Since '02 xBhp is different things to different people. From a close knit national community of bikers to India's only motorcycling lifestyle magazine and a place to make like minded biker friends. We have one common religion - Bikeism.

T-shirt
Magazine
Castrol Power 1

Always wear a helmet.

Our Partners



User Tag List

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 91
Like Tree166Likes

Thread: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

  1. #1
    Rusted shv18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The North East-India
    Posts
    1,887
    Mentioned
    163 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Hi All,

    I guess this was INEVITABLE and perhaps now becoming a trend with me of owning and restoring pre-owned bikes!! But honestly i never thought that such an incident would take place in my life and that too so quickly!! i would like to thank a lot of members from this forum (and blame them too - directly and indirectly!!) for messing with my head that resulted in going for a bike... which until now was nowhere in the picture and then - bank balance drying up at the speed of light!

    So the list of 'culprits' are as follows (gentlemen please do take this in good humour ) @Divya Sharan , @AK3D , @gopakumar s pillai , @psr sir, @Akki4134 and @rreneav1987. Without a doubt i am indebted to all these members mentioned here for letting me finally focus my thoughts and get hold of a machine which i believe i now can begin my real riding adventures with.. I would like to thank @Sachinnair for sharing detailed longterm ownership experience with his "Midori" (link: https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/superbi...-now-sold.html) which provided a lot of data for us all to get an understanding of the vehicle i now had set my eyes on... thanks a lot buddy it really helped! I would also like to thank K.N.O.G (Kawasaki Ninja Owners group India) where like minded enthusiasts and passionate riders willingly and openly discuss and share their experience related to Ninja and other Kawasaki bikes (page link - https://www.facebook.com/groups/Ninj...?ref=bookmarks)

    Dear readers do note that this initial post is just a small 'gyst' of what happened, how it happened and the steps that were followed afterwards to get hold of my new acquisition. In this thread - I would like to share my experiences right from technical discussion, the restoration process to the little adventures/travelogues that follow afterwards which will allow all of you to possibly learn and have a hearty read too. I hope that in the long run this thread will end up benefitting us all through a series of discussion and perhaps allow someone/somebody - who earlier had doubts about moving up the CC ladder due to associated ownership & maintenance costs: to now have a fresh perspective about how one can have, "the pudding and eat it too!" If all goes well, I intend to break the myth and confirm that - barring a few items, owning such a motorcycle is really not a very expensive affair regardless of the brand one would like to own.

    I would also like to give a big shout out to the two Youtube heroes of mine who greatly influenced me in taking the leap of faith and the now the end result is happily resting in my garage:

    1) Tyler Hoover and his crazy adventures with owning and restoring his "Hoopty Fleet":



    and the other gentleman...

    2) Freddy 'Tavarish' Hernandez and his experiences of owning pre-owned luxury cars and DIYs related to restoring them for dirt cheap:



    Their respective vlogs shared over Youtube gave me the confidence that if such expensive pre-owned luxury cars can be restored/maintained for cheap, with a little wrestling and arm twisting the same should be possible in the land of "jugaadus" for a motorcycle as well right?? i hope i do end up being successful in this "little" mission of mine.

    So without further ado let us begin with the story...


    THE PRELUDE

    For those who are not aware, i have had a blissful 3 years of ownership experience with my trusted Honda CBR 250R "little bird". It taught me a lot about motorcycling, better understanding of troubleshooting and maintenance, took me places i thought it could never go to, darn reliable as Honda badge claims it to be, brought out the 'little inner tourer' in me and in general helped in creating a thread which i hope benefitted a lot of members in this forum and outside as well (Link: https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general...-cbr-250r.html). For the record, I was totally content with the performance of my CBR 250R and with the plethora of spares i had collected over the years in my garage, i believe i had enough "ammunition" in stock to run her to the ground in the near future (at least that was the intent!). However, it was my last stint to Nepal - a ride which changed everything for me! I slowly realised that sooner or later i was going to take touring/ADV riding quite seriously as a means of letting go, experience the unexplored places, meet people, culture and perhaps through this process re-discover myself in a new way.

    So as it happens with every rider... once you start covering greater distances on road, slowly but steadily the need for a purpose built vehicle with better ergonomics, more power (the obvious!! ), high speed cruising capability, reliability, dependability and quite a lot of other factors which your current steed may lack - one starts thinking about it. Though this thought had started creeping in my mind for a while, i had no serious intention of upgrading to a higher CC spec model as i had figured out that in the long run the category of motorcycle i would like to own was going to be either a sports tourer or a proper ADV motorcycle: something which allows me to visit places i thought i never could. I was randomly thinking about "in the near possible future" acquisition options in my garage: Kawasaki Versys 650, Honda Africa Twin, Triumph Tiger, Suzuki Vstrom etc. All of this sounded really good in my head... but as it happens my bank balance never agreed with me (like ever!!) . All of them were to the North of the price band i currently couldn't afford. The Ground realities and common sense most of the time strikes down such aspiration or dreams pretty quick.

    Thanks to the wonderful relationship one builds over time with passionate riders & members of XBHP, i randomly used to chat with many senior riders in the likes of @Divya Sharan , @AK3D , @gopakumar s pillai , @psr sir, @Akki4134 : talking about biking in general and the future plans of owning a motorcycle which could do everything and take me places. Divya bhai's experiences riding various SBKs through social platform made me feel very happy for him as i could literally sense the rush and thrill such motorcycles provide at least through our random chats and the stories shared by him. At the same time the "i wish i could too..." thought kept on bugging me as unfortunately in this part of North East India, such opportunities are not present at all.. Plus the scare of non-availability of spares, horror stories of SVCs, ownership and maintenance and associated costs related with such bikes kept the Head Vs Heart quotient in check for me for a while.

    While having one such discussion with @psr sir - he suggested the most apt candidate which if my bank balance agrees, i can perhaps consider looking around and may be start sending feelers too. Now as it happens - one should never ever share good "Yoda gyan" with a person suffering from OCMD (Obsessive Compulsive Motorcycle Disorder)!! Time and again while discussing about future sports tourer/ADV bike: Kawasaki Ninja 650 name kept on popping up quite a bit. Being a 649CC engine kept in production for over 20+ years and the crazy Kawasaki ingenuity with its engineering capabilities and "Toyota" like bulletproof build quality, Ninja 650 was actually one of the most reliable and practical 650CC sports-tourer motorcycle one can ask for in India. And thanks to being in the Indian market since 2011 and the latest revised model launches, there were plenty of pre-owned 650s which were up for grab and within a reasonable price. Now dear members, those of you who don't know much about Kawasaki, perhaps this video will give you an idea the kind of engineering prowess Kawasaki has in many fields and how they completely reshaped motorcycling industry even though they were probably the last entrant from Japan. They are simply a mad group of engineers having a field day, designing and producing some of the most powerful and rugged bikes in the market:



    For those who know me from my previous thread, i was bit apprehensive about taking a possible jump into the pre-owned SBK category as if for any reason i do end up getting a lemon: the cost of repairs/restoration might be in all probability ASTRONOMICAL!! Post Bajaj - Kawasaki split up, the horror stories of a simple oil change and basic service cost shooting up to crazy numbers, spares shortage for months etc. was a bit disconcerting for me let alone there were Zilch SVC of Kawasaki anywhere in North East. The closest one was based in West Bengal which was some 1000+kms away! But @psr sir assured me that through proper research and sourcing it is very much possible to own this practical motorcycle and maintain it too while not at all being dependent on Kawasaki India SVCs. After chatting with @Akki4134 and @rreneav1987 i realised that there were plenty of after market sellers/suppliers who were dealing with parts and spares related to Ninja 650 so if for any reason the SVC is not up to the job, it is possible to get hold of spares from other sources.

    My Biggest concern was with the lack of trained mechanics or rather i should say no mechanics in the North East who can deal with the possible complications of electrical and mechanical items with Ninja 650 as unlike in Metro cities in india, i was pretty much in an isolated place of North East India. So it was an obvious scare - what would happen, where would i be if something goes wrong or some critical component/part fails. But as always @psr sir assured me that given the experience i had gained on the single cylinder platform - Honda CBR 250R, transitioning from a 250 CC to a P-Twin 650 CC motor and in the process training a mechanic with common sense shouldn't be much of a hassle for me. I gave it a thought (day in and day out for at least 2-3 weeks if i might add) all thanks to Yoda gyan shared by @psr sir and the OCMD in me didn't let me be in peace! So slowly, the hunt for Ninja 650 had started - i kept on convincing myself that all i was doing was to just get a feel of the market - a pure market research. That i was not going to buy any vehicle let alone a Ninja 650 for a while, CBR 250R was plenty for all the application and trips i had planned for the near future... perhaps one fine day comes and i have a healthy bank balance, i shall then take the plunge and then get myself a good one... Oh and how wrong was i!!

    I decided as a part of my 'research' to keep my options open to Pan-India and within a reasonable imaginary budget with 10% additional mark-up cost being kept aside to restore the bike given that with any pre-owned vehicle it is expected that certain niggles or maintenance is bound to be present regardless of how new or old the vehicle may be or how little mileage it has clocked on the odometer over the duration of ownership by the current owner. I must thank @rreneav1987 who actively and rather selflessly shared ads of various pre-owned Ninjas across the country to help me get a feel of the pricing and also identify possible hidden gremlins and legal issues with paperwork/law and order. Of course @psr sir was constantly troubled with all the information i had collected while going through such adverts. This kept on going for a month which slowly resulted in my "market feel and test" mantra getting converted to a committed resolve that, "now no matter what happens i have to get a Ninja 650 of my own!!".. i guess the inner child in me just screamed "now or never" every time i went through a possible ad and then argued with everybody (including self!) about the positives and negatives of this potential financial bomb i was planning to drop on my own head!! Based on my experience with Honda CBR 250R, i was very clear that at no point of time would i accept a bike which was modded in any manner given the touring plans i had in mind so a bike which has been experimented upon by an unknown entity was on a complete no go list. I had decided to strictly abide by the two golden rules, "there is no replacement for displacement!" and "bone stock as it is from the factory" is the best platform one should have.

    After a month of random search, it just so happened that we stumbled upon one such advert of a Ninja 650: 2014 year make which had done just 6,800 kms on the ODO, was bone stock with no stupid ECU remaps, performance air filters nor Loud pipes dangling from bottom: in short a vehicle which at least from the description in the advert sounded a genuine one and the owner had given the required details in plain and factual manner. Incidentally it was from an adjoining state to Assam where i currently reside in... so i guess my stars somehow were aligned to at least go and check out this vehicle. After interacting with the owner over telephone, it was decided to come to a common acceptable location where both me and the seller can meet and then can do the needful. I had requested the owner to send me some more pics of the vehicle on my cellphone which would allow me to gauge the motorcycle better.





    Pic 1 & 2: some of the images shared of the potential Ninja 650 i was looking at.

    So 'D' day arrived when the seller agreed to meet at a common point. I along with my trusted friends started our drive to have a look at the vehicle in person and do the necessary verification of the documents, proper physical assessment of the bike and also a test ride to get a feel of the vehicle. After waiting for a bit in the said location, the owner arrived, the pleasantries were exchanged we then went ahead with the assessment of the vehicle. Unlike normally what other people/buyers would do, even before starting the bike - we first checked the documentation related to the vehicle. The owner was open and honest about the fact that this Ninja 650 was currently Hypothecated with a bank and that he had accidentally managed to drop it once which had scratched the RHS side of the fairing. On a closer inspection of the bike me and my friends confirmed that even though the scratch was present, the panel had not broken from anywhere and that a simple paint touch up could easily fix this.

    We then went ahead with the inspection of the motorcycle to look for any major accident damage to the chassis, alloy wheels bend/crack, fork damage, condition of the front and rear rotors, MID console to confirm the authenticity of the odometer reading, condition of the tires, chain & sprockets, brake rotors and pads etc. All looked genuine. We then went ahead with the test ride - which revealed that the vehicle was definitely due for a proper service as there was a burning smell emitting from the engine. The coolant through inspection of the reservoir tank also confirmed our suspicion that it was never replaced and needed an urgent overhaul.. The clutch lever was super hard to pull, handlebar was feeling heavy, rear fender had dog chew marks on it.. all in all i got the feeling that 'story so far...' was going to repeat itself with me all over again if i pick up this bike!! However, the engine was solid, building good torque and power, heck even the front rotors were sparingly used! The chain was never adjusted which confirmed that the mileage was genuine and it was a good platform to work upon and restore. After a bit of back and forth on the principle sum, we finally concluded the deal on an agreed pricing and a tentative date was set to do the formalities, make the payment and then collect the bike from the owner. What i liked about the whole interaction was that even though the bike was hypothecated, the owner was ok with me having a word with the manager of the bank to confirm the nature of the hypothecation and processes needed to get the vehicle transferred under my name should i decide to go ahead with the deal.





















    Pic 3 - 12: Vehicle inspected on the day of the meet. Note the paint scratch on the RHS side of the fairing. Everything had checked out: the front and rear brake rotors were in brand new condition. The OEM chain had not adjustment done to it which confirmed that this vehicle was sparingly used. Battery was found to be in good health and cranked the vehicle very easily.

    After a few weeks, the deal was finally done, the vehicle was now in my hands though I still had to wait for the bank to process the documents and provide the NOC clearance for the necessary ownership transfer to be done in my name but i could technically ride this bike back to my state with ease. The owner was kind enough to give the bike a thorough wash before sending her off with me. After a while, it suddenly hit me that i now had become an owner of a 649CC parallel twin, 72 BHP superbike (sports tourer actually) something which only about a month back was nowhere in my to do/to acquire list! I shared the news with all the respective gentlemen mentioned above and they were equally happy to see me getting hold of something - which a lot of riders do aspire but some give it up half way through and for some, the wait becomes an endless one due to various reasons.

    THE AFTERMATH

    On paper 72 BHP sounds pretty much puny compared to the likes of Busas, R1s and other SBK behemoths, but i had learned this long back (thanks to a thread shared by @ken cool da on XBHP: https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/superbi...-way-life.html) that when jumping up the ladder, one must respect the bike and incrementally test the speed and cornering capabilities of the motorcycle over a period of time and mileage or else the consequences will not be pleasant at all! So before commencing the return leg of the journey, i had mentally prepared myself to keep the right wrist under check and not to cross triple digit speeds for the first 1000-1500 kms at least as this would allow me to re-learn and train my responses to the workings of the Ninja 650.

    Thanks to the earlier muscle memory of riding CBR 250R, it is quite natural for one to apply the same amount of throttle actuation and gear VS RPM combo when riding. All this gave me a good shakedown when i just incidentally happened to glance upon the MID console meter below while riding her on the highway. Trust me for a person jumping from 26 BHP to 72 BHP - nothing prepares you for the amount of violence this 649 CC motor is capable of! In the blink of an eye when i thought i was doing sedate speeds of 60 - 80 kmph, the speedo was actually busy hurriedly rushing towards the north of 130+ kmph! She is so deceptively fast that one doesn't even realise that she is hitting those numbers till the engine note changes post 6,000 rpm and all hell breaks loose! One is literally pushed back and has to hold onto the handlebars for dear life. There was usable power almost everywhere! Even @ 40 kmph my Ninja 650 was able to pull easily on 6th gear all the way to 130+ kmph in a matter of seconds! I guess for a simpleton.. all this was too much to bear so now i had to make a conscious effort to keep a tab on the speedo and thus speeds under check. While cornering the steering felt quite heavy and i was not sure why. The vehicle kept on pulling towards left more than right which i suspected might have been due to fatter tires or as @psr sir suggested a possible aftermath of dual discs doing duty on front which increases the amount of rotational mass that makes steering dynamics bit different then that of Honda CBR 250R.













    Pic 13 - 18: My proud possession - Kawasaki Ninja 650.

    It took all my effort to consciously not let the motorcycle jump on the speedo to 100+ kmph mark which she could do even without breaking any sweat. By the time i had entered Assam's state border, it was night fall and one thing became apparently clear: the stock OEM headlights SUCK big time!! the visibility on low beam was pathetic and on high beam, well to put it gently - it was not at all inspiring. So this was definitely something i intended to address at a later stage. But all in all, this was definitely something different for a biker who all this while was conditioned for a single cylinder 250CC motorcycle. I did have had my share of experience riding N250, N300 and a 2009 R1 but all of that was long back when i was stationed in Mumbai. But over a period of time all that seemed to fade away and with the familiarity of a single cylinder for the last 24,000+ kms, your body does tend to get conditioned accordingly.


    Anyways, for the moment let us end this first post here. Shall share more parts of the ownership and restoration story as in when time permits.

    Until Then...


    Cheers,
    Last edited by shv18; 03-03-2018 at 08:06 PM. Reason: corrections
    A quote by a toilet, " use me well, keep me clean, i would never tell anybody whatever i have seen.." :P

  2. #2
    Moderator The Monk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Gurgaon/ Kanpur
    Posts
    10,019
    Mentioned
    435 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Ownership Thread Approved

    Congratulations Shivang
    Biking is not about what you have between your legs, its all about how well you use it!!!!!!!

    Give your details here if you want to help your fellow xBhpian stranded in your city

    Touring Blog: Cycling in Mongolia!

  3. #3
    psr
    psr is offline
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CHENNAI , TAMILNADU
    Posts
    5,805
    Mentioned
    678 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Icon7 Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Quote Originally Posted by shv18 View Post
    Hi All,

    I guess this was INEVITABLE and perhaps now becoming a trend with me of owning and restoring pre-owned bikes!! But honestly i never thought that such an incident would take in my life and that too so quickly!! i would like to thank a lot of members from this forum (and blame them too - directly and indirectly!!) for messing with my head which resulted in going for a bike... which until now was nowhere in the picture and then the end result - bank balance drying up at the speed of light!

    So the list of 'culprits' are as follows (gentlemen please do take this in good humour ) @Divya Sharan, @AK3D, @gopakumar s pillai, @psr sir, @akki4134 and @rreneav1987. Without a doubt i am indebted to all these members mentioned here for letting me finally focus my thoughts and get hold of a machine which i believe i now can begin my real riding adventures with.. I would also like to thank @Sachinnair for sharing detailed longterm ownership experience with his "Midori" (link: https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/superbi...-now-sold.html) which provided a lot of data for us all to get an understanding of the vehicle i now had set my eyes on... thanks a lot buddy it really helped!

    .................................................. ..................



    Pic 13 - 17: My proud possession - Kawasaki Ninja 650.

    Trust me.. it took all my concentration to consciously keep the motorcycle from jumping up the needle to 100 + kmph. By the time i had entered my state border, it was night fall and one thing became apparently clear: the stock OEM headlights SUCK big time!! the visibility on low beam was pathetic and on high beam it was not at all inspiring. So this was definitely something i intended to address at a later stage. But all in all this was definitely something of a different experience for a biker who all this while was conditioned for a single cylinder 250CC motorcycle. I did had experience of riding N250, N300 and a 2009 R1 but all of that was long back when i was stationed in Mumbai but all that seemed to fade away with passage of time and with familiarity of a single cylinder for the last 24,000+ kms.


    Anyways, for the moment let us end this first post here. Shall share more parts of the ownership and restoration story as in when time permits.

    Until Then...


    Cheers,
    First of all congratulations on you taking the 650cc plunge before the inevitable knot .. Jokes apart the willingness and search for your choice with ample background research with knowledge and the actual effort in buying is what sets the serious biker apart from the posers . It was a learning experience for me too , to be associated with the many audacious things you could think of and do....
    Good Luck
    Ride Safe
    When Was The Last Time,You Did Something For The First Time.

  4. #4
    Rusted WindPacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Kochi
    Posts
    274
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Congrats on your new acquisition..the N650 is a very capable all round motorcycle. Happy mile munching

    ATGATT !!!


    Cheers,
    WindPacer
    "Take a deep breath It's Just a BAD DAY, Not a BAD LIFE" - courtesy "The Unknown"

  5. #5
    Rusted krishna77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dum Dum, Kolkata
    Posts
    5,161
    Blog Entries
    3
    Mentioned
    111 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Congratulations!
    Ride hard.

  6. #6
    Addicted Ravikiran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    kalyan
    Posts
    75
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Congratulations !!

  7. #7
    Rusted shv18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The North East-India
    Posts
    1,887
    Mentioned
    163 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Hi All,

    now that the deed was done and i had covered around 120 kms to reach Guwahati, Assam it was time to start planning the initial check up and service to be carried out in order to understand the nature of work that needs to be done on this Kawasaki Ninja 650. I would like to thank rider Zubin Baruah who is a member of N.E.R.D (North East Riders Domain), he helped me in identifying one of the shops which caters to a lot of superbikes and general service in Assam. I had known for a while that in Guwahati, Assam and neighbouring states there were quite a lot of superbikes and other higher cc spec motorcycle owners but most of them are scattered around here and there. I had absolutely no idea that motorcycling had developed to such an extent where people now congregate and go for group rides across different states in this part of the country too and rather seem to be far more active than rest of the India. India is rapidly moving towards the era of motorcycling cultural boom which was quite prominent in both Europe and US in the late 60s - 90s. I am happy to see plenty of riders willing to venture out of their comfort zone and the earlier culture of "kitna deti hain" (how much mileage?) and "itne mein to ek gaadi khareed saktein thhe!" (at the cost of this you could have bought a four wheeler!) is now slowly but steadily vanishing especially in the North Eastern states of India.

    Those who would like to know more about N.E.R.D group, do check out one of their promo video:



    Official Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/nerdofficial/

    Moving on, while on my way back to Guwahati i had made a list of possible work which needed to be carried on my Ninja 650:

    1) Oil & Oil filter change. There was a burning smell emitting from the engine bay and on the highway the vibrations on the handlebar and footpegs started from 2000 - 6000 rpm.
    2) Inspection and Lubrication/change of clutch and throttle cables (If needed). Clutch actuation was 'Royal Enfield' hard!
    3) Inspection & replacement of OEM air filter (if needed).
    4) Physical inspection of the battery and the terminals confirm the present health.
    5) Overhauling of the coolant system and inspection of the radiator in general.
    6) Inspection of the tire wear.
    7) Inspection of Chain and sprockets to determine their health at a garage.
    8) Other nitty gritties...

    Now in order to provide a better reading experience for the readers, i shall break down the respective posts related to overhaul & servicing and subsequent discussions in different parts so that it doesn't end up becoming a tiring read for those who wish to follow this thread. Though i won't guarantee to fully control my blabbering due to my OCMD... may get carried away at times!

    Hope all of you would bear with this mere irrelevant human being. Anyways, let us get on with the story...


    FIRST SERVICE POST OWNERSHIP (PART 1):


    Before the respective service could be carried out on my Ninja 650 and thanks to my OCMD, i first went ahead researching about the availability of spares alternate to that of Kawasaki SVCs. Some riders have reported on K.N.O.G (Kawasaki Ninja Owners Group) that they are usually shooed away from the Kawasaki SVC when it comes to selling spares over the counter while others have had a very good experience dealing with Kawasaki SVCs. By law they are supposed to sell spares but in my experience if the people there don't want to accommodate your request, SVCs also keep few tricks up their sleeve: they usually say that spares are out of stock sir and that they have been asked by Kawasaki Japan not to do so . If you poke and prod then usually they will turn deaf to your request. Anyways, i had already interacted with some of the aftermarket sellers for items required for my Ninja 650 in order to get an idea about the same and availability in general.

    If one wishes to purchase good filters & accessories (and not K&N nonsense!) one can look up on the internet for the following two sellers who deal with spares related to Kawis and other bikes too:

    1) Motousher (web link - Powersports Distributors in India – Bike Parts Sellers – Moto Usher) They import quite a lot of accessories and after market stuff for various high end bikes in India and are also official partner/distributors for items like RAM Mount, Hepco & Becker luggage items etc.

    2) Transformerz (web link - https://www.transformerz.co.in/) The owner Varun Aggarwal is a very passionate rider himself and through multiple interactions over phone and on social media he sounded very helpful and customer centric gentlemen.

    Anyways, based on my earlier experience with the wonder HDEO oil Shell Rimula R4 which has proven itself on my "little bird" Honda CBR 250R (detailed report link: https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general...ml#post1328232) i guess it was inevitable that it was going to be the natural selection to do duty on my Ninja 650. Unless i am wrong i guess this is going to be probably one of the first Ninja 650s in India which will document tests and the aftermath - results on a public forum with pictures for readers to have a look at. It goes without saying that a word of caution is advised for those who may be keen on trying this HDEO oil with their respective motorcycles as this too is going to be purely an experimental run on a Parallel Twin 649cc motor. Since, there was burning smell emitted from the engine bay i wanted to take no chance and immediately provide the engine with high detergent, high ZDDP content oil which could initiate the process of cleaning up the engine internals and also start coating the components with sacrificial zinc layer.



    Pic 1: Shell Rimula R4 HDEO 15W 40 engine oil chosen for the task of cleaning and protecting the N650's engine.

    Now as alternate option to OEM Kawasaki, i could have routed for HiFlo oil filter (Part No. HF303) which is sold in India by both Motousher & Transformerz. I believe this oil filter retails for around Rs. 700/- in India and is readily available compared to OEM Kawasaki which is around Rs. 700-800/- and as per the experiences shared by most of Kawasaki owners, is usually short in supply. Based on my understanding i believe the problem is not with Kawasaki India but the SVCs themselves not willing to keep a stock of spares in their inventory which leads to shortage of required items, unnecessary waiting and thus, irritation for the owners. So for those riders who wish to follow the route of OEM stock direct replacement Oil filters, HiFlo is definitely a good choice and is comparatively easily accessible through the sellers mentioned above and should be deliverable across India (check and confirm with the seller).

    However, being an experimental idiot by nature and inspired by Youtube heroes of mine - 'Tavarish' & Hoovies Garage', i wanted to look out for further options which is way cheaper and easily available right from any small II & III tier cities to B/C towns. I would like to thank @hellgate for sharing his experiences with an alternate option which i later found out is stupidly cheap when compared to OEM Kawasaki oil filter. Name of the oil filter is Purolator and the part no. is PL718900. If one visits any car accessories shop and asks for oil filter from Purolator for Hyundai Santro, i believe this filter should be readily available almost anywhere in India. When i went to the local distributor in Assam to enquire about the availability and pricing for the same, i was offered this filter for a paltry sum of Rs. 80/-. I was in for a little shock as it was just 10% of the retail cost of OEM Kawasaki!! Mind you this oil filter is not an approved one from Kawasaki but thanks to my earlier stint with unapproved Yamaha FZ/Byson oil filter on my Honda CBR 250R i decided to take a chance with another experiment.. Anyways, i picked up two pieces from Purolator's distributor for current and future oil change.

    In order to lubricate the clutch and throttle cables based on my discussion with @psr sir, i zeroed in on sewing machine oil which costed me just Rs.30/-. I decided to confirm the condition of the air filter first and then may be place an order for the same at a later stage.









    pic 2 - 5: HiFlo Oil filter available in India through sellers/distributors Motousher & Transformerz. Experimental oil filter Purolator PL718900 (Hyundai Santro) and sewing machine oil picked up for the upcoming service.

    Now that i was ready with basic spares it was time to visit the garage/mechanic and do the deed. I was directed to a motorcycle shop called Sameer Bajaj by N.E.R.D group member - Zubin Baruah which is situated in Beltola Road, Opposite Sankardev Netralaya, Guwahati. I am also sharing a picture of the shop and reference point for those who have their respective higher spec bikes and may like to get it serviced in North East. It is a small shop located right on the main road which usually sells spares for KTM & Bajaj. At a first glance no-one can say that these guys would be able to handle an N650. But i was assured by Zubin that the mechanics have hands on experience with SBKs right from Triumph, Hayabusa, R1s to Ducatis just that like anywhere one will have to be on the lookout and supervise the whole job.





    Pic 6 & 7: Sameer Bajaj in Guwahati, Assam which caters to carrying out servicing for a lot of SBKs in North East India.

    I interacted with the owner Sameer and then we started with the process of dismantling the fairings to carry out the necessary inspection and servicing of the same. Sameer assigned 3 guys to carry out the task and they were pretty quick with the dis-assembly. At first they took out the rider and pillion seats. Then they went ahead with removing the tank in order to access the air filter box. If one plays close attention to the images shared below, the ECM/ECU (Engine Control Module) sits right on top of the airbox. One will have to unscrew the retainer bolts and gently place the ECM/ECU on the side to take out the top cover of the airbox in order to access the air filter. The air filter is also held by a single screw which one will have to unscrew. Once the necessary component dis-assembly was finished, we then went ahead with the inspection of the throttlebody which was accessible from the top. The twin throttle bodies looked fairly clean so we didn't bother cleaning the same.

    The air filter was also inspected and was found to be usable for another 3 - 5k kms. I decided to let it be and put the OEM air filter back in the air box. We also checked the OEM stock YUASA battery which was found to be good health and there were no deposits or build ups near the terminals. So two items checked out just fine.















    Pic 8 - 14: Dis-assembly of the bike to access the twin throttle bodies and the air filter. ECM/ECU mounted on top of the airbox right below the tank. Note the air filter containing one retainer screw.

    Once the two items checked out and were installed back in, it was time to drain the engine oil and replace the oil filter. The mechanics first dis-assembled the RHS and LHS fairing in order to access the oil filter bay since, Ninja 650 uses a screw type canister based oil filter. When compared to Honda CBR 250R and the likes of other bikes where changing an oil filter is slightly a messy affair, on a Ninja 650 this process is ridiculously easy. If one wishes to save on labour, the whole task is a simple DIY and can be finished in about 15-20 minutes flat. i am sharing a small DIY video showing the process of how one can do the oil and oil filter change without removing the fairing:



    The oil drain bolt is located on the LHS side of the engine and is easily accessible. When the engine oil was drained, it was dark, runny and burning smell was quite prominent. The mechanic then went ahead with removing the old oil filter. It was screwed pretty tight so the mechanic had to wrestle with the oil filter using a ply-wrench and was finally able to remove it. When the OEM Kawasaki oil filter was inspected, it became pretty clear that besides the first 500-1000 kms service, the previous owner has never bothered to replace the engine oil for the last 3+ years! It was indeed a shocker and i was a bit concerned. However, the engine oil level was ok which meant that the engine may have quite a lot of gunk and deposits inside but was never devoid of oil. The oil filter too showed the telltale signs of possible varnish deposits inside the engine. The mechanic then went ahead with the installation of the Purolator PL718900 (Hyundai Santro) oil filter after applying a bit of oil around the rubber gasket. The Purolator oil filter was hand tightened as per the the instructions mentioned on the oil filter itself. We found that there was plenty of space between the Purolator oil filter and the exhaust headers which negates any chances of oil filter coming in contact with the same and may be possible failure due to extreme heat dissipated by the headers. 2 fresh 1ltr bottles of Shell Rimula R4 15W 40 HDEO oil were emptied into the engine. If one checks out the service manual of Kawasaki Ninja 650, it usually recommends filling 1.6 ltrs when only the engine oil is drained, 1.8 ltrs of engine oil with the replacement of oil filter and 2.3 ltrs if the engine is dis-assembled. However, in my case we found that my Ninja 650 happily gobbled up both 1 ltr bottles of Shell Rimula R4 engine oil. I guess with slightly more deck height of the Purolator oil filter, the amount of engine oil required increases by 200 ml when compared to OEM stock or replacement filters from the likes of HiFlo.

    For the sake of learning i am also sharing an oil flow diagram of the Ninja 650 engine in order to allow readers to get a better perspective of how the oil flows across the engine and how the lubrication is sprayed onto different components. Now those who wish to understand the basics on engine oil and its importance, one may refer to the video link below which was actually created by Chevrolet long back in the year 1937. I guess this video will allow readers to soak in how far we have come, how old a 4 stroke motor is right?:





















    Pic 15 - 23: Engine oil drained and oil filter removed from the oil filter bay. Note the varnish deposits on the oil filter. Purolator oil filter installed on Ninja 650.

    Regardless, once everything was checked, we then cranked the engine to life in order to confirm if there were any leaks from the oil filter side or the drain bolt side. It was astonishing to see the engine oil changing colour from amber to complete black in less than a minute which confirmed my suspicion that the internals of this engine was coated in varnish and possibly the oil galleys too had significant deposit formation inside.

    However, after seeing this event happening right in front of my eyes i was in splits and was busy laughing quite loudly if i might add. The mechanics were puzzled looking at my reaction wondering if they have met someone who has managed to loose one bolt from somewhere on top? I called up @psr sir still laughing, sharing the whole ordeal and told him, "i don't know how i don't know why... such bikes are attracted to me or may be i am attracted to them! May be something is wrong with me...". Even though i knew it was going take a little bit of effort to restore this one, i never imagined that besides a hunch - the "Story so far..." was going to repeat itself all over again here as well!! I simply couldn't stop myself and kept on laughing for a while... I guess subconsciously may be i prefer 'damaged goods'.. which need a little bit of love, care and affection and enjoy the whole process of bringing such vehicles back to pristine condition. Maybe the inner biker in me likes to tinker around to keep my OCMD under check!!














    Pic 24 - 29: 2 ltrs of Shell Rimula R4 HDEO oil filled into the engine. Note the requirement of oil level specified by the service manual of Ninja 650. With Purolator oil filter my Ninja 650 was content with 200 ml extra engine oil. Engine oil turning black in less than a minute confirming high amount of particulates and deposits inside the engine.

    Knowing the superior cleansing capabilities of Shell Rimula R4 HDEO oil, we both were convinced that this oil will do what it does best and after a few rounds of Rimula treatment, i should witness a better, cleaner engine with better performance and acceleration. But i guess only time will tell whether this experiment turns out to be a success or a complete dud. @psr sir too found it pretty amusing that instead of panicking here was i laughing it out and taking things lightly about the current condition of my new acquisition. I guess he is tired of constant ramblings and trouble i religiously give him all the time whenever i am in doubt.

    Regardless, after getting confirmation that no leaks were found from the oil filter or the drain bolt side, the mechanics then went ahead with the next section of overhauling process. In order to keep things short it shall be covered in upcoming post.

    until then...


    Cheers,

    Quote Originally Posted by The Monk View Post
    Ownership Thread Approved

    Congratulations Shivang
    Thanks a ton Avinash bhai.. I guess may be by fate or luck, it seems to be the case that you always do the initiation of approving every thread that i post on XBHP

    Quote Originally Posted by psr View Post
    First of all congratulations on you taking the 650cc plunge before the inevitable knot .. Jokes apart the willingness and search for your choice with ample background research with knowledge and the actual effort in buying is what sets the serious biker apart from the posers . It was a learning experience for me too , to be associated with the many audacious things you could think of and do....
    Good Luck
    Ride Safe
    Hehehehe.. sir you know what lies ahead right and the level of OCMD i have!!

    Quote Originally Posted by WindPacer View Post
    Congrats on your new acquisition..the N650 is a very capable all round motorcycle. Happy mile munching

    ATGATT !!!


    Cheers,
    WindPacer
    Thanks buddy.. i hope to explore her capabilities as i slowly start clocking highway miles soon..

    Quote Originally Posted by krishna77 View Post
    Congratulations!
    Ride hard.
    Thank you for the same..
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravikiran View Post
    Congratulations !!
    Thank you Ravi bhai. Hope you are enjoying your CBR to the fullest..
    Last edited by shv18; 03-28-2018 at 03:04 AM. Reason: corrections
    bharatheshk, psr and Midhun.akd like this.
    A quote by a toilet, " use me well, keep me clean, i would never tell anybody whatever i have seen.." :P

  8. #8
    psr
    psr is offline
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    CHENNAI , TAMILNADU
    Posts
    5,805
    Mentioned
    678 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Quote Originally Posted by shv18 View Post
    Hi All,

    now that the deed was done and i had covered around 120 kms to reach Guwahati, Assam it was time to start planning the initial check up and service to be carried out in order to understand the nature of work that needs to be done on this Kawasaki Ninja 650.


    1st SERVICE POST OWNERSHIP (PART 1):
    ..................................................














    Pic 24 - 29: 2 ltrs of Shell Rimula R4 HDEO oil filled into the engine. Note the requirement of oil level specified by the service manual of Ninja 650. With Purolator oil filter my Ninja 650 was content with 200 ml extra engine oil. Engine oil turning black in less than a minute confirming high amount of particulates and deposits inside the engine.

    ..
    A comprehensive write up with pictures...The picture of the Older ,Oil filter with oil looking like old varnish is really scary..The previous owner had not been taking good care of the internals and only kept the outside clean and presentable..The fact the New oil became dark with deposits the instant you started the engine ,with New Engine Oil ,is proof of that.
    In such instances You Do Need an engine oil high on detergent with protective additives..The detergent to clean the muck and the additives to safeguard the moving parts while the cleaning takes place. The Shell Rimula R4 is a Good Choice, and like you said , you seem to attract vehicles needing this kind of care. It is also because of the OCMD, that the cleanliness of not only the outer but also the inner working area of the engine which makes one look out for every detail however small they may be..
    I am sure that Like in your CBR250 experience, you may have to go through at least 3~4 cycles of cleaning with R4 before cleaner engine. The Air filter does look dirty but with MPFi working well you can continue to use it for a while..at least another 4 K Kms.
    The find ,and use, of a less expensive Oil filter of Purolater , along with Shell Rimula R4 makes it possible to do an oil change at a fraction of what the ASC charges, making it one more cost effective alternate for the Ninja 650 maintenance which should benefit owners..Thanks to @ Hellgate and you..
    Good Luck
    Ride safe
    When Was The Last Time,You Did Something For The First Time.

  9. #9
    Rusted shv18's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    The North East-India
    Posts
    1,887
    Mentioned
    163 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Hi All,

    hope this new style of presentation on sequence of events in multiple section works out better for the readers. Anyways, in continuation of the same let us get on with the story.

    1st SERVICE POST OWNERSHIP (PART 2)

    After the respective tasks related to engine oil and oil filter change was completed, the mechanics then went ahead with the inspection and subsequent overhauling of the coolant system. Now for the sake of learning, if one dives into the workshop manual of Kawasaki Ninja 650 one gets to understand the basic functioning of the coolant system and the associated components which work together to allow dissipation of heat and management of the same from the engine. Unlike an air cooled one, in an liquid cooled engine the cooling system plays a significant role in maintaining ideal operating temperature of the engine which in turn also reduces thermal stress on the engine oil thus, increasing its longevity by manyfold. Without a proper functional cooling system one is looking at the possibility of irreversible damage to the engine components which in turn will take the bill of maintenance and ownership of such a vehicle to pretty much to non-feasible category. The state of the engine oil that came out from my Ninja 650 already gave us a pretty good idea of the kind of life led by this vehicle for the last 3+ years. So in a way i was not too confident about the current state of coolant either.






    Pic 1 & 2: Flow chart and exploded view of the coolant system on a Ninja 650.

    Moving on, the mechanics then started to dis-assemble the RHS & LHS side of the fairing in order to assess the condition of the coolant radiator and also to get better access to the deeper recesses of the engine. I was happy to note that the radiator fins were in top notch condition: not a single fin was found to be bent which helped me deduce that this motorcycle was seldomly taken out for a rides and in all probability weekend rides at the most. When i had gone to meet the owner in order to collect the bike, i noticed that the vehicle was kept running for nothing less than 30 mins while the driver was busy meticulously cleaning it. On further discussion the owner told me that it was the daily routine of the bike to be started and kept on idle for a long periods of time while the bike is being washed by his guy. Although this was a good thing in terms of keeping the battery in top notch condition as it gets an opportunity to charge daily, it plays a havoc on the engine oil and the coolant due to short duration of heat cycles the engine goes through without adequate air flow. Regardless, again the workshop manual was checked in order to understand how and what temperature the thermostat becomes operational and how the coolant is circulated at different ranges.









    Pic 3 - 6: RHS & LHS fairing taken out to inspect the radiator. The condition of the radiator fins were found to be in mint condition barring dust and dirt accumulation. Coolant flow chart giving a detailed explanation on coolant flow and thermostat activation at different temperatures besides the radiator fan temperature specific operation details.

    After the inspection of the radiator fins was completed we then moved onto the RHS side of the vehicle where the radiator reservoir tank is located. I believe the colour of the coolant as shown in the image below will confirm what i had already suspected - the coolant was never replaced during the ownership term of the previous owner. There were visible deposits of crud and yellowish (possibly dried up coolant) sediments inside the reservoir. On referring to the workshop manual, it too confirmed that the current state the coolant was in it was a complete goner and perhaps just in the last stages of its functional life. Being a rider suffering from OCMD (Obsessive Compulsive Motorcycling Disorder) i found it very difficult to digest that such vehicles also exist - ignored, unloved yet cleaned and polished from the outside for rest of the world to see. Without a doubt this pathetic mixture of gunk and deposits in the coolant system had to go!







    Pic 7 - 9: Note the condition of the coolant which contained a lot of deposits. The reservoir tank had a layer of yellowish deposits (dried up coolant). Workshop manual confirming the immediate need of changing the coolant and process needed to be followed for the same.

    Based on my earlier experience with my Honda CBR 250R (https://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general...ml#post1149661) and as recommended by the workshop manual, i had to drain and flush the coolant in various stages in order to try and remove the deposits inside the coolant system. The engine was first warmed up to allow the thermostat to open and circulate the coolant inside. After waiting for about 10-15 mins the mechanic then removed the drain bolt to take out the old coolant from the engine. The reservoir tank was separately drained by removing the bottom hose. It was quite dis-heartening to see the amount of deposits stuck inside the coolant reservoir tank. I would say in comparison, my Honda CBR 250R even though neglected, the coolant was in much better shape then what i was witnessing in front of my eyes at the moment.

    Anyways, the mechanic then used 50% white vinegar and 50% distilled water to fill the radiator and the reservoir tank. Vinegar has a mild acetic acid which acts like a detergent, gently removing deposits from the walls of the radiator and the radiator lines. However, looking at the condition the reservoir tank was in it was clear that regardless of how many rounds of coolant system flushing we do, we will have to use one round of sacrificial coolant: one which will be run through various heat cycles which will slowly but surely strip off primary and secondary layer of deposits inside the radiator, coolant lines, the reservoir tank and then shall be drained at an early interval. The same was also suggested by @psr sir as i was busy troubling him as in when the work was being carried out by the mechanics. We went through 3 - 4 rounds of coolant system flushing with the last round being with only pure distilled water in order to remove vinegar residue from the system. As per the workshop manual, Kawasaki recommends using a mix of fresh 50% of distilled water and 50% of coolant for the cooling system. However, i decided to go ahead with Motul Motocool Expert premix coolant which was readily available at the shop.

    In the long run i intend to use Engine Ice high performance coolant (https://www.engineice.com/) which many Ninja 650 owners swear by and have had a good experience with. Also looking at the operating temperature of the radiator fan (above 104'C) i didn't want to cook my legs at stop and go traffic for sure!! Regardless, the fresh bottle of Motocool coolant was poured in and the coolant was cycled through the system while ensuring that no air lock takes place. The coolant level was topped up in the reservoir tank as per the recommended level and then then we inspected the system for any leaks.













    Pic 10 -15: Old coolant getting removed from the cooling system through drain bolt located at the bottom RHS side of the engine. Note the deposits inside the coolant reservoir. Motul Motocool expert coolant was used as as sacrifical one to go through the cleaning cycle of the coolant system which shall be drained at an early interval post a running it for a few thousand kms.

    After the cooling system was taken care of we then moved on with inspection of the clutch system. As mentioned earlier, the clutch actuation was super hard (pretty much comparable to REs!). Looking at the daily washing this motorcycle received in the last 3+ years, i was certain that the clutch cable was a complete goner and in all probability would need to be replaced. However, @psr sir suggested to inspect the clutch cable once and try and lubricate it before going crazy over shopping for spares on streets! The workshop manual was again referred to which confirmed that periodic lubing and adjustment of clutch cable is recommended which will enhance the life of the same. Also none of the owners have ever reported pre-mature death or breakage of clutch cables anywhere in the world related to Ninja 650.

    The mechanic then went ahead in removing the clutch cable from the clutch lever. Honest to god, i was taken aback for a bit when i saw the thickness of the clutch cable strand! For a Honda CBR 250R owner where based on my experience, the clutch cable had to be replaced @ every 12,000 - 15,000 kms due to usage wear and shearing, the wire strands of 250R were puny and insignificant when compared to that of a Kawasaki Ninja 650. This meant that Kawasaki had ensured that one of the heavily actuated component which may have an early wear was specifically and significantly beefed up by a good margin for longevity while the vehicle is in operation in due course of time.








    Pic 16 - 18: Shop manual confirming the need of lubrication of clutch cable at periodic intervals. Note the thickness of the clutch wire strand which is far more than the puny strands found on Honda CBR 250R's clutch cable.

    When the clutch cable from the top was inspected, it was found to be in pretty good shape. But it was totally a different story when the bottom half was dismantled from the engine - there were noticeable rust deposits on the lip of the inner sheath of the clutch cable. Based on my discussion with @psr sir it was clear that due to constant exposure to water thanks to daily washing ritual followed by the previous owner, moisture ingress had taken place which slowly corroded the outer and inner sheath, swelling it in the process thus making it difficult for the clutch cable to pass through when the clutch was actuated - end result being super hard clutch. He suggested to inspect the bottom cable and confirm whether the clutch cable strand was ok or had visible shear marks on it. If there was none, a little but of elbow grease and proper lubrication should solve the problem.

    We found the bottom part of the clutch cable strand to be in good health and devoid of any rust deposit or shear marks so the clutch cable was deemed safe to use. The mechanic then finished almost the whole bottle of the sewing machine oil to lubricate the clutch cable from the top and the bottom section in order to satisfy this OCMD rider. After the lubrication was done the clutch cable was assembled back in its place and the mechanic then adjusted the clutch play as required.









    Pic 19 - 22: Clutch cable being lubricated. Note the rust deposits at the bottom part of the clutch. Both top and bottom being lubricated thoroughly with sewing machine oil.

    After the clutch job was done the mechanic then went ahead with re-installation of the removed fairings, fuel tank and the seats on my Ninja 650. Because I was present while the ongoing job was performed by the guys at the shop, I had a great time learning about the inner workings of a motorcycle with which i was just in the beginning of my relationship (sounds lame but can't help it!! ). I guess as we progress, this motorcycle will teach me a lot more things especially since, this is the first 4 stroke multi-cylinder motorcycle i have owned so far.



    Pic 23: Fairings and associated items getting re-installed onto my Kawasaki Ninja 650.

    After everything was done, the owner of the shop took out my Ninja 650 for a test run. After he was satisfied he asked me to do the same in order to confirm the feel of bike post the service. After a short spin I came back to the shop cleared off the bill and then went ahead with the ride back to my place of stay in Guwahati.

    OBSERVATIONS POST SERVICE:

    * Clutch became soft and easy to actuate. Not as butter smooth as a CBR but still far better than what it was earlier.
    * Engine became silent, had a lot more grunt but the vibrations from 2000 - 6000 rpm was still present.
    * Gears shift became smoother.
    * Acceleration was blisteringly fast so had to be super alert to keep my right wrist under control at all the time.
    * Radiator fan coming online was noticeably far lesser after a long duration of stop and go traffic abuse my Ninja 650 had to go through - city life sigh!!
    * Handling was still heavy especially the front felt really weird when the vehicle was leaned to left hand side. Will have to sort it out later.

    Regardless, my Ninja 650 was more or less ready for the return leg of the journey to my place of stay. This meant i had to leave my Honda CBR 250R in Guwahati which anyway had to get the valve shim job done while i try my luck with this 650cc motorcycle over long distance ride. I guess it would allow me to get an idea of the real power, cruising capabilities and overall feel of the vehicle compared to Honda CBR 250R. I have lot more stories to tell and share but until then...


    Cheers,
    Last edited by shv18; 09-19-2018 at 10:23 AM.
    rreneav1987 and psr like this.
    A quote by a toilet, " use me well, keep me clean, i would never tell anybody whatever i have seen.." :P

  10. #10
    Rusted rreneav1987's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Gzb, Delhi & Chennai
    Posts
    4,404
    Mentioned
    273 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Something Mean Something Green: My Kawasaki Ninja 650

    Nice to read everything that you shared with me! My bike has completed more than 5k kms on Rimula R4 and Purolator Oil Filter!! Bike is running fine with no sign of Oil Pressure warning!! That too on the highways and city runs!!

    My last oil change along with Oil filter cost me nothing more than 600/- yes, you read it right!! I have reached Delhi safe from Bangalore with the same set up!!

    Also, after flushing the Radiator and coolant!! The boiling sensation due to air bubbles in the radiator has completely disappeared!! Oh Boy was I happy!! Time to Change oil as I have done more than 3.5k after the last oil change!!



    After draining the coolant! The reservoir had horrible deposits!



    During the flushing process!! These were the similar bubbles popping (infact worse) with Engine running



    This is how it looked after removing the air bubbles from the radiator system! This was when the engine was running and hot enough for the radiator fan to kick in!!



    Well, the final results! Clean coolant!




    Got the opportunity to get my Hermie inspected by @psr himself in Chennai! Thanks to him and you!!
    Last edited by rreneav1987; 03-11-2018 at 11:36 PM.
    psr, shv18, B7ACKTHORN and 1 others like this.
    Splendor - 2k to 2006
    Karizma - 2k3 to 2009
    P180 - 2k6 to 2k9
    Hunk - Oct 2k7 til now
    ZMR - 2010 to Forever
    RX135(2k) - 2013 to 2018
    Ninja 250R (2010) - 2016 til now
    RayZ - 2015 til now
    Ninja 650 (2014) - 2017 til now


    Delhi to Narkanda
    Delhi to Coimbatore
    Delhi to Nepal

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 2018 Kawasaki Ninja 1000 Emerald Green joins the garage
    By dkaile in forum Superbike And Imports
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 10-23-2018, 12:38 PM
  2. A Green Affair! Starring Kawasaki Ninja 650 Edit: Now Sold!
    By Sachinnair in forum Superbike And Imports
    Replies: 711
    Last Post: 07-06-2018, 03:57 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-13-2014, 10:03 PM
  4. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-28-2014, 01:37 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •