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Thread: Interviews of Prominent Personalities of the industry.

  1. #11
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    Default Hero to roll out first bike without Honda technology by FY14

    Source : ET

    India's largest two-wheeler maker Hero MotoCorpBSE 0.26 % today said it will launch the first product with its own technology by 2013-14 as it presses ahead the solo journey since parting ways with Japan's Honda.

    Besides, the company will be introducing its bikes inAfrica and Latin America in the fourth quarter of this fiscal by customising the existing ones for these markets.

    "We have technology partners like EBR, AVL and Engines Engineering. A lot of collaborations is already taking place and we will be launching the first product with our own IPR through these collaborations by 2013-14," Hero MotoCorp Senior Vice President (Marketing and Sales) Anil Dua told reporters here.

    The company will roll out many more such products in 2014-15, he added.

    Dua, however, declined to comment on details such as in which segment the first product will be launched.

    "With EBR, we are focusing on the premium bikes, while with AVL and Engines Engineering, we are focusing in the other segments. We also have our own R&D, focusing on new product development," he said.

    Last month, the company had roped in Italian two-wheeler design firm Engines Engineering to partner with it in bringing next-generation product line-up.

    Earlier, it entered into technology sourcing pact with US-based Erik Buell Racing (EBR) as it looked to strengthen presence in the high-end bike segment. Later, it also tied up with Austrian engine developer AVL.

    Talking about its export markets, Dua said: "We are going to look at the customers in African and Latin American markets and are going to tailor-made for them."

    The company is looking at the motorcycle taxi segment in Africa, therefore, "we have to do customisation of products in our existing portfolio to suit that market", he added.

    Dua also said the company is looking beyond Africa and Latin America in order to increase its sales volume globally as part of its plans to sell 10 million units in the next five years with exports to be about 10 per cent of its total sales.

    Talking about the upcoming festive season, he said: "The market is down, but usually during the festive season sales pick up. It is unlikely that we will have a stupendous double-digit growth during the festive season, but I do believe it will be a single-digit growth."

    During the July-September period, the overall industry sales were down by five per cent and Hero MotoCorp had adjusted its "production by two lakh units", he added.

    "...but going forward, with sales picking up, the company expects its plants to run in full capacity during the third quarter," Dua said.

  3. #13
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    Default Hero set to launch own bike sans Honda tech in 2013

    NEW DELHI: Nearly a-year-and-a-half after splitting with long-time partner Honda Motor of Japan, homegrown Hero group of Munjals is close to scripting a solo ride as it will launch its first bike, sans Honda technology, next year. The two-wheeler will be built by Hero's newly-established in-house R&D set-up that will work in tandem with the company's three overseas technology partners.
    "We are working aggressively on this front and the first Hero-developed product should be out in 2013-14," Anil Dua, Sr V-P (marketing & sales) at Hero MotoCorp Ltd, told TOI here.
    Hero, that has the option of using Honda's badging and technology till June 2014, has been working over-time to shed its association with its erstwhile Japanese partner. The company has dropped the Honda tag from its products earlier than scheduled and is focusing on quick independent product rollout. The new products will include motorcycles and scooters and are expected to be across the price spectrum of the two-wheeler industry.

    Hero's R&D set-up is still in a fledgling stage as the company develops a full-blown facility in Rajasthan with an investment of Rs 400 crore. The new facility, spread over a 250-acre area, will employ over 500 engineers and will be operational in the second half of next year. Apart from its own set-up, Hero has also sticthed up ties with US-based Erik Buell Racing (EBR), Austrian engine developer AVL and Italian two-wheeler design firm Engines Engineering. "Our R&D will be doing the lion's share as far as the development of the bike is concerned," Dua said.
    Hero and Honda had been promoter partners in the vastly-successful JV, Hero Honda Motors Ltd (HHML), that lasted for 26 years before heading for splitsville in 2011. Analysts had doubted Hero's ability to roll out new products on its own after the exit of Honda as the Japanese company was the sole technology supplier to the JV.
    Dua, however, said the new independent products from the Hero stable will be as efficient as the company's existing products. "We will meet our own proven standards in terms of manufacturing quality, durability, re-sale value, fuel efficiency and running cost." Hero's solo strategy comes in as Honda has been expanding aggressively in the market. The company -- through its fully-owned subsidiary Honda Motorcycle and Scooters India (HMSI) - has already launched a 110cc bike 'Dream Yuga' that is in direct competition with Hero's best-sellers Splendor and Passion models as well others from Bajaj Auto. Hero's sales in the first-half of this fiscal are under pressure just as HMSI has witnessed a big surge in volumes.
    Hero's volumes in the April-September 2012-13 period are down 3% at 28.94 lakh units just as HMSI saw numbers go up by 49% 12.90 lakh units.

    Source: Hero set to launch own bike sans Honda tech in 2013 - The Times of India

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    Two wheeler major Bajaj Auto clocked highest ever three wheeler monthly sales in month of October this year. The companys total sales of vehicles for the month stood at 4.11 lakh units.



    Rajiv Bajaj, managing director, Bajaj Auto told CNBC-TV18 that October 2012 was the second best month ever in our history of the company. "Export markets have stabilized, but what has contributed to this growth is the domestic market," he added.
    The company sold about 25,000 three wheelers in the domestic market which is also an all-time high.



    Going ahead, Bajaj Auto expects the sales momentum to continue in the festive season (October November) and in the wedding season (December) as well. "October and November will look good this year as compared to last year, especially, November-to-November because last year the festive season was over in October," he elaborated.

    Below is the edited transcript of Bajajs interview with CNBC-TV18.

    Q: Can you detail the October sales numbers?

    A: We had a very good month. It was the second best month ever in our history. We did a total of 411,000 motorcycles and three wheelers. Out of that, total motorcycles were about 361,000, it is the second highest number of motorcycles that we have ever sold. We did over 50,000 three wheelers, the highest three wheeler sales for any month.

    Q: 50,000 is 10 percent higher than what we were expecting. Does that mean all your problems are behind you from Sri Lanka, Egypt etc.?

    A: I would say yes and the export markets have stabilized, but what has contributed to this growth is the domestic market. We have done about 25,000 three wheelers in the domestic market which is also a kind of all-time high for us.

    Exports have been about 27,000 three wheelers, so it is not remarkable, but we are grateful that it has recovered nicely. Our domestic motorcycle sales at over 260,000 have also been the highest ever. We were looking for some positive signs from the domestic market and we saw them in the last month.

    Q: Can you just break up this 3.61 lakh number for motorcycles?

    A: We have about 62,000 of Boxer, which has continued to do extremely well especially in Africa. We have close to 60,000 of Platina. A 155,000 of Discover riding on the back of the success of the new Discover 125 ST of which we did 45,000 in October, so that was the highlight for me. We did about 85,000 of all Pulsar motorcycles put together.

    Q: How has November started off, the first bit of this festive month?

    A: It looks good. The momentum continues. October and November will look good this year as compared to last year, especially, November-to-November because last year the festive season was over in October, so November will look artificially better.
    We will continue to see some momentum in December, because the marriage season in particular is very strong in the north all through December this year. That does contribute towards better sales. This is going to be a reasonable quarter for the industry.

    Q: Given what you have seen in the market and also what you have read from the monthly numbers of your peers, the monthly numbers do you get the sense that through October-November you will come out gaining market share or are your peers also growing at the same pace?

    A: Between April and September we did gain about 3 or 4 percentage points. We moved up to about 27.5 percent in the domestic market in terms of motorcycles, 35 percent overall. I am not sure we will make further gains immediately, although I would like to.
    From what I can see Honda is also gaining share, Hero is losing share, the others are stagnant. When we put our new amazing 100cc bike out in the market in January, we will once again begin to gain some share in Q4.


    Source: Export mkt has stabilised; worst is behind us: Bajaj Auto - CNBC-TV18

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    Default Piaggio's top-down strategy

    Source : Business Standard

    While Vespa, the most expensive scooter in India, will remain a niche player, the Italian firm wants the iconic brand to create a buzz about its less expensive scooters that would follow soon

    When Vespa returned to India, the excitement at the launch event in late April this year was understandable. After all, Piaggio Vehicles, the Italian three- and four- wheeler maker, was bringing back one of the most iconic brands in two-wheelers after a gap of 13 years.


    The pricing, however, came as a surprise. At Rs 66,666, the retro-looking Vespa became the most expensive scooter in India. It is 32 per cent costlier than the Honda Activa, Indias largest-selling scooter.


    The question was will it be able to survive in a fiercely competitive Indian market where much has changed in the intervening 13 years? The sales figures have not been encouraging: At 18,000 units till October, Vespa, a Hollywood hot favourite, commands a share of a little over one per cent of the domestic scooter market, which saw cumulative sales of over 1.7 million units till last month.
    That may mean a lacklustre performance, but Piaggio executives at the companys headquarters in Pune insist that Vespa is the iPhone of the scooter market and its still early days. What they are happy about is the right levels of excitement that Vespa has generated.


    Ravi Chopra, chairman and managing director, Piaggio Vehicles says, Our strategy was very clear. We wanted to create a premium space in the scooter category, which till now did not exist. The Vespa meets the needs of the youth who wish to indulge in luxury but do not have a product to buy.


    Chopra is correct. India saw over 2.5 million scooter sales in the last financial year posting a growth of 25 per cent over the previous year. However, unlike motorcycles with multiple sub-segments, scooters sell in a narrow price band with most available for under Rs 52,000.


    Presently scooters do not have a niche brand in India, while motorcycles offer a wide variety of products above Rs 1 lakh. In a market where scooters typically score high on their utility purpose (such as carrying load) than on its aspirational value, Piaggio seems to heading in the opposite direction with Vespa, thus trying to create a niche brand albeit on lower volumes.


    Trying to create a premium segment is not easy, one has to be patient. Sometime segments are created over 10-15 years and sometimes it gets created in 10-15 months. It took Bajaj 10 years to create the Pulsar in the premium segment. When you are catering to a niche luxury segment, you have to be satisfied with a lower volume growth, adds Chopra.


    The slow ramp-up and limited retail reach of the dealers (the company is yet to tap the eastern part of the India) has also led to lower volumes of the Vespa.


    However, it would be wrong to assume that the company has kept the volumes of the Vespa artificially low to maintain its exclusivity. Piaggio is, in fact, in a production ramp-up mode at its plant in Baramati, Maharashtra.


    We have a major expansion plan. We have appointed 55 handpicked Vespa dealers. The experience a buyer gets in a Vespa dealership is the same he would get in a boutique. If I were a mass market manufacturer of this product, I would be selling 25,000 Vespas a month, but that would not do any good to the product, adds Chopra.


    The Honda Activa sells around 80,000-100,000 units a month while the Hero Motocorp duo of Pleasure and Maestro sell in excess of 55,000 units a month, as per company data. Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India is the leader in the scooter segment with a share of 50 per cent.


    Life beyond Vespa Piaggio, however, is also looking at life beyond Vespa. The Indian market will see the launch of an affordable range of mass market scooters from the Italian company next year, and the new range will not be under the Vespa brand. Variants of the Vespa scooter is also scheduled to hit markets next year.


    Piaggio knows its a relatively unknown brand in the two-wheeler space competing with the likes of Honda, Suzuki, Hero and Yamaha, and needed to generate some excitement first. Thats where the Vespa comes in. Its a top-down approach: while the Vespa will remain the centrestage brand, cheaper products will follow after the company gets into the consumers mindspace.


    The company cannot do business with just one product and therefore we are very seriously contemplating add-on products. It is from these products that we will be seeking large volumes. The Vespa will remain a premium product, elaborates Chopra.


    Competition though is not losing sleep as everyone knows the headroom for scooter growth in India is tremendous. More than 62 per cent of the domestic scooter market is dominated by the Japanese brands - Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha.


    Piaggios entry wont dent the market share of anybody but will bring in additional volumes, says a senior executive of a Delhi-based manufacturer.

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    Last edited by antz.bin; 11-22-2012 at 02:12 AM.
    Advice is a form of nostalgia.
    Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it's worth.

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    Thumbs up Like Harley-Davidson, Royal Enfield hopes to further bolster the brand with its foray

    Aneesh Shivanekar / Mumbai Nov 30, 2012, 00:48 IST

    Riding gear is to motorcycling what chips are to grilled fish. They complement each other so perfectly that youd rather not have it any other way. More than any other brand in history, it was American motorcycle manufacturer Harley-Davidson that introduced the motorcycle crowd to branded riding gear way back in the day. It is believed that originally, the apparel was procured and sold at a dealer level but Harley-Davidson realised that it was sitting on a veritable goldmine, having one of the biggest, most brand-loyal consumer bases in all of history. An official line was initiated proudly wearing the Harley-Davidson logo. The Milwaukee-based firm did such an exceedingly good job of it that soon, the riding apparel, accessories and aftermarket parts business of Harley-Davidson started adding a fat chunk to their profits.
    It is a known fact that no other motorcycling brand sells as much factory-approved aftermarket gear per customer. So, in addition to its primary business of building and selling motorcycles, Harley-Davidsons aftermarket business added a new, profitable business arm while being the best, most kosher form of brand promotion ever.
    The automobile sector is no longer about just the mechanical experience of owning a machine; its now more to do with the relationship that is created through this ownership. An extension of this experience is our merchandising model, says Anoop Prakash, MD, Harley-Davidson India.
    It has been a part of our overall marketing strategy to introduce H-D merchandise in India as we are not just selling bikes here but inculcating a lifestyle. When a person buys a Harley, he/she tends to also gravitate towards a Harley look. Indian customers now expect to radiate this look by gearing up in a unique Harley-Davidson way and our merchandising model helps them achieve this goal, he adds.
    Looking at the Indian context, a lot of parallels can be drawn between the erstwhile British brand Royal Enfield and Harley-Davidson. In fact, as a brand, it is older than Harley-Davidson which is closing in on 110 years. Royal Enfields entire motorcycle line-up has a strong nostalgia factor, its customer base is notably loyal and as expected, it sells the experience rather than just a product. Branded apparel, then, is all but a natural extension. The Chennai firm has recently introduced a slew of products incorporating the brand catering to its new and existing customer base and those who would like to enter the fold.
    Riding gear is highly specialised apparel, often made with cutting-edge technology combining the lightest yet strongest of materials and textiles.
    Venki Padmanabhan, CEO, Royal Enfield says, Royal Enfield has been a pioneer of leisure motorcycling in India and a brand that has always promoted safe riding. Being a cult brand in the motorcycle space, extending to riding gear and accessories was also a natural step.
    But its not so easy. Quality motorcycling gear is often far too expensive for the average rider and Royal Enfield needed to nail the price of the gear while retaining the quality expected from a big brand like theirs. Having priced the gear a trifle above entry-level Indian-made gear, theyre targeting every current owner as well as future customers whod like to own a Royal Enfield some day in the future. Anyone who aspires to own a Royal Enfield or loves the brand is also a target customer for our accessories and apparel, says Padmanabhan.
    With jackets starting at Rs 6,999 and helmets at Rs 2,999, the kit scores reasonably well on the value-for-money scale. On the other hand, Harley-Davidson being a much more premium brand, positions its gear at a higher price bracket, though the outlook remains similar. H-D dealerships are open to everyone who wants to connect with the brand, for us all customers are the same - be it the one buying a Fat Boy or a T-shirt. For us its important to get potential/existing customers to be a part of the overall Harley-Davidson community, says Prakash.
    According to Royal Enfield, the response has been tremendous. Its current line-up includes armoured textile jackets, leather jackets, riding pants and jeans with protection built-in, gloves, helmets, balaclavas, goggles and riding boots. A good chunk of the kit is procured from world-renowned brands. For example, Nanini of Italy supplies the eyewear, AGV of Italy manufactures the helmets, Spanish brand Buff produces the multi-functional balaclava and American brand Invista supplies a patented fabric called Cordura for the riding denims. Other kit - like the jackets, boots and the textile pants - don't have such big-brand backing and are sourced from Pakistan and China.
    Currently available only as retail products at company dealerships, the scaling of both the line-up and the distribution networks is solely dependent on the response. We will expand and strengthen the distribution network in a phased manner basis the demand and newer products that we keep introducing over a period of time, says Padmanabhan. But is it looked upon purely as a branding exercise or does Royal Enfield see a viable business model there, a la Harley-Davidson? Riding gear and accessories are a natural brand extension for Royal Enfield. However, it is a viable business venture for us as well.

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    Default Will Pawan Kant Munjals mega makeover plan rev up Heros mojo?

    Source : ET

    Rather than dealerships and factories of Hero MotoCorp, its CEO & MD Pawan Kant Munjal is probably a more familiar sight on the Daytona race track fussing over his 1190 RS Erik Buell Racing (EBR) bike in the American Motorsports Association's (AMA) Superbike championship. Hero has recently forged an alliance with EBR for high-end bikes and sponsors the EBR team in America's premier motorcycle racing circuit. The 58-year-old big daddy of the world's largest two-wheeler company by volume is gearing up to go global at a time when doubting Thomases point at dipping domestic sales, predicting an uncertain future for the two-wheeler company. The CEO of a rival company says: "Hero is in a place where Bajaj was many years ago -without a technology partner. The way things are moving in the motorcycles market, it's soon going to be a two-horse race between Honda and Bajaj. Honda on its own is a far more dangerous player than Hero Honda."




    Munjal's new Hero is a W.I.P. Since the Honda JV break up in 2010, he and his A-team have put in a lot of hard work adding teeth to the organization. Over a planning exercise in Delhi's Grand Hotel after the split, Munjal showed his men The King's Speech, where King Edward VI corrects a stammering problem with the right inputs. "The moral of The King's Speech is that nothing really is impossible - if you get after something and have the conviction, you will definitely achieve your goals," he says.


    In April-October 2012, Hero MotoCorpBSE 0.28 % sold 3.4 million units and registered a negative growth of 1.83% over the same period the previous year. Bajaj AutoBSE -1.13 % too shrank by 4.5% in the same period, while Honda Motorcycles and Scooters ( HMSI) grew by 47%, albeit on a much lower base of 1.5 million units. In the fast growing scooter segment, Hero has a 17% market share, while Honda with 49.3% market share is by far the leader. The contest is rather close between Hero and TVS for the number two position.


    What's going on? "When Honda came out with a 100% subsidiary in India (HMSI in 1999), they manufactured only scooters for the first 5 years of their operation since that was the deal with us," says Munjal, echoing how he fended off Honda's challenge in motorbikes long enough for Hero Honda to consolidate and add teeth to volumes. But the hiatus proved a boon for Honda to develop a market for scooters at a time when the segment was sliding. For Hero, it will now indeed be difficult to unseat its established erstwhile partner in a rapidly growing segment.


    Another significant shift can be noticed in the traction across the 125cc segment, a sort of aspirational uptrading by customers. Traditionally, Hero has championed the 100cc segment and rules the roost with twothirds of the market with winners, such as the Splendor and Passion. "In a full year, Splendor sells about a third of our volumes," claims Dua. But over the years, Bajaj has built up capabilities in the 125cc space while Hero battles on with three offerings. "Hero's relative advantage will get whittled away as the competition already has credible products in the 125cc space," says a recent report from CitiGroup. Even in the premium segment, Hero's heroics come unstuck. Its market share was down to 7% in August from 24% five quarters ago. Blame it on the slowdown for now, but as the segment continues to grow, Hero may have to bite the bullet from Bajaj (40% market share) and Honda (17%).


    Nevertheless, it's worth noting that with approximately 70% share in the most popular 100cc segment of the two-wheeler industry, Hero has penetrated deep into the hinterland with almost 5,400 touch points encompassing dealerships, service and spare parts outlets and authorized reps of dealers, while nearest competitor Bajaj stands a distant second with 3,500 touch points. "We will be adding another 400 touch points to our network by the end of this year (taking the total to 5800)," says Anil Dua, Senior Vice President-Sales & Marketing, Hero MotoCorp, when grilled on the Honda challenge.


    With the success of the Hero Honda venture behind him, Dua revs up for a repeat performance. "I'm not very concerned about market shares going up and down," he says matter-of-factly, pointing to a newfound vigor post the split with Honda. "I'm looking ahead." In a volume-driven market like India where competition is hotting up, despite being market leaders, Hero has stepped up its efforts to go overseas. "We've created an international business division with 16 people as of now and want to grow our international business five times in five years," says Dua. Earlier, Hero Honda had just two people in its overseas division and exported to four countries-Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Colombia-accounting for a mere 3% of its annual turnover. Today, the thinking has changed even though the turning of the tide can take longer.


    While unveiling the new brand identity in London's O2 Arena last year, Munjal outlined the vision of his company through the 'Power of 10'. Simply put, in five years, he's eyeing $10 billion in revenues with 10 million units, and at least 10% of the total volumes coming from the international business. Very carefully, the company has recalibrated the nomenclature from 'exports' to 'international business', since it harbours hopes of setting up manufacturing facilities in some of the newer geographies it is venturing into. "We've appointed distributors in Africa, Central America and Latin America and are first tapping those markets where we believe our products will deliver," claims Munjal in the backdrop of Bajaj Auto's successful foray in the overseas markets, which now forms one-third of its total business by volume.


    If international business is the new hottie in Team Hero, so is its planned Rs 400 crore R&D centre in Kukas, Rajasthan. Since tech was a hand-me-down from Honda, the group honchos are passionate about innovation adding teeth to their capabilities. Today, the R&D team is 325-strong from 71 during the split and the plan really is to take it to 500 in the mid term.


    Along with Erik Buell Racing of the USA, Hero has also tied up with AVL of Austria for engine technologies and Italian design firm Engines Engineering (EE) for end-toend two-wheeler design solutions -who are working together to develop the next-generation Hero twowheelers. Hero is reportedly working on several models ranging from low engine displacement to higherpowered motorcycles and scooters.


    However, the first bike on a new platform to hit the market will be a 250cc motorcycle by the third or fourth quarter of FY2014-15. Ever since Hero separated from Honda, the company has launched only four products, which could all be termed as Honda's babies in terms of technology. The Honda effect may well continue with a couple of fresh launches in the next fiscal.


    But does that augur well for the group when the competition has the firepower to deliver more? "In the first 15 years of this company (1985-2000), we launched only six models. From 2001 to 2005, the company launched 15 models. Each year now, companies launch on an average 8-10 models," says Ravi Sud, Senior VP & CFO, Hero MotoCorp. Clearly, Hero falls woefully short of market expectations in the near term.


    But the new tie-ups will surely come into force after that and Munjal is upbeat. "The premium segment is currently on the drawing board, well beyond the design board, and we've seen mock-ups and clay models....in 2014, we would have a completely new portfolio." It is learnt that the first bike from Hero will be sport a 250cc engine. But skeptics demur as analysts question the effectiveness of the tie-ups, save AVL, a trusted name in engine technologies. "While EBR is a boutique, EE is not a name to reckon with in auto design," says an analyst requesting anonymity.


    There is also hint of an apprehension of a complete tech overhaul from the existing Japanese platform to the western domain. Dua dispels that fear. "Instead of completely replacing what our erstwhile partner has done, we need to know about engines, we need inputs on designing and styling, we need to know about racing," he says adding that currently, Hero engineers are working with these partners to "co-develop" the company's future SKUs.


    Clearly, the competitors and market watchers know Hero still has a strong franchise and the massive transformation exercise will build a strong platform. "Hero has seen 70 years of evolution under Brij Mohan Munjal. Their understanding of the market is very deep. The competition can have better technology but that's not sufficient to win the market. Therefore, dislodging the current lead of Hero will be difficult for the competitors," says Ramdeo Agarwal, Jt. MD, Motilal OswalBSE 1.97 %. "In this very sector, there have been past instances of promoters doing well, inspite of their JV partners walking out. So there is no reason why Hero can't repeat that," adds Ravi Sardana, EVP, Securities.


    Market watchers say Munjal's chemistry with stakeholders may not be as strong as his father's, Chairman Brij Mohan Munjal, around whom legends of benevolence have been woven. A source even said that once when an employee needed blood, it was Sr. Munjal who came to his rescue by donating his own blood. And the same thread of deep relationships runs through the dealers and distributors as well. Just when CD was interviewing Hero executives Brij Mohan Munjal and his wife passed through the reception of the Hero MotoCorp HQ. A couple of dealers standing at the reception offered him belated Diwali gifts and touched his feet. He blessed them and asked how they were doing, whether they faced any hiccups-all in first name terms.


    However, the larger question is whether Hero will remain a twowheeler company. "It's about mobility and if Hero MotoCorp is a twowheeler company today, it could be anything tomorrow," says Dua hinting at larger plays in auto. And he believes that unity of command allows room for such adventures. "It enables you to do visioning, missioning, give a strategic thrust, alignment and then a plan to go for it and execute that plan," he says. With a heat wave as severe as one is witnessing in the two-wheeler category, Hero has a tough battle at hand. The overseas thrust may be one way to battle the crisis but a category leap calls for another round of introspection.

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