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Thread: Guide (Run-in & Maintenance) for new Pulsar Owners

  1. #1
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    Default Guide (Run-in & Maintenance) for new Pulsar Owners

    Hi Guys,

    There have been several posts where people have unknowingly ruined (or risk ruinning) their bikes by not running in their bikes properly. Like : http://www.xbhp.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1477 In some posts I offered to give some good reading document to those who wanted some guidance on running in and maitaining thier new Bikes. I am not the author of this document, but I just downloaded it from the files section of the bajajpulsar@yahoogroups.com forum.

    However as the Govt. of India has blocked access to all yahoo groups due to some stupid reason, most people cannot access this document. I emailed this document to several xBHPians who have liked it. So I thought of posting the document here itself here so that It can be of use to everyone.

    Sorry for cross-posting, but valuable information like this is better spread than hidden.

    Now back to the document. This document has been painstakingly written by Dr. Vistasp Sethna (Doc.). I wrote to him last night, asking him permission to cross-post his manuscript and he willingly agreed. Many members here who know him; know him to maintain his Silky Red Pulsar 180 Classic in scratch less condition, something that even the Company Owned Showroom Service Centre people can vouch for.

    I have slightly modified this document so that it suits the DTS-i. But it is applicable to almost all bikes and vehicles that need a running in. For other vehicles the actual durations may vary but the general idea would be the same.

    Please dont bring the DTS-i [8] Karizma war to this topic. If you feel like criticizing this document, please dont do it here. But constructive suggestions and your personal views and inputs will be welcome! So go ahead and read it. And take care of your bikes! Please dont ruin them.

    Thanks Doc!




    A DOCUMENT FOR NEW PULSAR OWNERS

    STARTING TECHNIQUE:

    For morning starts, use the kick + choke (I leave the choke for a slow count of 30 and then close the choke decrementally till the engine is firing smoothly).

    Its a good practice to first (with the ignition in the OFF position) depress the clutch and kick 5 times for the oil in the sump to circulate slightly.

    Do not start the bike when the headlight switch is set to ON or even if the dome/pilot lamps only position is set, as it may cause both/either of your bulbs to fuse due to surge of current.

    Keep the clutch depressed for some time alternating with depressing/releasing the clutch for the oil to flow between the plates.

    Ride smoothly without any sudden acceleration for the first couple of kilometers, then open up.



    RIDING TECHNIQUE (during and after run-in):

    Below 60 kmph in first 1000 km and below 70 kmph for the next 1000 km (1000-2000)

    Rule of thumb - during running in, never race the engine rpm to beyond half of the rpm range available (about 4000 rpm in the first 1000 km and can go as high as 5000-5500 rpm in the next 1000 km)

    Sudden non-sustained bursts are OK as long as the rpm does not shoot beyond control - many even say that such bursts in the second 1000 km (with increasing frequency after about 1500 km) actually help to "open out" the engine and the usable rev-range better.

    NEVER ride at a sustained speed/rpm for any length of time EVEN IF you are below the accepted limits - keep changing the RPM and speed by changing the throttle position at short intervals to prevent glazing of your piston, and also getting the various moving parts bedded down nicely at different speeds. What this does is makes the bike smooth and the power delivery seamless across the entire power band rather than just at one particular speed.

    During the run-in period while u adhere to the said 4000 rpm max and speed limits, it is necessary that every gear be taken through the entire usable rpm range. After warm up for a minute or two (idle rpm will be about 1000 rpm) and a slow, gradual and steady moving through the gears, after a while, a couple of kms down the road, take your bike through the rpm range (up to say 3700 during running in) for ALL gears. Do it as often as possible (the urban traffic and signals will help you in this). This does help to run-in your bike better.

    There is no problem in going for long rides, but try not to run the engine non-stop for more than 25-30 minutes - preferably take a butt break, smell the roses, look around and then start off again.

    Gears are very tricky things to bed in properly so preferably (at least during the run in) do not let someone else ride your bike - even if he's very gentle, his shifting technique will be different from yours and you'll be able to "feel" something amiss in the gears once you ride the bike again.

    Make a proper positive effort to shift gears, just a nudge wont do (please dont bang your foot on them if they seem tight ease off and try again it always works!).

    Remember, like all other moving parts, your disc brake needs to be run-in too for proper functioning at all speeds practice using your disc at progressively higher speeds in an open area without traffic. When using the disc, remember that the handle should be straight ahead (never in a turn) and there should not be any gravel on the road, or you WILL skid. Get the FEEL of the discs and you can then use them with greater confidence.

    After completing the running in, don't start rippin' ur bike at 100+ immediately (a commemorative "ton" is a must though just to appease the adrenaline Gods!!!!), get your bike used to incremental increases in speed in multiples of 5 kmph and then move to the next higher speed.



    THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR:

    Preferably wash your bike thoroughly once a week and check for any leaks, loose fastenings, etc. Do not splash water onto the bike (especially the top of the tank) with a mug or a hosepipe, either spray wash (pressure) or else wash with a wet cloth.

    IMPORTANT: In the event that water does get into the tank through the filler cap or into the carb bowl, the bike will sputter and die on you a number of times afterwards. Water being heavier than petrol will collect in the carb bowl and can be drained. PROCEDURE: First shut off the petcock (to prevent draining expensive petrol in the process!). Then loosen the screw seen immediately below the carb bowl (the lowest carb screw looking at it from the left side of the bike) and let water/petrol from the bowl drain out thru the transparent pipe leading out from the bottom of the carb. After the drainage has stopped, FIRST tighten the screw and THEN put on the petcock.

    Use a car shampoo to wash your bike, not ordinary soap or any other household detergents that will dull the finish of the paint. Car shampoos with Carnauba wax are a good idea (Formula 1, Waxpol, etc.)

    Keep an eye open for any leaks around the top of the engine and near the gearbox (excess chain oil also causes an oil slick to develop on the chain cover). Also look at the ground beneath the bike every morning to check for any oil spill (WARNING: After an oil change, make sure the drain nut has been properly tightened).

    Malfunctioning switches/electricals (possible problem areas - front brake switch and starter).

    Wash your tyres and top up the air pressure once a week and slowly rotate and inspect each tyre to look for cuts, cracks, embedded sharp objects, and also pebbles in the treads which should be removed.

    While washing the wheels/tyres, check for loose/broken/bent spokes (check wheel trueness once in 3 months or so, especially if riding on bad roads or have hit a pothole hard/at speed).

    While washing, make sure that the drain holes in the filler cap area and under the silencer are not clogged.

    Get your chain-slack adjusted and chain lubricated preferably every 800 km.

    Check battery fluid level at least once a month and keep an eye on the brake fluid level too (though that's just precautionary).

    Make it a habit to shut off the petcock whenever you park your bike so that it becomes instinctive after a while. Adding an in-line petrol filter of the Caliber is a good idea (in between the petcock and the carb).

    Keep the bike on center stand if it is going to be parked for a long time. Also, do not park the bike on side-stand on a slight slop as the Pulsar has a tendency to slide forward off the side stand and fall down many a times.



    PUNCTURES:

    When you detect a puncture, rotate the wheel to try and find the nail and remove it to prevent further damage to the tyre/tube, multiple punctures etc.

    Loosen the base check nut of the valve so that the valve has room to move and does not get uprooted from the tube while wheeling your bike to the puncture walla.

    Do NOT sit on the bike or ride it to the puncture walla. If you must, start the bike, put it in gear and slowly ride it to the puncture wall, WALKING ALONGSIDE.

    Make sure that the puncture is repaired with a pucca heat cured patch and not the ready-made circular patches, which have a tendency to start leaking in summer/hot conditions.

    After the puncture is repaired, make sure that the tyre is seated properly onto the rim by checking that the line all along the sidewall is equidistant at all points from the edge of the rim. In case of improper seating, you will feel a wobble/puncture feeling while riding and should get this checked.

    Also make sure the puncture walla coats the insides of your tyre with talcum powder and replaces the rubber patti over the center of your rim if worn out.

    Always have the black rubber caps over the valves as a second line of defense. Make sure the puncture wall replaces the split quarter pins while refitting the wheel.

    IMPORTANT: In case of a front tyre puncture, be very careful that no one presses the front brake lever while the wheel is out to prevent the disc brake calipers from coming together, making it impossible to refit the front wheel. The only way to take them apart is to bleed the brake fluid and it is a complex task to be done only at an authorised service station. As a precaution, you can put something between the front brake and the handle grip. For example a small spanner between the lever and the accelerator rotor, to hlod them apart.
    2003 Bajaj Pulsar 180 DTS-i (first gen, spoked 18" wheels)
    2005 Ford Fusion+
    2006 Bajaj Wave 110 DTS-i
    2010 Bergamont Tronic Sport

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    gliffy
    its been a while, jus gt my comp fixed, meanwhile have don 1207 on my 180dtsi in 20 days. got the first service done, and have been trying to run it in to the best of my abilities [8D]
    thanx for ur very valueable directions i am sure th'll be very useful.....havent crossed 4000 rpm n 6o kmph yet....but now that u say, will try reving it up a little now n then
    gud luck with ur bike dude
    keep her happy
    cheers
    been there...dun that.

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    quote:Originally posted by rash_rp

    It will surely help a lot of DTSi owners prevent smoking...
    That's exactly why I posted it. Hope some more of them read it! Has helped me a lot!
    2003 Bajaj Pulsar 180 DTS-i (first gen, spoked 18" wheels)
    2005 Ford Fusion+
    2006 Bajaj Wave 110 DTS-i
    2010 Bergamont Tronic Sport

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    the idea of running in 1k or 2k kms at slow speeds was phased out in other countries,here with obscene parts quality it's different.actually after 750 kms u should gradually increase the load on engine,than let the bike rest to recover,this makes the bike open the bore's expantion to high speeds.if for the run in period there is no high speed exposure to the bike,it won't perform to it's max.this is a truth excepted world over.but if someone is doubtful bout it plz clearify before implementing this.BTW we ran in venkatesh's t'bird on this principle and it kicks other t'bird's ass
    \'87 High Torque RD 350B
    in first gear,6000 rpm,whack the throttle.

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    quote:Originally posted by rajnish

    ........actually after 750 kms u should gradually increase the load on engine,than let the bike rest to recover,this makes the bike open the bore's expantion to high speeds...........
    Hi Rajnish,

    I too have read about it. They say short bursts to the next RPM are recommended to open up the engine. I plan to do that... right now I am some 530 KM clocked. But I guess will start off after 1000 or so KM.

    And could you please elaborate on the "rest" for the bike concept for the benefit of all of us.

    Some people have told that you simply hold back the clutch and coast along till you can and let the engine return to idle speed. Doing this is enough!

    Others say that you need to pull over, stop the engine, let it cool and take a butt break for a couple of minutes.

    What do you say Rajnish? What is the best approach.

    And for the benefit of all of us could you please elaborate the method (step-by-step if you please) you followed to run in Venkatesh's T-bird? How long and fast (KMPH or RPM) were those high speed runs and the rest periods? Will be some nice info for sure! Afterall that's what differentiates his Bike from the mopeds

    [}] []
    2003 Bajaj Pulsar 180 DTS-i (first gen, spoked 18" wheels)
    2005 Ford Fusion+
    2006 Bajaj Wave 110 DTS-i
    2010 Bergamont Tronic Sport

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    quote:Originally posted by rajnish

    the idea of running in 1k or 2k kms at slow speeds was phased out in other countries,here with obscene parts quality it's different
    Reminds me...In Bajaj they were experimenting with an aluminium block for 2 stroke engines (Scooters, Sunny and KB 125). These had a hard chrome bore that was very smooth and wear resistant.

    These required no running in whatsoever! And had an amazing life of over 200,000 KM.

    It was my friend's factory that had developed these blocks with some german collaboration and they were supplying to BAL.

    But I don't really know what happened as I guess 2 strokes are virtually out here and my friend's company seems bust !

    Anyways most 4 stroke bike engines use Aluminium blocks with a honed cast iron liner pressed in. With the exception of I guess the HH 97 CC ones that still use the CI ones and of course the Bullet Electra range.
    2003 Bajaj Pulsar 180 DTS-i (first gen, spoked 18" wheels)
    2005 Ford Fusion+
    2006 Bajaj Wave 110 DTS-i
    2010 Bergamont Tronic Sport

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    it is the butt resting method.
    it involves opening the bike,taking it to 70,then rest,then taking it to 80 then rest.this is the gradual run in wherein u make the liner,piston,rings and the valves accustomed to the heat and expansion of high speed,so tht eventually when u open the bike it won't hesitate coz it had not been taken to those speeds and the liner etc won't take the expansion due to lack of clearence,clearence is the key here.
    \'87 High Torque RD 350B
    in first gear,6000 rpm,whack the throttle.

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    Thanks Rajnish!

    Any more tips for us? How long do you stick to that speed or drop as soon as you touch it.

    And how long a butt rest do you suggest?
    2003 Bajaj Pulsar 180 DTS-i (first gen, spoked 18" wheels)
    2005 Ford Fusion+
    2006 Bajaj Wave 110 DTS-i
    2010 Bergamont Tronic Sport

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    a gradual surge of speed followed by a rest of 2-3 mins will do.
    My kb 125 has a chromed bore only,the life unfortunately is not very good.also they can't be rebored.but yes life is better than the std.bore.
    \'87 High Torque RD 350B
    in first gear,6000 rpm,whack the throttle.

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    quote:Originally posted by rajnish

    it is the butt resting method.
    it involves opening the bike,taking it to 70,then rest,then taking it to 80 then rest.
    Hi,
    I have a doubt. DO we take it to 70 and then come 2 a complete halt(2-3 mins) and then move on again and take it to 80 and come 2 a halt? OR just depress the clutch and move "freely" till we slow down to a low speed(but not halt) and then continue?

    Vivek
    Like the aroma of burning rubber!

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