Since '02 xBhp is different things to different people. From a close knit national community of bikers to India's only motorcycling lifestyle magazine and a place to make like-minded biker friends. Join us

WE DESIGN ON

Lenovo ThinkPad
Castrol Power 1

Check the helmet from inside.

Our Partners

User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Idling efficienacy

  1. #1
    Rusted harshaguduru's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Hyderabad
    Posts
    337
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Idling efficienacy

    Tech gurus of Xbhp.....

    does anyone know the efficiency of an engine while idling..
    any engine car or bike...fuel consumed per time while idling in neutral..

    no wild guesses. Please substantiate with reason or with document proof
    thanks and regards
    harsha
    Why is the man who invests all your money, called a broker?

  2. #2
    Rusted Aryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New Delhi/ Shillong
    Posts
    18,673
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Topic Moved and Approved.
    ...in search of that perfect world - My Travel Blog :)

  3. #3
    Rusted moeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Hyderabad/On the highways
    Posts
    2,422
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You can test that by filling some petrol(about 50 ml) and running the engine on neutral till the petrol burns up completely.

  4. #4
    Moderator antz.bin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Nasik / Pune
    Posts
    5,292
    Blog Entries
    4
    Mentioned
    35 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    do it the way showroom people calculate avg of bikes.
    1.Turn petrol knob off.
    2.Take 50/100 ml of petrol in a small bottle (with a pipe at the bottom)
    3.remove pipe from knob to carb from carb side, connect bottle pipe to carb
    4.start engine + start clock and keep it idling ONLY till petrol in the bottle finishes, NOT till engine stutters to death(i.e. it uses up petrol inside the carb too).
    5.Note timing and post in this thread.

    Easy way: Turn off engine whenever you have to idle for more than 15 seconds. You will end up saving a bit of petrol for the nation in the long run. LONG LIVE ENGINE KILL SWITCH

    P.S.: I personally dont feel there is wastage of 10sec idling worth of petrol in starting a bike(as is the common consensus) as the energy required for starting the bike is provided by the rider(kick start) or battery(starter) and not by the petrol inside the chamber, so in my opinon, if we start in gear, and ride off immediately, no petrol is wasted.

    BTW I had a query.. If we (in a hypothetical situation) happen to kill the engine in high gear with the bike still in motion(using engine braking to slow down, no clutch), does petrol continue to enter combustion chamber or does it stop as soon as we kill the engine.

  5. #5
    Rusted
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ahmedabad
    Posts
    429
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antz.bin View Post
    BTW I had a query.. If we (in a hypothetical situation) happen to kill the engine in high gear with the bike still in motion(using engine braking to slow down, no clutch), does petrol continue to enter combustion chamber or does it stop as soon as we kill the engine.
    Depends on if you're riding a carbed bike or an FI bike. In the case of the carb, as long as there's air being sucked through the carb, there's petrol going into the cylinder. The only way to make sure there's no more fuel coming from a carb is to turn off the fuel stop and run until the carbs float chamber is empty.

    For FI, no power to the injector, no fuel in the manifold.

  6. #6
    Addicted sudharma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andante View Post
    Depends on if you're riding a carbed bike or an FI bike. In the case of the carb, as long as there's air being sucked through the carb, there's petrol going into the cylinder. The only way to make sure there's no more fuel coming from a carb is to turn off the fuel stop and run until the carbs float chamber is empty.

    For FI, no power to the injector, no fuel in the manifold.
    +1 to that. Whether the engine is killed or only the throttle is closed during coasting, the amount of fuel comsumed is same (at minimum throttle position) for older bikes and cars. But- I have seen in some modern scooters a fuel cut-off solenoid on the carburettor. Here switching off the Ignition may make a slight difference.
    Even in Maruthi-800 (old) Carburettor there is a Solenoid to cut-off the fuel to the Idling circuit.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  7. #7
    Rusted svjhonda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Kolkata
    Posts
    932
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Andante View Post
    Depends on if you're riding a carbed bike or an FI bike. In the case of the carb, as long as there's air being sucked through the carb, there's petrol going into the cylinder. The only way to make sure there's no more fuel coming from a carb is to turn off the fuel stop and run until the carbs float chamber is empty.

    For FI, no power to the injector, no fuel in the manifold.
    ^
    Slight correction:
    Unless you wind the throttle, no fuel gets sucked in, because the needle closes the fuel valve. So even in there is petrol in the float bowl, and throttle is closed, no fuel enters the manifold.
    (I think it works this way, correct if I'm wrong)

    For Fi you're spot on.

  8. #8
    Addicted sudharma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Bangalore
    Posts
    140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by svjhonda View Post
    ^
    Slight correction:
    Unless you wind the throttle, no fuel gets sucked in, because the needle closes the fuel valve. So even in there is petrol in the float bowl, and throttle is closed, no fuel enters the manifold.
    (I think it works this way, correct if I'm wrong)

    For Fi you're spot on.
    Still little amount of fuel will be sucked in when throttle is closed for keeping the engine idling.

    My Maruthi-800 is not FI its Carburettor.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  9. #9
    Rusted moeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Hyderabad/On the highways
    Posts
    2,422
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I have a query. Does a bike consume more petrol if I depress the clutch while the engine is running?

  10. #10
    Rusted abhijeet080808's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    BLR/GHY/MAS
    Posts
    2,579
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by svjhonda View Post
    ^
    Slight correction:
    Unless you wind the throttle, no fuel gets sucked in, because the needle closes the fuel valve. So even in there is petrol in the float bowl, and throttle is closed, no fuel enters the manifold.
    (I think it works this way, correct if I'm wrong)

    For Fi you're spot on.
    Actually inside a carb, there are various circuits for air-fuel mixture to flow. Even when the throttle is closed, the idle circuit will still supply fuel to the engine. And, when the throttle is closed suddenly at high rpm, extra vacuum is created. This results in extra fuel flow thru the idle circuit.

    Quote Originally Posted by moeed View Post
    I have a query. Does a bike consume more petrol if I depress the clutch while the engine is running?
    No. It should be the same.
    Your biking tells a lot about the person you are!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •