous region we were in was well within acceptable range. We had to be a little bit careful on the corners though as out of nowhere there will be little stones and pebbles probably chiseled off from the mountain top by the weather which may lead to your bike's rear braking traction if the lean angle is too much. So we kept our corner carving sessions to the minimal and took the safe course of riding which turned out to be far more better experience.







    Pic 47 - 49: At Dochula Chorten. Then while enroute Paro after crossing the bridge, we saw the beauty of the mountains completely changing to something unique. Me and my "littlebird" enjoying the view.

    We then finally entered Paro and then my friend just couldn't help himself and forced me to stop in every 1 km. He had to take pictures every now and then as for him it was something he never expected he would get to see! The river, the trees, snow capped mountains, the sunlight playing around with the clouds: it all became too much for my friend!! We finally managed to reach our hotel in Paro, changed to regular clothing and then went around exploring the small town. Without a doubt if somebody asks me to compare out of Thimpu and Paro, which one i would rate to be better: for me it would always be Paro. This place has a very unique beauty to it which i have not seen anywhere else in Bhutan or may be i simply sound or may be i am biased towards Paro!! But nonetheless the 3 nights we had planned to stay in this beautiful place, we both had decided to make the best out of it!

    This place at night looks even better, with the lights highlighting the beauty of the monasteries in and around, one simply can't help but get awestruck by it! The food and stay is comparatively expensive in Paro in my experience but since me and my friend had planned for it i guess we were good for the remainder of days. We did try out the local Bhutanese cuisine by the amount of Chilli used was far too much for our delicate stomachs to process so we raised our white flag, claimed defeat and requested the restaurent owners to kindly tone down the chillies by a bit..











    Pic 50 - 54: The ever beautiful Paro. Without a doubt this is one of my favourite places to be in.

    My rider buddy was insisting on going for a ride to Chelela Pass which is one of the highest motorable pass in the country. So the next day we were ready for it. The good thing about Chelela Pass is that it is only located about 35-40 kms away from Paro and navigating to it isn't a difficult affair. So the next day, we got up early and then started out ride to the famous pass of Bhutan.

    CHELELA PASS

    As one leaves Paro and starts taking the twisties and sharp turns of the road leading to Chelela Pass, the route goes through dense natural forest and wild flowers blooming here and there all by themselves. Every corner was a treat to our eyes as we clock on the kms with our respective motorcycles. We were greeted with a bit of rain, mist, lot of fog, a bit of sun and then clouds coming over and claiming the land. At certain places we found BRO contractors working tirelessly to patch up certain bad section while laying fresh tarmac on the other. From what we could gather, during winters, this mountain range being at a higher altitude, witnesses snowfall and probably the snow itself damages the road every year just like it might be the case in Spiti valley or Ladakh.

    After a lazy paced riding of almost an hour, we reached the Chelela Top which is at an altitude of 13,084 ft pretty much similar to Sela Pass in Arunachal Pradesh (though Sela pass is at a higher altitude of 13,700 ft). The temperature dropped to 0 - 1'C and we could feel the cold wind the moment we took off our gloves. I guess this was not the season otherwise we were told one usually finds snow at Chelela Top. We spent sometime over there and then started our return journey to Paro.













    Pic 55 - 60: Road leading to Chelela Pass and Haa Valley. Beautiful wild flowers and coniferous trees. It is common to see Buddhist prayer flags almost everywhere in Bhutan and they look beautiful. The weather was bone chilling but no snowfall had occurred.

    When we were about to enter Paro, on to our right the Paro international airport looked amazing. We had to stop and take a picture of the same. By the time we had reached our hotel both of us were happy and a little bit sad knowing full well that tomorrow the return journey to "same 'old same 'old" city life had to be done. Both were not exactly looking forward to it but alas life can't be all cream cheese, sugar & spice and everything nice right? We went out in the evening and had a nice meal with a local Bhutanese couple who were kind enough to accommodate us and also managed to get hold of fresh and pure butter from a local dairy farm (trust me every branded butter in India will tumble down the stairs when compared to the fresh tasty treat one gets when using local butter from Bhutan). Paro is famous for its red rice which when served in front of you: the smell of it is simply more than enough to make your mouth start salivating. Both of us were not hesitant to try out any and every kind of dishes that were presented to us and by the end of it we both were stuffed to our neck!



    Pic 61: The beautiful Paro International Airport.

    The next day, we both got up very early (4:30 a.m. IST) knowing full well that today it was going to be one heck of a journey all the way back to Guwahati. All-in-all we were going ride about 560 kms: from mountains to plains and from beautiful cold weather to sweaty and sticky one something which was far more discouraging than the distance itself!! Since, we had tanked up the night before, the first pit stop for fuelling was planned at Phuentsholing. We both knew that since, it was going to be all downhill we may witness a very good fuel economy considering little or no amount of throttle input was needed while our decent is on. It took us about 3.6 hours to reach Phuentsholing (approx 178 kms). When we stopped at the petrol pump and filled up our bikes, i was in for a total shock: my bike refused to drink more than 3 - 3.2 ltrs which roughly translate to 47.8 - 48 kmpl!! i knew i was going to get a good FE but 48kmpl by far was the highest FE i have ever recorded on my Honda CBR 250R! Surprisingly my friend's Apache RTR gave a lesser FE. I guess modern EFI engines consume little or no fuel when going downhill with the throttle in closed position. But it was no time to wait and gloat about it so we left for Guwahati city immediately.

    The ride from thereon was pretty much uneventful. It took us about 9.5 hours to enter Guwahati city. Enroute we found plenty of riders either heading to Guwahati or coming from Guwahati to Sikkim/Bhutan - not sure but was happy to see so many like minded riders going to explore this magnificent country on their own. With this we came to an end of our trip of 8 days. Once, we entered the city, me and my buddy bid our good byes and i left for my house. Even though my friend's trip was officially over, for me it was still going to be another 500 kms of ride from Guwahati to my place of stay which by now had become fairly boring. I guess one can understand my position especially when one has to go through the same road over and over again for every piece of adventure one takes in. But nonetheless, i shall cherish this trip forever with my ever reliable "littlebird".

    So in the end was it a fairy tale and a fair ending? NOPE NOT AT ALL!! It seems my Honda CBR 250R still had a few tricks up her sleeve... On my return leg of journey she gave me a few surprises and moments of headache too but i guess it is enough for now. We shall carry the second part of the story in another post. Do stick around as the story so far will take an interesting twist!!

    Until then...


    Cheers,
    Last edited by shv18; 06-15-2018 at 10:26 PM.
    A quote by a toilet, " use me well, keep me clean, i would never tell anybody whatever i have seen.." :P

  9. #639
    Rusted shv18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The North East-India
    Posts
    1,882
    Mentioned
    162 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Hi All,

    i apologise for the delayed update on this thread but thanks to the inevitable, got busy with lots of work so not been able to visit here and do the deed for a while now. However, finally managed to get some "me time" so shall cover the 'Aftermath' as best as possible. In order to ensure that i don't end up blabbering a thesis on the sequence of events that followed right after i reached Guwahati and was getting ready to leave for my place of stay, i shall be breaking up this update in 2 sections which hopefully should make it a bit more pleasant for all the members and readers of this thread to go through (though i doubt the blabbering would be any lesser) ...

    I am sure by the end of it we will all will learn something new about our respective Honda CBR 250Rs (at least i got to know a lot more about my "Littlebird" especially on electronics front, though i completely suck at it!! ) Anyways, let us get on with the story... Popcorn and a 'nice cuppa' is highly recommended!

    THE AFTERMATH (PART 1)

    So after reaching Guwahati, i decided to stay over in the city for a few days to finish off some pending work and of course spend time with my family and friends. The overall trip so far was turning out to be hassle free and without any incident. I did take out my "Littlebird" to commute in and around the city - during night time as i absolutely detest riding in traffic. She was happy and butter smooth and did her city commute duties without complaining one bit. After my work in Guwahati was complete, it was time for me to continue heading towards my place of stay. So the night before, i got my luggage ready and by early morning got everything hooked up to my CBR 250R and off i went. However, from there on things started getting weird rather very very weird! Within first 5-6 kms i felt as if the rear wheel is getting stuck and the vehicle is becoming unbalanced. I stopped and checked if the recurring irritant chain slider had managed to jump the hooks, breaking away from the zip tie straps and somehow got stuck between the chain and the swingarm however, it was looking all good. I then slowed down and continued riding till i noticed that handling was becoming freakishly weirder and weirder as i rode on so i knew in all probability either the front or the rear tire had picked up a puncture! By the time i managed to reach Khanapara junction, the rear tire was almost out of air.. as luck would have it, none of the puncture repair shops were open given the early morning start i did from Guwahati in order to gain considerable amount of distance by the time it would have been Noon. After asking around, i found out that there was a puncture repair shop just at the end of the famous Ganesh temple in Khanapara. However, the main issue was that the rear tire barely had about 7-10 PSI left and i was in no mood to go through the whole process - unpack my luggage, take out the puncture repair kit, hook the electric pump and attempt to repair the puncture by myself. So i rode very slowly while balancing the bike, keeping both foot more or less hovering above the road. Somehow i climbed the ghats, took the corners very slowly and managed to reach the puncture repair shop.

    Luckily the puncture shop had just opened and i was supposedly the first customer of their shop. So the moment my vehicle was parked, the puncture repair guy along with his assistant came over and checked the rear tire for leaks. At first we found a big chunk of glass shard embedded deep inside the centre patch of the rear tire which was taken out and repaired. After rotating the tire and using soap water we managed to find 4 - 5 more micro punctures which couldn't be fixed as this tire already had 4-5 previous puncture repairs all thanks to our brilliant nail and glass shard infested Indian roads. It was clear to me that Michelin Pilot street Radials had more or less reached the end stage of their life thanks to constant torture sessions i took them through and the series of puncture repairs i had carried over the due course of time. I was already late and pissed off by the sequence of events so i asked the puncture repair guy to jack up the tire pressure to 41 PSI which would allow me to complete my 500+ kms of journey (though little bumpy) and then i can decide the next course of action to be taken.



    Pic 1: Note the puncture wound caused by a huge glass shard (probably come off from a beer bottle thrown on the road by some truck driver). Simultaneously, more micro punctures were found all due to glass shards penetrating the center patch of the rear tire.

    Anyways, content with the fact that i could at least ride to my place of stay, i commenced my journey. After riding for about half an hour, i got the shock of my life when i glanced at the MID console for a moment only to find that the MID display console was completely dead and the RPM meter was showing 0 rpms even though i was riding fairly at decent highway speeds! Now this was another blunder which i never expected!! I again stopped, turned off the ignition for a few minutes and then cranked up the engine.. the vehicle came to life but the MID console was dead - no signs of any activity.. besides horn and headlight beam the MID console, the indicators, rear break light and the front parking lights all were non-functional. By now i had already come out of the city and was about 15-20 kms away. This whole period was really downright disconcerting given the fact that i was not in a position to identify and narrow down the culprit let alone if i continue the journey will my "littlebird" breakdown in the middle of nowhere?

    I waited for about 10 mins trying to make up my mind whether to head back to Guwahati city or else continue riding and deal with the consequences if something does end up happening mid-way through the journey. After a while, i decided what the heck... we have had many adventures so far.. perhaps it was time to have another one while being on the state highway, so off i went though worried a bit with 2 things going right one after the other but nonetheless, it was important that i made it to my place of stay on that day itself anyhow. After clocking about 185 kms though my CBR was still running fine, it just felt weird not to see anything on the MID console and not knowing what speeds i was doing, I decided to trouble @psr sir and confirm whether i should continue trying my luck or i should stop somewhere and get my CBR checked! @psr sir suggested that in all probability a 10 amp fuse might have blown due to natural ageing or else some simple short in that particular circuit. Since, the vehicle was still operational i could carry on with my journey. After having a chat with @psr sir, i gained a bit of confidence and went on riding my CBR all the way till i reached my place of stay. Even though she had a punctured rear tire which was more or less losing air slowly but steadily, even though some electrical issue made her go partially blind she brought me safe and sound all the way to my destination. That day it re-affirmed my belief that a "Honda is Honda" it will take all the beating and even with battle wounds all over, it would still manage to take you where you want to go!

    I took about 2 days off and then visited my mechanic just to show him what was going on. He suggested the same possibility that a 10 amp fuse controlling the whole circuit must have blown due to which the MID console and the associated items were not operating. We had also checked the rear tire which by now had managed to gather 10 more micro punctures taking the overall score to 15!! I looked in and around my place of stay to check with nearby shops if they happened to have Michelins but as expected the tire i was offered was Ceat XL Zoom with 140-70-17 specification. i was in no mood to wait for a while to get hold of a decent tire now that i had made up my mind to put her up for sale, so based on recommendation by fellow CBR owners it was decided to place an order for MRF Masseter 140-70-17 over online. I know normally given the circumstances i would not recommend mixing different tire brands with potentially different tire compounds which may hamper the handling and braking of the vehicle however, given the end cycle of ownership i was in, i decided that installing a good radial tire with ample grip would be a good parting gift for my "Littlebird". I then parked my CBR 250R at mechanic's garage and then went ahead with placing an order for the same.

    It took about a weeks time for the rear tire arrive at my doorstep but arrive it did! Unfortunately as luck would have it.. i got very busy for about the next two weeks afterwards, so had to delay the pending work on my CBR. After a while, once things got settled i fixed and appointment with my local mechanic and then reached the shop along with the tire to start the work and then identify and isolate the culprit causing all the electrical issues related to non-functional MID console and other items.



    Pic 2: MRF Masseter 140-70-17 radial tire for the rear. I am huge fan of the Michelins but due to unavailability of the same locally i chose to go with the Masseter.

    The mechanic first put the vehicle on rear paddock stand and then started to dis-assemble the rear wheel to be taken off from the motorcycle. Right after that the sprocket set along with the rubber cush dampers were taken out from alloy wheel hub then the old Michelin Pilot Street Radial tire was removed from the alloy wheel. While the fresh MRF rubber was getting installed, we inspected the condition of the Michelin Pilot Street Radials. As the picture below will show, it was my sheer ignorance and torture offroading sessions i took these street tires through was the primary reason why this rear tire burned out so quickly. I managed to finish it off in under 18,000 kms. If not for my crazy adventures, this same tire is known to last close to 24-25k kms on street and regular highway use. But nonetheless, i am happy to report that even at the end of its lifespan, the grip was still phenomenal and the tire would always give out series of warning when i was reaching the thin line of grip vs rear about to break traction which is really commendable! On dry surface the tire was still sticky and never skidded but on wet surface i had to be a bit cautious.

    All in all, it was worth it and if anybody asks me about which tire to go for without a doubt i would always recommend Michelin Pilot Street radials as they offer the best of both worlds while ensuring rider safety at all the time. Once the MRF Masseter was fitted onto the rear alloy wheel me and the mechanic decided to do a side by side comparison in order to see the difference between a brand new tire Vs a worn out one. If one looks at the pictures below i was rather astonished to find that the Michelin Pilot Street Radial still managed to retain its shape even after taken off from the alloy mag wheel. It confirmed my theory that thanks to better and rigid steel belt construction across the tire, it retained its shape even when it had reached at the end of its life! All the off-roading at Mustang valley had wiped out one side of grooves on the tire while the other side still had plenty of it left but the tire did serve me well for the places i took it through something it was not at all designed for at the first place!















    Pic 3 - 9: Rear tire taken out from the swingarm. Note the number of punctures repaired during the lifetime of the tire and of course those which weren't due to the sheer nos. which even if repaired would have made the tire unsafe for further use on streets. Michelins still holding its shape after 18,000 kms when compared to fresh MRF Masseters all thanks to superior construction and years of experience of Michelin in doing what they do best. Note one section of Michelin tire losing more grooves than the other due to severe off-roading torture sessions it was taken through.

    I was happy yet sad to see Michelins coming off from my CBR however, i had to be practical and would want to provide a decent alternative to the prospective buyer of my CBR in the near future so MRF Masseter it is then.

    ELECTRICAL ISSUES - AND THE NIGHTMARE BEGINS!!

    Right after tire change, it was time to address the electrical issues my bike had displayed in the last 500 kms of highway ride. However, before we could commence with the same, i noticed fresh scratches on the front of the bike. On further enquiry initially my mechanic evaded questions telling me that these scratch marks might have been their earlier however, he knew my OCMD so when i told him that i know each and every scratch that has ever occurred on my bike he apologised and said it might have happened during storage. However, i was not mad as i considered it to be another battle scar If at all the supposed new owner would like to get rid of it either a touch up paint job, stickering work or else a fresh panel would get it sorted as it won't cost more than 500 bucks to take care of the whole deal either way.



    Pic 10: Note the scratches on the LHS side of the front fairing. I had no choice but to accept them as fresh battle scars.

    Moving on, the mechanic then started to dis-assemble the fairings from the vehicle while i dialed @psr sir to trouble him in order to double check and troubleshoot As per @psr sir we would first prepare a list of possible suspects and then narrow it down to a few as we isolate one from the other. We had looked at the following possible suspects:

    1) Battery might be on its way out which would lead to some amount of AC current jumping from the alternator creating unclean voltage spike thus end result-blowing up a fuse
    2) the fuse itself had become weak due to operation and natural ageing.
    3) RR unit might have gone bad though highly unlikely as little or almost no such cases have been reported
    4) Rear brake bulb might have gotten fused which led to spike in voltage thus taking out the fuse
    5) The alternator might be leaking current which meant it was slowly dying - again highly unlikely as no such cases have been reported
    6) The wiring loom might have a fault somewhere
    7) Rust built up inside the connectors leading to increase in electrical resistance leading to a fuse blowing up
    8) Wires shortening somewhere close to the fuse box or may be at the ignition switch itself shorting out
    9) The MID console may have had an internal short or else the connectors to the MID console may have developed resistance due to being exposed to high moisture environment
    10) Brake light switch might have shorted.

    We roughly had a fair no. of suspects to go through so we went through the obvious. We first checked the fuse box and found the 10 Amp fuse which controlled the power to the MID console, indicators, rear tail light, front pilot lights and the rear brake light. As expected we found the fuse to be blown. So the first step was to replace the 10 amp fuse and see if everything is hunky dory. At first after replacing the fuse when we turned on the ignition, all the systems came online and everything was fine. However, after sometime when i turned on the ignition again, there was a crackling noise and the MID console went dead which confirmed that the Fuse was not the problem and it must be something else. We checked the 10 amp Fuse and found it to be blown.

    We then moved towards the back of the motorcycle and took out the rear brake light bulb to inspect. We found that the master glow light filament had burned out so it was replaced immediately. I guess i was happy that more or less we must have isolated the problem. We again replaced the 10 amp fuse the turned on the ignition: all the systems came online and MID console and the rear brake light was also operational but again after a second or third test of turning the ignition off and on, there was a crackling noise and the MID console went dead! We again checked the rear brake light bulb but it was found to be all OK! By now i was scratching my head wondering what kind of weird symptoms my bike is displaying? @psr sir told me to be patient and then move on with the list.

    While i was chatting with @psr sir my mechanic pointed out that the rear brake light switch had come off from the connector. We cleaned up the connector and the terminal with WD 40 and then re-attached them. We then changed the 10 amp fuse and tried turning on the ignition only to find the 10 amp fuse blowing up again!! But the weird part was that the fuse would blow up randomly and intermittently. At times the vehicle would be absolutely fine and would display no symptoms. It would happily crank and run while the MID console and everything else running just fine. And then within a few minutes when the same process is repeated the 10 Amp fuse would blow up!

    We then moved onto our next suspect. A multimeter was brought in to check the voltage of the battery. Amaron MF battery was happily retaining a charge of 13.25 volts which was in normal range so battery was ruled out. Next we cranked up the engine and measured the voltage at the terminals while the engine was idling. The multimeter displayed 14.38 - 14.42 volts which was normal. Now if the RR unit had gone bad, when raising the engine rpms one will find the nominal voltage surging way past the recommended 14.3 - 14.4 volts at the terminal. However in this case when we raised the rpm to 3,000 and then later upto 6,000 the voltage readings at the terminal were still hovering between 14.38-14.39 volts which confirmed that the RR unit was healthy and functioning normally. So few suspects were knocked off quickly from the list.

    The mechanic then went ahead with dismantling the front fairing to access the MID console and take it out from the connector. We then took out the MID console. At first the connector was doused with WD 40 to remove any moisture or rust deposits inside it then the MID console itself was turned over and the connector pins inside were sprayed with WD 40 to negate the possibility of any resistance due to which this may happen. The MID console was put back in and the 10 amp fuse was again replaced with a fresh piece. We turned on the ignition and started the bike, again everything was fully functional and MID console and all the system were go. However ater 4 - 5 runs of switching the bike off and then on the 10 amp fuse would blow up. We had again changed the 10 amp fuse and tried checking the connectors again but this time a new symptom cropped up!!

    The moment the ignition switch was turned on there would be one crackling sound right after the other and then everything would turn off! Nothing turned on and now i couldn't even start the bike unlike what was the case earlier























    Pic 11 - 21: The list of suspects systematically isolated in order to try and identify the primary culprit behind all this disturbance in the force!

    After scratching our head over it we then started checking all the fuses and then later found out that the master 30 amp fuse which is situated in the starter relay: one which controls master load had blown up! i was slowly getting annoyed and began to wonder why the hell my CBR is displaying one crazy symptom after the other and out of all other bikes on the road why does it always has to be an electrical problem on my motorcycle!! Last time it was the earthing issue which took quite a while to identify... and now this!

    Anyways, we then took out the connector of the starter relay and found both the relay connector and the fuse area to have huge greenish white deposits which confirmed that fair amount of oxidation had taken place and as a result the presence of the deposits. So again the services of WD 40 spray was used to drench the connectors and the fuse area. We replaced the 30 Amp fuse with a fresh one, re-connected the wires, replaced the 10 amp fuse and then turned on the ignition switch only to find that 10 amp and the 30 amp fuse would blow up rightaway. So now the next step was to take out all the individual fuses from their respective connectors and douse all the connectors with WD 40 spray in order to remove any potential moisture/rusts deposits. We also took out the 30 amp fuses which controlled the ABS unit though none of the fuses in that separate fuse box had blown.

    While i was busy fuming @psr sir suggested that he might have found the culprit! he advised to completely disconnect and take out the rear brake light switch from the motorcycle. It is usually connected to the rear brake lever via metal spring. As per him if the brake light switch had shorted it is possible that the same would irritate the system and the 10 amp fuse would blow up. The mechanic then taped the ends of the connector of the rear brake light switch first. We then replaced both the 30 amp fuse in the starter relay and then the 10 amp fuse controlling the MID console and the associated electrical units. We then turned on the ignition only to hear another crackling sound. We immediately inspected the 10 Amp fuse box only to find that the earlier 10 amp fuse which was busy blowing up every now and then was found to be ok. But on further inspection we found that the 30 amp fuse in the starter relay had again blown up!

    i was quite pissed off by then as the little issue what i had come to solve we ended up finding a much bigger headache now which simply turns everything off: rendering the bike completely dead and useless!! As suggested by @psr sir the mechanic dis-assembled the rear brake light switch from the rear brake lever and completely took it out from the system. We again connected another 30 amp fuse and turned on the ignition switch only to find the 30 amp fuse blowing up immediately while the 10 Amp fuse controlling the MID console to be still holding up. This confirmed that the brake light witch had shorted out which led to the 10 amp fuse controlling the MID console, indicators, rear tail lights and the rear brake light blowing up while i was on my way back to my place of stay. Considering what was happening right in front of me i thanked my stars that my "Littlebird" didn't throw any tantrums coz if for any reason the 30 Amp fuse inside the started relay would have blown up i could have been in a deep soup! But i guess some progress is better than nothing right? Anyways, this meant that i now had to source a rear brake light switch which was not in stock with my mechanic and in probability was also not there with any of the close by Honda SVCs.































    Pic 22 - 36: 30 Amp starter relay fuse found to be blowing up constantly. All connectors cleaned up with WD 40 while the fuse box and the ABS fuses were also taken out and cleaned with WD 40. Eventually the culprit for 10 amp fuse blowing up was isolated to rear brake light switch. The 30 Amp starter relay now kept on blowing up the moment the ignition was turned to ON position.

    @psr sir suspected something major was causing the master 30 Amp fuse to blow up. He suggested that he had to re-look at the wiring diagram of Honda CBR 250R to understand and then try and narrow down the culprit causing this issue. It might be a break or fault anywhere in the wiring loom and might be something wrong with the connectors to the fuse box or else worse - the alternator must be shorting internally!By now we had spent more than 4 hours to isolate the culprit - rear brake light switch only to find a new symptom cropping up and probably all the more serious.

    I was pretty irritated by then so decided to wrap it up for the day rather than continue pursuing this new culprit and resolve the issue once and for all at a later date when our respective minds are fresh. I also had a terribly busy schedule coming up soon (which un-knowingly and un-expectedly would eventually delay the troubleshooting by over a month to the extent where this project would take a backseat for while!!) so it was mutually decided to postpone this project. The motorcycle was to be left in the garage of my mechanic and i indirectly told him that there better not be any new "battle scars" during this period of storage at his shop.

    Since, my CBR was "popping" 30 Amp fuses like anything, i decided to pick up a bunch of 30 Amp fuses from a nearby car accessories shop knowing full well that if and when we commence with this project all over again, it will take going through a few of these fuses till we isolate the culprit and work on it.



    Pic 37: fresh pieces of 30 Amp Fuse picked up for the upcoming task to isolate the new culprit busy making my bike completely non-functional!

    Since, i did have a new toy to play around with (Read new found love: https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/superbi...nja-650-a.html) i whole heartedly admit that my Honda CBR 250R had now taken the secondary role in my life as it naturally happens "absolute power corrupts absolutely!!" My priorities had shifted to this green elephant - riding it, understanding the unrelenting torque and power this machine is capable of dispensing at the wring of the throttle... so whether i like it or not my "Littlebird" had to to wait out a bit longer to finish off this work and get her back to her full health.


    I know the overall blabbering is bit too much but hopefully it has covered some of the bases in order to understand a potential electrical fault which may occur in any Honda CBR 250R as the vehicle ages and is exposed to various elements. We shall cover the second part of "the aftermath" as soon as i can manage some free time...

    Until then..


    Cheers,












    Last edited by shv18; 06-26-2018 at 07:00 PM. Reason: corrections
    psr likes this.
    A quote by a toilet, " use me well, keep me clean, i would never tell anybody whatever i have seen.." :P

  10. #640
    psr
    psr is offline
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CHENNAI , TAMILNADU
    Posts
    5,796
    Mentioned
    673 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Default Re: The story so far.. My Honda CBR 250R

    Quote Originally Posted by shv18 View Post
    Hi All,

    i apologise for the delayed update on this thread but thanks to the inevitable, got busy with lots of work so not been able to visit here and do the deed for a while now.

    Eventually the culprit for 10 amp fuse blowing up was isolated to rear brake light switch. The 30 Amp starter relay now kept on blowing up the moment the ignition was turned to ON position.
    @psr sir suspected something major was causing the master 30 Amp fuse to blow up. He suggested that he had to re-look at the wiring diagram of Honda CBR 250R to understand and then try and narrow down the culprit causing this issue. It might be a break or fault anywhere in the wiring loom and might be something wrong with the connectors to the fuse box or else worse - the alternator must be shorting internally!By now we had spent more than 4 hours to isolate the culprit - rear brake light switch only to find a new symptom cropping up and probably all the more serious.

    I was pretty irritated by then so decided to wrap it up for the day rather than continue pursuing this new culprit and resolve this new weird issue once and for all. I also had a terribly busy schedule coming up (which un-knowingly and un-expectedly would eventually delay the troubleshooting by over a month to the extent where this project would take a backseat for while!!) so it was mutually decided to postpone this project. The motorcycle was to be left in the garage of my mechanic and i indirectly told him that there better not be any new "battle scars" during this period of storage at his shop. Since, my CBR was "popping" 30 Amp fuses like anything, i decided to pick up a bunch of 30 Amp fuses from a nearby car accessories shop knowing full well that if and when we commence with this project all over again, it will take going through a few of these fuses till we isolate the culprit and work on it.

    I know the overall blabbering is bit too much but hopefully it has covered some of the bases in order to understand a potential electrical fault which may occur in any Honda CBR 250R as the vehicle ages and is exposed to various elements. We shall cover the second part of "the aftermath" as soon as i can manage some free time...

    Until then..
    Cheers,
    @ Shv18 While the pictures of your tour had come out great, your bike had suffered through the vagaries of the climate and usage.

    The problems arising esp., in your CBR250 had made me realize once again how important it is to be strong in understanding the fundamentals of Automobile Electronics.

    No other bike had thrown up so many Electrical and electronic Gremlins like your bike has so far , and it was a good learning curve for me..learning that nothing can be taken for granted , and to be on toes most of the times.

    By sharing the same you are making this thread an Almanac of information for all CBR250R owners to benefit in Future.

    Good luck.
    When Was The Last Time,You Did Something For The First Time.

Similar Threads

  1. Honda CBR 250R
    By The Stig in forum Motorcycle Ownership Experiences
    Replies: 24113
    Last Post: 1 Day Ago, 04:04 PM
  2. A letter To the mistress: The Honda Dazzler Ownership Story
    By Rtz_Smro in forum Coffee Lounge:Off Topic
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-19-2014, 05:30 PM
  3. 2013 Honda CBR 250R
    By neevarp16 in forum News
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 01-10-2013, 02:38 PM
  4. Yamaha R15 V2.0 or Honda CBR 250R
    By anuraj in forum What Bike?
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-24-2012, 09:34 PM
  5. Tale of contrasts-The Bajaj Story Vs The H H Story
    By romeoinvisible5 in forum News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-28-2010, 02:42 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •