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Thread: Motorcycle Charging System & Mods

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andante View Post
    I'd be especially curious about your custom regulator. Is it a common shunt type regulator or is it something a little more ingenious?
    It is a shunt type regulator only with uprated SCRs, diodes and other components to handle the increased power from the stator. I could have used one from some other bikes like Zma, but decided to make one myself as I would then be able to use exactly the components needed to handle my stator output. No second guessing if the Zma regulator will handle the stator output or not. Cost was another reason - try finding a rectifier unit for 100 bucks!

    Quote Originally Posted by rahul9985 View Post
    i have a doubt- when the winding has been changed, more current is being produced.. wont that damage the existing electricals that are working on 12V and a particular rating of current?
    That is the reason, I had to replace the stock regulator with a custom made one.
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    What I am wondering is if it would be possible to design a regulator that does not waste the extra power generated. Perhaps by using some sort of active voltage regulation. I'm no master at electronics, but as far as I know it should be possible to design a regulator that can handle the required current. Or perhaps the issue is that the voltage on the alternator can rise too high and zap the insulation.
    Any ideas?

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    As rpm increases, voltage generated increases too. The output can not be open circuited due to arcing problem - that would have removed the wastage. So, they are shunted to decrease the voltage. This wastes energy.

    The only other thing I can think of is to use a variable autotransformer along with a microcontroller to vary the primary to secondary turns ratio as rpms change. But then, it will be too bulky to be used in a bike. (Not sure about that though!)
    Your biking tells a lot about the person you are!

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    Quote Originally Posted by abhijeet080808 View Post
    That is the reason, I had to replace the stock regulator with a custom made one.
    u have replaced only the regulator.. but when your existing electricals havent been changed, how will the new regulator help.. it can allow more current but will the electricals sustain that unless they are changed.. if u are using changing the headlights, they'll sustain higher currents.. but what about others? the tail lamps etc and other components which cannot sustain higher currents?
    sorry, i ask too many questions..
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    Look suppose the stock coil generates 50W and my custom coil generated 100W. Now, if I connect a 10W bulb across the 50W coil, it will only supply 10W to the bulb. It can supply UPTO 50W to a load. That is its upper limit. Similarly, if I use my 100W coil to power the 10W bulb, it will only supply 10W to the bulb. And, it has the capacity to power a 100W bulb. If I connect the 100W bulb, only then, it will supply the full 100W.

    So my wiring need not be changed as the same power is going to be handled through them as before. Yes, my headlight will change. So, I will have to used thicker wires there and there only.
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    Quote Originally Posted by abhijeet080808 View Post
    Look suppose the stock coil generates 50W and my custom coil generated 100W. Now, if I connect a 10W bulb across the 50W coil, it will only supply 10W to the bulb. It can supply UPTO 50W to a load. That is its upper limit. Similarly, if I use my 100W coil to power the 10W bulb, it will only supply 10W to the bulb. And, it has the capacity to power a 100W bulb. If I connect the 100W bulb, only then, it will supply the full 100W.

    So my wiring need not be changed as the same power is going to be handled through them as before. Yes, my headlight will change. So, I will have to used thicker wires there and there only.
    got it now.. u are generating more power so that u can even use things which run on higher wattage.. the current drawn by the existing components would be same, but if required they can be changed to more powerful ones.. when you will use the higher rated ones, u'll have to change the wires as they may burn...
    am i right? i think so
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    Yeah, you got that right!
    Your biking tells a lot about the person you are!

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    Quote Originally Posted by abhijeet080808 View Post
    As rpm increases, voltage generated increases too. The output can not be open circuited due to arcing problem - that would have removed the wastage. So, they are shunted to decrease the voltage. This wastes energy.

    The only other thing I can think of is to use a variable autotransformer along with a microcontroller to vary the primary to secondary turns ratio as rpms change. But then, it will be too bulky to be used in a bike. (Not sure about that though!)
    Yea, that's exactly what I was worried about. So all options, except a shunt regulator, will need the "car-type" alternator that allows for varying the field strength.

    Even an autotransformer setup will let the primary voltage rise to high levels when the secondary load is small and the engine RPM is high, causing the same problems with insulation.

    This is probably off the wall, but how about multiple taps on the stator itself? If the insulation of the stator can take the induced voltage, it should be possible to pick the tap that has the voltage required.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andante View Post
    Yea, that's exactly what I was worried about. So all options, except a shunt regulator, will need the "car-type" alternator that allows for varying the field strength.

    Even a autotransformer setup will let the primary voltage rise to high levels when the secondary load is small and the engine RPM is high, causing the same problems with insulation.

    This is probably off the wall, but how about multiple taps on the stator itself? If the insulation of the stator can take the induced voltage, it should be possible to pick the tap that has the voltage required.
    No, the insulation would not be such a problem. At around 10k rpms, voltage generated is around 90V or so. Multiple taps would be a solution. I had thought about that. But that would have meant using a micro-controller in something as simple as a regulator. You could say, lazy me! Maybe someone could use this idea for a college project etc.
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    Quote Originally Posted by abhijeet080808 View Post
    No, the insulation would not be such a problem. At around 10k rpms, voltage generated is around 90V or so. Multiple taps would be a solution. I had thought about that. But that would have meant using a micro-controller in something as simple as a regulator. You could say, lazy me! Maybe someone could use this idea for a college project etc.
    Okay, had no idea about the unloaded voltages. 90V you say. In that case a even a linear voltage regulator might be able to do the job. Since the coil voltage is anyway sort of inversely related to the load at a given RPM, it would not have to dissipate too much of heat. (The shunt regulator will anyway dissipate plenty of heat in that case too.) The only challenge would be to build a voltage regulator that is capable of dropping so much voltage. (Worst case would be high RPM with a partial load.)

    Or for the really technical a PWM buck converter capable of handling the system load (a couple tens of amperes at most I think) would even eliminate most of the power dissipation that a linear regulator faces.

    It would be really interesting to see if it could be done cheaply. But I don't think the gains are worth the effort. But I find it an interesting thought experiment.

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