Since '02 xBhp is different things to different people. From a close knit national community of bikers to India's only motorcycling lifestyle magazine and a place to make like minded biker friends. Join the #16YearsOfxBhpCelebrations click here.

WE DESIGN ON

Lenovo ThinkPad
Magazine
Castrol Power 1

Check engine oil level before every ride.

Our Partners

User Tag List

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
Like Tree51Likes

Thread: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

  1. #11
    Rusted
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Thane/Pune
    Posts
    1,457
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    Back to Leh

    Next morning, we woke up to find ourselves surrounded by Santa Clauses! It seemed that it had snowed last night on the high passes, and all the surrounding mountains were sporting snow caps on their heads. It was a cute sight, but at the same time it was worrying that we were going to cross those snowy passes today.






    We met our neighbours at the breakfast. It seemed that they too were kept awake by the blowing wind at night, and were worried how we would travel back in such weather. One of them even wondered what would happen if the tent would fly off because of the wind! I certainly didn’t have such worries accompanying me through the night, but it was heartening to see the care from strangers about our safe travel. They offered to carry our luggage in their Innova till Leh, and we happily accepted their offer. With our luggage gone ahead, the motorcycle would be more manageable and us more flexible in event of a fall. After breakfast, we put our luggage in their vehicle, and moved ahead towards the lake.






    The road towards the lake is a steep road that goes on in a straight acute angle from the main road towards the lake, filled with rocks of various size. It was pretty bad in condition, and I would suspect that tourist buses coming down from this road would have a number of grumbled tourists hanging on to dear lives, but it was easy compared to the horrors of Chang La. I passed a number of wet spots that went across the road. These would be the water crossings which flowed after the noon when ice would melt on mountains, but since this was morning, all they had to show were wet spots of sand which posed no problem at all.



    The lake is a majestic sight to behold. Irrespective of the hardships you have felt to reach it, once you reach it and stand beside the vast waters that have made their home at such heights, you feel humble. The water was stirring contently, reaching towards mountains at the other end, and out of sight towards the right. The story of occupation of this lake is a sad one, as heard from a Jawan himself. Till 1960s, there was an unwritten code of trust between India and China, and there were hardly any Indian soldiers posted on this side of India, and the vast lake was ours entirely. When China encroached in 1965, resulting in the first battle of a young India, giving it scars to last for life; it was an easy walk in the park for them to occupy these lands. This long lake of 135 kms, once all ours, is now a partially China occupied territory, with only around 50 kms in our side. However small be the lake that belongs to us, it has not lost its grandiose. It sits serenely stirring, and one wonders how many secrets it has known in its long history.



    The lake is famous in photographers for its ever changing colours. Since it is so high in the mountains, the sky colours are already enhanced, and the lake reflecting the dark blue sky uplifts the scene to another level. But unfortunately, the sky was turning gray, and the colours of the lake were scattered here and there, whenever there would be any opening for the sun to peek in. That didn’t stop us photographing and even in such unfavorable conditions, we managed to get good photographs. Wondering how it would be to come here in a day of clear blue skies, I turned my motorcycle towards the road, Nandinee snapping away to glory.



    Similar to the path that headed us down to the lake, the path up to the main road was equally sloped. In fact I managed to get stuck at a particularly sharp angle, where the motorcycle was not making enough torque to push me forwards. After some fancy trickery with the clutch and some luck, I managed to climb up to the main road. Breathing a sigh of relief for making that climb, we bid adieu to Spangmik and gunned the motorcycle towards Leh.



    The Santaclauses around us - the snow-capped mountains - were slowly chilling the atmosphere. Vesta was making good pace, and I tried not to think too much about the conditions at Chang La that awaited me a few kilometers ahead. We were returning from the same road as yesterday, so we knew what to expect from next obstacle. When we came at the spot of sands and the water crossing, we spotted a scorpio with a group, which happily gave life to Nandinee while I prayed and managed to cross the patch without falling.



    As we were approaching Chang la, and making the turns upwards towards it, I could see a little white snow sprinkled here and there. The atmosphere got chilly very fast, and soon we were struggling to climb upwards. The speed was slow, and the bumpy roads with rocks and potholes placed at the most strategic location didn’t help towards the speed either. Luckily the luggage was travelling safe in Innova, and I had less weight on the bike to manage. When I was around the spot where I had picked up Nandinee yesterday, I saw an Innova coming from behind. I hailed it to stop, and went to ask for lift, but I saw that it was already quite full, with an Indian family and a foreigner family. I was in two minds, whether to ask for lift or not. At one hand, there was safety of my pillion, and on other hand, courtesy towards others. However they had seen us from a distance for quite some time, and they readily offered to give lift to Nandinee. I would have declined in other conditions, however in this weather and in such low tourist season when vehicles were few and far in between, I had no choice but to agree.

    The Innova went ahead, and I mounted Vesta, muttering to her, ‘Well, it’s you and me alone, dear. Take me home safe.’

    The Innova disappeared soon out of sight, and I was making pace alone, tackling turns after turns, telling my back to ignore the last bump, and to brace for next one. The weather was cold, and the wind chill factor was freezing me to the bones. The snow was soon all encompassing; it was hard to believe that I was actually riding in snow! I was prepared for heat, for rains, for cold winds, but not for snow. All my layers of clothing felt as if made by paper, and the wind was polishing my body as if a stone artist would polish a stone.

    I started noticing peculiar things about myself. Whenever I would approach any hard turn, my breath would get hot. Instantly it would fog up the visor of the helmet, making it impossible to look ahead. On hard turns, I had no choice but to slow down and lift up the visor, welcoming the sharp cold winds to work on my face with their claws. It was a game of cat and mouse, and the rocky terrain and the weather were teamed up against me. After a number of such tiring turns where my face would turn stone cold due to hitting cold wind, on a straight patch, I felt as if my body is slowly shutting down. I was still controlling my arms and legs, twisting accelerator and changing gears, but they felt so cold as if they belonged to someone else. There was no stopping for this chill, which was slowly encompassing me. Inch by inch, I could feel the cold spreading away in my body, from my fingers through the perforated leather gloves, to my arms, to my shoulders, to my chest. I was riding ahead, feeling the cold spreading in my body, wondering whether to make a stop. But there was no one behind, and there was no one in front. A woefully unprepared stupid biker was making his way on the mighty Chang La, with no backup.

    There I met myself. When I felt the chill deep inside my body, spread everywhere but a little part near my heart. As if something inside was still glowing bright, making light and spreading warmth. Even in that condition of shivering hands and utterly slow upclimb, I was surprised to come across this little bit of fire. I could feel as if I am all freezed up except for this little part that refused to give in, and fighting against the insurmountable calamity. It was a striking moment, the moment I realized that there exists something inside a man, that refuses to surrender.

    I slowly felt the warmth of that little place spreading back up in my body. I could see increasing amount of snow, and yet couldn’t feel it. My fingers were still burning up, my lips were still being cut from the extremely chilly winds, but I was no longer bothered by them. The cold and the snow and the winds were part of me now, not against me. With renewed vigor, I pushed ahead towards the final upturns of Chang La.

    Even though it was the same road as yesterday, a night of snowing had increased the difficulty levels a few notches high. The road which was already difficult due to upclimb and rocks was now helped further with slush and snow. Vesta’s speed was very low, and I knew that waiting on top of the pass, Nandinee would be having her heart in her mouth till she sees me at least in distance. But the pass is such that you can hardly see the next road save for a few hundred meters, and I had to rush ahead to reach on top as soon as possible.

    I approached the water crossing of 100 meters. It was risky yesterday, and today I expected to be even more so, with the melting snow and the cold helping to chill the water nicely. Braving the temperatures and bracing myself, I entered Vesta into the path and we dipped ourselves in the knee-high water. The water was fresh from freezer, which entered my shoes in an instant and made sure my toes were icy cold. But that was the least of my worries.

    One splash of the cold water and Vesta’s engine simply died. I put both my feet down in the icy cold waters, balancing myself on the motorcycle with shut off engine, overwhelmed by the turn of events. How the hell am I going to push this 150kg beast out of the icy cold water, which spread at least 90 meters ahead of me?! I looked back and ahead in blind hope to see someone, though I could not imagine anyone in their right mind would get down in the cold water helping me push the bike. But there was no soul to be seen.

    I thumbed the starter of the bike, it whirred to glory, but Vesta refused to start. And I understood that after being splashed by such cold water, the engine would not start so easily. Muttering encouraging words under my breath, partly for Vesta and partly for me, I started kicking the motorcycle, if not to start the motorcycle, then to at least to move my foot and to keep it out of water. In a few kicks, Vesta roared and I heaved a sigh. No longer caring of getting wet, all I focused on was to move ahead slowly as to not tumble in the water, and not to splash the water too much to kill the engine. When I almost reached to the end, with only a 10s of meters to go, an expected ditch hidden in the water crossing dipped the front end of Vesta dangerously in, killing its engine again. But this time I was ready. Again a few kicks and good throttle, Vesta gilded across and we were out of the water, on the snowy lands.

    I parked her on the side, and hurriedly removed my shoes and socks. This was the second time in 2 days that I had to repeat this maneuver. Remove the shoes dripping with cold water hurriedly with your cold shivering hands, pry away the wet socks chilling your feet and toes, and dance around to provide some heat in the frozen veins of the leg. While performing this routine, I saw a tourist vehicle coming from behind. I hailed it down, and asked them to deliver a message to a lady-biker who would be on either at the end or at the top of the pass donning full motorcycles gear and keeping a weather eye on road, that her companion would arrive soon, and he was safe. Looking bewildered, the tourists nodded and moved ahead.

    There were only a few steep upclimbs remaining now, and each of them tested my patience and skill. At one particularly nasty turn with sharp angle – both upwards and sidewards - I saw at the speedometer of Vesta, and saw 6kmph! I was moving at the speed of an average human, who walks 1 kilometer in 10 minutes. The only difference is, a few notches reduction in this speed would mean the bike would stall and having no stable ground to keep my feet on, I would invariably fall and be dragged below due to the steep slope.

    Sinking my teeth in the already battered cold-swollen lips, I braced myself, fought turns against turns, and finally could see the top of the pass, and my pillion standing on side, looking extremely tensed and yet very relieved.



    I greeted her, parked Vesta safe on the top, and sat down on my knees. I could hear rattling from the motorcycle’s underbody after the water crossing, but I had no inclination to stop on the way up where there was no help available, and gathering momentum would be very difficult. Now that I was safe on the Chang La top, I had to see whether it was any serious issue. Luckily it was just a loose chain cover that was banging around due to some missed screws, which I was sure were resting in the cold water in the water crossing below. Usually I would remove the cover to save it from falling off, but we were yet to cross the half Chang La pass ahead, and I didn’t want to drench the chain in the slush, so kept it hanging by a thread, as it was.



    We headed to the military canteen and grabbed a cup of hot tea, which felt extremely soothing - even to hold the hot cup in hands. We chatted and updated each other on the events on the journey. Nandinee was astonished to hear that I was almost stranded in the middle of the cold water. I was amused to hear that she left the vehicle and waited in the cold winds, praying and preparing to come down if I was not there in next 15 minutes.



    We came out of the canteen, and started looking around for some vehicle that would give lift to Nandinee till the end of the pass, which was about 13-15 kilometers from here. We saw a bullet coming from Pangong Tso side. It was the same couple that we helped yesterday, and met a few times today as well. The pillion lady on the bike joined Nandinee and both got lift in a vehicle, and the man approached me towards the canteen.




    When people face the same calamities, they tend to stick together, and so we introduced ourselves to each other. It turned out that the biker as Army man Varun, who was touring with his wife. I joined him for a quick snack, and learned that he was posted in Srinagar, and had come to Leh in hopes of catching the festival. The decision of Jammu Government to push the festival ahead had affected yet another tourist.

    We moved on to the bouncy ride below. The snow, it seemed, was limited to mostly the other part of the pass. We could still feel the cold, but the snow density around us was remarkably less. While getting down, we passed a few lady bikers who were moving towards Pangong Tso. A few pillions were walking, as perhaps the rider had felt the turns to be too steep to tackle two up. I doubted whether they knew what awaited them a few kilometers ahead. However I didn’t want to discourage them, so I waved and signed thumbs up towards them. This seemed the universal code in Leh. I have ridden quite a lot, but only in the Himalayas I have seen bikers actually waving and giving thumbs up and generally caring towards other bikers. I think common sufferers make good friends!

    Soon the pass ended and good roads started. I was wondering where would our respective wives be, and passed a military post on our right. I heard a sharp whistle from behind, and looked in the rear view mirror to see the pillions waving frantically towards us. We took a U turn and joined them, dodging generally uncomfortable questions like ‘Didn’t you see us?! Didn’t you hear us?’

    I didn’t know the position of my new friend, but looking at the soldiers at the post saluting him, I sensed that he would be at some good position in the army. He was very friendly, however, and so was his wife. After a round of introductions we chatted while sipping hot tea. We had plans of visiting other interesting places while coming back to Leh, and the couple decided to join us for the same. It would be a new experience for me, to ride with someone new to me, but we welcomed it nonetheless, and enjoyed the day thoroughly.

    Yesterday we had rushed forward towards the Chang La in order to make sure that we reach our destination for the day as soon as possible, as the evenings would empower the water crossings and would make our travel difficult with every passing hour. However today there was no such worry. We had already crossed the toughest part for today, and now we were riding on well laid roads full of cheeky road-signs to keep company, such as ‘I love you darling, but not so fast!’

    The ride on the way back was on full throttle, partly because of the great roads, and partly because of the feeling of breaking free of the tension of riding up Chang La and crossing all the hurdles safely. We would have reached much earlier, but every now and then some beautiful sight across the roads would hails us down and wouldn’t let us leave before taking a photo. At times like these, the pillion photographer really comes handy, as it becomes a team work. Rider points to the sight he wants to click, pillion clicks, reviews the pictures, and if need be, asks rider to stop the bike. Otherwise we continue without breaking pace.




    We saw this beautiful monastery at our left hand side, where the snake like river was providing a beautiful base for the hill on which the monastery was perched proudly on top, and the Sun was shining right on top, making the scene appear as if it would be out of some 3d visualization. The lands of Ladakh continued to offer such majestic sights thrown around carelessly, only for the eyes of a curious traveller.




    When we reached Karu, we had to take the Manali road for a while in order to get to the officer’s mess. Tomorrow I would ride on the same roads for making the exit journey from this beautiful journey. We had the lunch at the Officer’s mess at Karu, after a thoroughly confusing criss cross ride in the army settlement, misguided enthusiastically by many persons. By the time we actually reached the mess, the crows in my stomach were preparing to take off.

    An army marches on its stomach, and so does a traveler. With full tummies, we moved on to our first sight on way to Leh – Thiksey Gompa. This Gompa has featured in the documentary ‘Samsara’, and I was curious to visit it in person. The weather God too, finally decided to smile upon us, and we were blessed with clear blue skies and bright sunlight. The worries of snow were left past in Chang La, and we felt as if Leh was welcoming us back with open arms and a huge smile.




    The roads after Karu passed through numerous villages, and with a little heavier traffic than our route so far. This was expected, as this was the Leh – Manali highway we were riding on. A two lane road connects the villages in twisting motion, and the whole route towards Leh becomes a relaxing ride that lifts one’s spirit up high in the sky.



    Thiksey Gompa is one of the better kept Gompas in this region, and one of the largest as well. We saw the Gompa on top of a hill at right hand side of the road. A mildly steep upclimp took us to the gates of the Gompa.



    There were hardly any tourists here. We asked around, and came to know that the Gompa was closed that day. Oh, what a disappointment! We clicked pictures here and there, but all of us were upset that we were not able to visit the main Gompa. While we got ready to leave for next sight, we saw some TV crew walking right past us onto the stairs that lead to the Gompa. How come they were allowed while we were not?! We marched inside with them as if being a part of that crew, and then started exploring the Gompa. Later we realized that there was some important function going on inside the Gompa, and so some rooms were closed for outsiders that day. Lucky we ventured in, and not believed the first person that said it was closed, otherwise we would have missed this beautiful place.

    We roamed inside the Gompa, walking on the stairs to go further up, much to the chagrin of Nandinee who prefers to walk horizontally than climb up vertically. The Gompa was very well maintained, and it was a pleasure to take a stroll and to click.









    As with all the Gompas, this too was situated on a hill, with breathtaking views all around.



    The interiors are very well maintained. There was some function going on and hence all the atmosphere inside was quite silent, but that suited ups perfectly. After exploring the Thiksey Gompa, we got down to make our way to the next stop – Shey Gompa. But not without clicking one last photo of the Thiksey Gompa.



    Continuing on the same road towards Leh, soon we took a left at a board pointing ‘Shey Gompa’. A steep rocky road leads to the gompa. At other times, this road might have seemed daunting, but after the Chang La adventure, this was an easy climb.



    The Gompa is sadly in tattered conditions, and contains some of the most staggering climbs. An old watchman who stoutly refused to be photographed cared for the temple that housed a huge idol Buddha. This idol is located in a temple on the top floor of the Gompa, visible only from the chest up. The rest of the body is said to be below the visible part going as low as 40 feet!



    The condition of this Gompa is a little better than Leh palace, but it is nowhere as maintained as Thiksey. However, as with all old places with history, this places oozes with charm that encompasses the visitors.

    We climbed down the Gompa, and it was time to bid adieu to our riding partners. It had been many years since I rode with friends, and this small encounter with strangers rekindled the happy memories. The army couple moved on to their destination that night, and we prepared to move to ours.

    At the opposite side of this Gompa, we saw a sign ‘Holy-Fish-Pond’. I couldn’t get the meaning of this sigh, as there were various permutation-combinations of the meaning: Ordinary pond containing holy fish - Holy pond containing ordinary fish – Holy fish in holy pond and so on. But the little pond was very picturesque.



    We gathered speed and started moving fast to Leh, as the sun was packing its things to take leave for the day. While riding, I heard a loud clanking noise as if something metallic has fallen off the bike. I realized the poor chain cover of Vesta had finally given up, throwing away the one screw that feebly held it in place for so long. Soon I was being overtaken by other vehicles who gestured or shouted at me ‘KUCHH GIR GAYA!!’ (something fell off!)

    I turned back to pick it up. Luckily no vehicle had run over it, otherwise it would be resting in a trash can at Leh. I remembered seeing the garages yesterday, which were not too far from we were. We got in one such garage on the way back, and got the cover fixed. While the work was ongoing, I overheard two bikers speaking in Marathi. I struck a conversation, curious about their story. They had rented bikes in Manali and were coming from there. Their experience of Rohtang La – the first pass on the Manali – Leh highway – was very bad, with slush and rain thoroughly painting them. Also, I learned from them that the general condition of motorcycles rented from Manali is much more in doubt than ones rented in Leh itself.

    They too had stayed at Pangong Tso yesterday like us. When asked about their experience about that stay, one of them was very enthusiastic in his response.

    ‘There were free drinks! There was some party in that hotel and we were invited to that party, and there were free drinks! The weather turned gray and we couldn’t get much good photos of the lake, and the snow freezed us to the bikes, but did I tell you about the free drinks?!’

    Smiling as to how the definition of happiness changes from person to person, we took their leave and headed back to Leh. We filled up petrol from the petrol pump just outside Leh, and went to collect our luggage from the senior tourists that carried it with them. They welcomed us like we were family, and we were chatting up till it was 8 pm. As we had to go back to hotel, pack all the things finally and move out of Leh tomorrow, we had to stop the chat, but not without exchanging the email ids and phone numbers.

    We returned to hotel at 8.30, and faced the lady owner who was looking quite worried. ‘Bohot late ho gaya!’ she asked caringly. It sure felt nice to see such care extended by new persons. But I guess this is what Himalaya does to you. It brings people closes, and it melts the distance between minds. Where strangers offer helping hands and businessmen actually care about customers. The magic of Himalayas continue affecting every soul fortunate enough to spend a moment in the shadows of the great mountains.

    It was a very long day, and we wearily carried ourselves to bed post dinner, and drifted to sleep. Tomorrow we would leave this hotel and Leh, and would head back home through Tso Moriri route. It was supposed to be an comparitively easy ride now on, or at least so we thought. Another adventure was awaiting us tomorrow, with twisted smile on its face. But that calls for another story, another time.

  2. #12
    Rusted princesirohi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Pune -- Mumbai
    Posts
    8,251
    Blog Entries
    3
    Mentioned
    137 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    superb.. nice tour and great pics..

  3. #13
    Rusted ArnabC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Calcutta > Bangalore > Pune > Bangalore
    Posts
    472
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    One of the most detailed T-log on Ladakh trip I've come across. T-logs like help people, like us, who're planning to go to Ladakh and will be able to prepare themselves for the possible obstacles to be faced and how to face them. Hooked on to the thread. Keep it coming.

    BTW superb pics !!!
    Yamaha YZF R15 V 2.0 (Oct, 2012 - Present)
    Yamaha YZF R3 (Sep, 2015 - Present)

    My Review of Yamaha R3 at 82K ODO

    Ride a motorcycle if you want to live free, but above all ride it safe and make others' lives safe.

  4. #14
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    India
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    I really enjoyed your journey.... Wonderful to have partner to share the crazy moments of life together. Hats off to both of you.

  5. #15
    Rusted
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Thane/Pune
    Posts
    1,457
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    A good news regarding the travelogue. I had submitted this to Wrangler True Wanderer contest, and it is selected to be one amongst top 10! I will be going on another tour from 24th to 30th April 2014, and would be posting a separate thread documenting the same. If you like reading that, please vote!

  6. #16
    Addicted
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    120
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    One of the most amazing Tlogs till date..... Simply mind blowing... Keep it coming...

  7. #17
    Addicted rajpal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Neverland
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    19 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    Beautiful Pics...

    keep'em coming.
    Once I have donned my black helmet, I become anonymous. My face ceases to identify me. My black visor shields others from the rigours of my passing glance while shielding me from their attempts to peer into my soul. I am an anonymous rider shrouded in black. I am no longer a specific self. I am a passing Traveller.

  8. #18
    Rusted krishna77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Dum Dum, Kolkata
    Posts
    5,349
    Blog Entries
    3
    Mentioned
    111 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    Very detailed and informative log. Beautiful pictures as well.

  9. #19
    Rusted itsmevini123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Delhi
    Posts
    2,208
    Mentioned
    24 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Icon14 Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    Ok, This T-log is gonna help me next year apart from that super amazing pictures and nicely written too...
    KTM RC390 - Current
    Yamaha R15 v2 - Sold
    Hero Hunk - Sold
    An IT Engineer by profession and a rider by soul.


    Delhi to Sach Pass - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/3...h-ka-darr.html
    Delhi to Mana - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/2...xperience.html
    Delhi to Munsyari - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/2...ttrakhand.html
    Spiti circuit - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/tourer/3...cuit-solo.html

    Facebook

  10. #20
    Rookie
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Thane
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Vesta tours and travels: Dreams of Leh

    This is inspirational and sensational. Well Done- esp to your wife! a- for supporting your husband and sharing his happiness!

    Immideatly shared it with my wife

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 06-20-2011, 12:53 PM
  2. [Photo Feature]: My Travels across Assam
    By bsenroy in forum The Tourer
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-17-2011, 06:45 PM
  3. Replies: 77
    Last Post: 06-16-2011, 07:20 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 05-13-2011, 03:48 PM
  5. Replies: 46
    Last Post: 04-24-2010, 03:47 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •