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Kawasaki Ninja 250R

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  • Originally posted by invincible2110 View Post
    dropped the bike twice at low speeds (10-20km/hr)...not a single scratch on the bike..thanks to my crash kit.
    Which crash kit did you pick up dude? And is it a no-cut? I was interested in the Shogun No-Cut crash kit but to fix that, I have to grind the counter shaft cover. Didn't want to grind or cut anything so I dropped the idea.

    Originally posted by n_venki_2001 View Post
    Is the brakes of Ninja too good or too bad? As I was unable to understand what made it slip?
    The brakes on the ninja are by far the best I have experienced but then this is the first performance bike i own and ride.

    Originally posted by bluevolt View Post
    I've had vehicles stopping in front of me at high speeds and I do the tap-release-tap-release-tap thing on my front brake while keeping the rear brake mildly pressed.
    Thats exactly how ABS works. While on the ninja I have inculcated the habit of using the front brakes with only my 2 fingers (index and middle) and press-release, press-release so i dont lock up the wheel. This technique, highly recommended even by Nick Ienatsch (author of sport riding techniques), helps save riders from nasty incidents as in panic braking one would by instinct grab the brake lever with all fingers.

    I had a nasty front wheel speed wobble yesterday and came out of it unscathed although pretty shaken. I accelerated to around 80k's and was negotiating a turn. The bike was not completely straight or parallel to the ground and another biker was riding across the road... almost perpendicular to the traffic and not with the flow of other vehicles.

    I jabbed and relased the front brake thrice (without touching the rear brake lever) and slowed down to manageable speeds so i could avoid the obstruction in my path and steer away safely. But it wasnt easy. It happened by instinct and so fast. All i could see was this biker in front of me around 10-15 feet away, braking initiated, 3 loud deep screeches, his face cringing and body bracing for impact, while my front wheel wobbled with every jab of the brake and straightened with every release. This helped me slow down very quickly and also since i didnt lock up continuously i didnt fall. When it was over I was shocked that i continued to jab the brake and release it involuntarily even with the lockup.... i was almost frozen except for my 2 fingers. Sounds easy but i was unloading bricks at this time

    Originally posted by gouravkatyal View Post
    the front shouldn't have dived unless the front brakes were pressed completely and held that way...
    +1 to that. Never keep the lever pressed. Use only 2 fingers to brake and release it immediately and jab again. Repeat this very quickly and you will shed speed instantly and still have control of the bike.

    Originally posted by jd666 View Post
    Im guessing you applied the rear too hard, because whats normal rear brake application in any bike, is slightly on the higher side on the 250R.
    I only use the edge of my shoe to tap the rear brake as a wee bit of pressure can lock the rear and this can be distastrous.
    Last edited by n_aditya; 06-28-2010, 12:24 PM.
    ATGATT - Because hospital ceilings are boring !!!

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    • Originally posted by n_aditya View Post
      The bike was not completely straight or parallel to the ground


      Lmao, ain't that a good thing that the bike wasn't parrallel to the ground?

      Well personally i prefer using the this technique of braking as well but its regarded by many as incorrect however its worked very well for me till now. In fact even in one of our dedicated braking threads some one has majorly ridiculed this method. Good to know that its not just me who does this
      respect ma authoritae!!

      sigpic
      • 2006 Pulsar 180 dtsi
      • 2011 r15 V 2.0

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      • Completion of 12,000 kms / 3rd service

        Hello folks,

        I haven't been visiting this thread for a while now. But I have some feedback that you all might be interested.

        My Ninja stands at 12,000 kms. I completed the third service late last week. The service didn't have any unplanned part replacements. It cost INR 3,100 which includes all raw materials, labor charges and taxes. The tread on the rear tire is almost gone. A change has been recommended at INR 8,500 for the rear tire alone. The front still looks good for another 5,000 kms easily.

        I replaced the brake pads about 1,000 kms before which cost roughly about INR 2,200.

        Any one else around the same mark? Any feedback on wear and tear?
        sigpic

        Thrills of Touring

        A touring blog with tons of bike trips across India!

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        • Originally posted by n_aditya View Post
          Never keep the lever pressed. Use only 2 fingers to brake and release it immediately and jab again. Repeat this very quickly and you will shed speed instantly and still have control of the bike.
          Keep the lever pressed till it gets hard,
          tapping and releasing it is wrong method when it comes to motorcycles, Folks in the US taught this to blokes who couldn't control Car.

          The feedback from the lever/tires should be able to communicate the traction available.
          this is what i found at few forums--

          Mr. Y--(advise to those who favor pumping)

          wow you're not serious are you? who or where did you get the idea to do something that dangerous and innefective?

          First of all the shit they taught car drivers a couple decades ago to pump the brake is stupid but aimed at people who are not really competent enough to control a car.

          When you apply the brakes on a motorcycle in a gradual and firm manner. While braking with the bike straight up and down in dry weather you squeeze the lever smoothly and can do so all the way until the lever goes hard. Do not try and pulse the lever.

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          • Originally posted by sheelpriye View Post
            Folks in the US taught this to blokes who couldn't control Car.

            First of all the shit they taught car drivers a couple decades ago to pump the brake is stupid but aimed at people who are not really competent enough to control a car.

            While braking with the bike straight up and down in dry weather you squeeze the lever smoothly and can do so all the way until the lever goes hard. Do not try and pulse the lever.
            Well the pumping action is exactly what ABS does. The system brakes and then releases the pressure when there is a slight hint of wheel locking. Maybe these blokes developed the ABS technology . (no offence meant bro ).

            On the other hand, I agree that you need to press the brake firmly enough but not so much that the wheel locks. But at times when you need to shed speed and the wheel locks with firm pressure what'll you do? keep the lever pressed or release and press again?

            Well the other day it worked for me. Maybe luck was on my side.
            ATGATT - Because hospital ceilings are boring !!!

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            • Originally posted by n_aditya View Post
              I agree that you need to press the brake firmly enough but not so much that the wheel locks. But at times when you need to shed speed and the wheel locks with firm pressure what'll you do? keep the lever pressed or release and press again?
              Yes, keep it pressed till you are losing traction/the lever becomes hard/your instinct tells you to back-off and then start braking again.

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              • Originally posted by sheelpriye View Post
                Yes, keep it pressed till you are losing traction/the lever becomes hard/your instinct tells you to back-off and then start braking again.
                Thats exactly what i was suggesting. Maybe i didnt express my thoughts well enough. My bad. When i said pump the brakes i meant press firmly and release when you feel like you're losing the traction and brake again.
                ATGATT - Because hospital ceilings are boring !!!

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                • @xinfii - from what i learnt from the service engineer 12-14k kms is the normal lifespan of the tyres. Though i think it would be best to look at other brands now, rather than going with IRC for grippier rubber.


                  My offerings to the gods of speed -

                  - KTM Duke 200
                  - Yamaha RXZ 5 speed


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                  • i guess Pirelli is best option wat say?
                    M3:15

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                    • Originally posted by jd666 View Post
                      Though i think it would be best to look at other brands now, rather than going with IRC for grippier rubber.
                      Originally posted by worrisomebear View Post
                      i guess Pirelli is best option wat say?
                      I'm listening... Any other options?
                      sigpic

                      Thrills of Touring

                      A touring blog with tons of bike trips across India!

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                      • ^^ thats exactly what i am searching for. Some people really liked the bridgestones for the ninja.. but how to get em in india?


                        My offerings to the gods of speed -

                        - KTM Duke 200
                        - Yamaha RXZ 5 speed


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                        • Any specific comparison with the IRC stocks? I really like them a lot.
                          sigpic

                          Thrills of Touring

                          A touring blog with tons of bike trips across India!

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                          • I've been to the track only once... however my experience with the IRCs was pretty good. It was quite grippy... the foot pegs defined my limit of leaning.

                            Even the experienced Riders at the track were pretty surprised with the "stock tyres" as they were quite sticky.

                            There maybe stickier tyres.. but need to test them on the track to be sure.

                            What does Tenhut have to say abt this??
                            sigpicI feel like Clark Kent on the streets riding the Pulsar, On the track.. with my Ninja.. I feel like Superman.

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                            • I neither ride a ninja nor any other Higher capacity bikes... but i completely agree with Rohan...

                              @harikeshpk-- if u are classifying indian roads as gravel/ non-tarmac roads.. then isn't it true that when u tap your front brake hard for the first time u wouldn't even get time to release it, because till that time u front will get washed off...

                              TOUROGRAPHY : Read my other blogs here


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                              Its not that Number of posts that matters, its the number of Kilometers that does and how you do those kms that matters....

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                              • Originally posted by xinfii View Post
                                Any specific comparison with the IRC stocks? I really like them a lot.
                                I think the IRCs do fine for normal riding and touring. I have zero experience on track and cannot comment. I think the grip in wet was pretty good.

                                Originally posted by TenHut View Post
                                OMG...sorry but tap-release-tap is the worst kinda braking you can do on bikes. Seriously, it will only destabilize the bike. You are supposed to use the brake levers as a "regulator" and not as an on-off "switch".
                                You start with gentle pressure on the front lever gradually giving the lever hell. When you apply gentle pressure the weight of the bike shifts forward. The front tyre now gets more contact patch to take more braking input. Thats the only reason why you should be gentle first and then you MUST go on increasing the braking( with more contact patch the tyre has enough braking traction to take a lot of braking abuse).

                                Grabbing the lever in panic braking doesnt allow the front contact patch to widen and hence the front skids. Its not because the force was too much. The same force if applied after making sure of the front contact patch will stop the bike without the front skidding.

                                So I suppose if you have excess tyre pressure at the front, you would lose traction under heavy braking?

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