Since '02 xBhp is different things to different people. From a close knit national community of bikers to India's only motorcycling lifestyle magazine and a place to make like minded biker friends. Join the #16YearsOfxBhpCelebrations click here.

WE DESIGN ON

Lenovo ThinkPad
Magazine
Castrol Power 1

Practice slow-speed riding.

Our Partners

User Tag List

Page 1 of 134 123451151101 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 1339
Like Tree168Likes

Thread: World of Sprockets!

  1. #1
    Moderator Samarth 619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rajasthan
    Posts
    4,801
    Blog Entries
    4
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smile World of Sprockets!

    Gearing is a measure of all the components that determine the rate at which an engine's crankshaft's revolutions are transmitted, into the vehicle's speed. It comes from the word "gears" which are rotating cogs, which decide what speed the machine picks up, at a particular rpm.
    Secondary gearing is related to front and rear sprockets of a motorcycle. Primary gearing is related to the internal gears, related to the gearbox.



    A Sample photo of the rear & front sprockets, of 2 different Pulsars (180 & 220), is given below:





    So, you can see above how the engine carries the power to rear wheel, via both the sprockets and chain.

    Rear sprocket is often visible to all, its the front sprocket that's often hidden, which we can see in the above image.


    Sprocketing, in general sense, means changing the front & rear sprocket sizes to affect gearing. It's one of the simplest and easiest mods. The basic info says that:-->

    1. Bigger rear sprocket or smaller front sprocket, results in gearing biased towards acceleration, with some lag in top speed.
    2. Smaller rear sprocket or bigger front sprocket, results in gearing biased towards top speed, with some lag in acceleration.

    Gearing does NOT result in more or less power. It only affects how the power is laid, by changing the balance between top speed and acceleration. So, if one wants more top speed, and is prepared to lose acceleration a bit, or vice versa, then sprocketing is advisable.

    Taller gearing results in better highway mileage, and short gearing results in less highway mileage. This is due to the fact, that in longer gearing, the machine travels longer distance for a particular engine speed (rpm), and vice versa.

    Gearing maybe affected by: Sprockets' size change, rear tyre's size change, gearbox modification, clutch drag, etc.
    Gearing is NOT affected by: Weight/ load change (pillion, etc.), front tyre change, free flow air filters/ power mods, etc.

    -----------
    Change Measurement: Final Gearing Value: The sizes of front and rear sprocket (measured in "no. of teeth" the sprockets have) determines the final gearing.
    It is calculated by Rear Sprocket Teeth divided by Front sprocket Teeth. Like Pulsar 180 UG4 has a 14 front and 39 rear setup. So, its stock final gearing is 39/14 which is equal to 2.786.

    Final gearing is for comparison between different sprocket combinations, this way:

    45/15= 3.000 (Let's call this "Setup X")
    44/14= 3.143 (Under gearing, compared to "Setup X", means more acceleration)
    39/14= 2.786 (Over gearing, compared to "Setup X", means more top speed)

    Higher Final Gearing value signifies moving gearing towards acceleration (short gearing), and vice versa. So, when changing both sprockets from stock, the new gearing value should be calculated to determine which way you're going with gearing.

    But if you overgear too much, you might need a very long stretch to achieve a good top speed, or you might not achieve it at all. So, for a stock bike, a gearing change should be within 10% at maximum, that's it!

    --
    Rear Tyres size change affect Gearing: Rear Tyre change (size) may affect overall gearing, if the profile (height) is affected due to this change. A higher profile increases gearing, while a lower profile decreases it.
    A tyre with size 120/70 has a normal height of (120mm x 70%) which is 84mm. But, the broadness of the tyre rim can change the "final height".

    A broader rim gives less tyre height, as tyre is rubber, and it expands over the broader rim, causing lesser ride height & lower gearing. And of course, vice versa too. For example, if you fit the R15 rear tyre on your Pulsars, you might not change gearing at all, because although the R15 tyre is of lower height, but the Pulsar rim is narrower than R15's, and a narrow rim raises the ride height.

    Front tyre size change doesn't affect gearing, although it may contribute to a different ride height, weight and different speeds on the speedometer.


    ============
    Direct Sprocket Fits:

    Remember that your stock chain can be successfully adjusted for upto 2-3 teeth changes in sprockets. Beyond that, you may or may not require a new chain OR you may be required to remove some links from the chain. For the sake of pillion travel, the chain play should be adequate. After re-installing the chain, move the bottom portion of chain upwards, it should go upto 10-15mm only, not more or less than this.
    Remember that you might need to purchase the whole kit instead of just the sprocket depending on where you purchase it from. These sprocket combinations are direct fits to the mentioned bikes:

    Apache RTR 160/ 160 Fi: Stock Setup: 13/44 teeth.

    To overgear RTR 160, use the 14 teeth front sprocket from Yamaha YZF R15/ Fiero F2. (Thanks Aparajith)
    To overgear RTR 160, use the 14 teeth front sprocket from Apache RTR 180. (Thanks Khanz)

    Apache RTR 180: Stock Setup: 14/46 teeth.

    To overgear RTR 180, use the 15 teeth front sprocket from Bajaj Pulsar 150/ 180 UG3 only! But, buy a sprocket holder ring and the nuts to suit, as the RTR ones do not match the Pulsars' sprocket. (Thanks FlyingJian & lijok)

    To undergear RTR 180, use the 13 teeth front sprocket from RTR 160, its a direct fit. (Thanks Utkarsh Stunty Sharma)

    Pulsar 220 DTS Fi (Old model): Stock setup: 14/37 on .520 pitch.

    To undergear it, use:
    P200's rear sprocket, 38 teeth,
    Karizma's rear sprocket, 40 teeth, (Thanks Praful) HOWEVER NOTE THAT, its not advisable to use Karizma sprocket, because its a very tight fit and the smaller sprocket holes, the threads on the studs get compromised, so you might have to use a new studs set (12x4) everytime you upgrade your sprocket.. plus wear and tear while riding. (Thanks ashwinprakas)
    Another choice is to use P180 UG4's rear sprocket (39 teeth). (not confirmed yet, but it should fit I believe)
    KTM Duke 200's rear sprocket, the one with 4 fitment holes and 43 teeth (not 6 holes), (Thanks joelkraju)

    Pulsar 200 DTSi: Stock setup: 14/38 on .520 pitch.

    To overgear it, use P220's rear sprocket, 36-37 teeth,
    To undergear it, use Karizma's rear sprocket, 40 teeth, (Thanks Praful)

    Pulsar 180 UG4: Stock Setup (14/ 39 on the .520 chain pitch setup. 104 links.)

    To undergear it well, use a 43 teeth sprocket from a Duke 200.
    The entire Duke 200 chain kit will fit, but the Duke's chain is too long, and you might need to use Pulsar 180 UG4's original chain or cut 6 links of Duke's chain. Cutting Duke 200's (or any other O-Ring) chain's links is not recommended. (Thanks chinmay_7d)

    To overgear it, use P220's rear sprocket, 36-37 teeth,
    To undergear it, use Karizma's rear sprocket, 40 teeth, (Thanks Praful)

    Pulsar 180 and 150 UG3: Stock Setup: (15/43 and 15/44 on .428 chain pitch. 124 chain links.)

    To undergear it, use Discover 135 Sports' Front Sprocket, 14 teeth. But you will need Discover's lock plate and nuts. (Thanks Prabhakar 150)

    To overgear it, use the complete chain-sprocket kit of Pulsar 180 UG4 or Pulsar 200 (first ver.), which is 14/39 and 14/38 respectively.
    You can remove the metal chain guard and instead, use plastic chain guard from Discover 135 Sports (Rs. 74) after drilling a hole in it, as its maintenance free O Ring chain. Don't put oil, just put chain spray on it. Remove 2 chain links from the chain, if you can. Otherwise, it will require link cutting later on as the chain wears out. (tried by Samarth 619 on P180 UG3)

    For ONLY slight gearing change, you can use P150 UG3's kit in P180 UG3 (for undergearing) and P180 UG3's kit in P150 UG3 (for overgearing).

    Pulsar 150 UG2 (Analog Meter): Stock setup: ~/44

    To overgear, use a 40 teeth rear sprocket (with 6 fitment holes) from LML Freedom. It requires cutting 2 links from the chain. (thanks hotshot.vipin)
    (The rear sprockets of FZ, R15, Pulsar UG2 and earlier, LML Freedom, have 6 fitment holes. Others mostly have 4.)

    Bajaj V15: Stock Setup: 14/42

    For overgearing, You can fit Pulsar 220's chain and sprocket kit. Although, since the front sprocket's lock is not available separately, you'll have to use ring lock. (Thanks @AvmPro )

    Yamaha SZ-R: Stock Setup: 14/42

    To overgear it, use rear sprocket, 41 teeth from Yamaha FZ v 2.0 OR 40 teeth from Yamaha FZ16 i.e. version 1. (Thanks auggyds)

    Yamaha YZF R15 Version 1.0: Stock Setup: 14/42

    To overgear it, use rear sprocket, 40 teeth from Yamaha FZ 16. (Thanks anirudh_fz1)

    Daytona Kits for R15 (may be expensive):

    To undergear it, get the Daytona Kit's 13 teeth front,
    To undergear it, get the Daytona Kit's 44 teeth rear,
    To overgear it, get the Daytona Kit's 40 teeth rear.

    To undergear it, use the 13 teeth front sprocket from Apache RTR 160 (get it with locking ring and those 2 bolts) costs around 70 for sprocket and 12 for ring.
    To overgear it, use the 15 teeth front one from R15 v2. But beware, you need to loosen the chain to accommodate this one, if yours is dialled at first setting then chances are this one isn't for you. costs about 120 for ring and sprocket.(Thanks to Tanmay26)

    Yamaha FZ16: Stock Setup: 14/40

    To overgear it, use front sprocket, 15 teeth from Honda Unicorn or Bajaj Pulsar 150/180 UG3. (Thanks iamvik and)
    To undergear it, use rear sprocket, 42 teeth from Yamaha YZF R15. (Thanks anirudh_fz1)

    Daytona Kits for FZ16 (may be expensive):

    To undergear it, get the Daytona Kit's 13 teeth front or 42 or 44 teeth rear.

    (For both R15 version 1.0 and FZ16, Daytona kits provide a choice of 40/42/44 teeth sprockets for rear, 13 teeth for front, and either a 122 or a 130 link chain, so you can choose your new gearing accordingly)

    Honda Shine 125: Stock Setup: 14/~

    To overgear it, use front sprocket, 15 teeth from Honda Unicorn. But, you'll have to shave off the sides of the sprocket so it matches the chain pitch. (Bike India)

    Honda Stunner 125 Carb: Stock Setup: 14/~

    To overgear it, use front sprocket, 15 teeth from Honda Unicorn. (Thanks cmahajan)

    Honda Unicorn 1st and 2nd Gen: Stock Setup: 15/42
    Honda Unicorn 3rd/4th onwards: Stock Setup: 15/43

    Direct Fits - With Chain pitch .428 (Unicorn Chain)
    with Rear 38T (Ambition)
    with Rear 46T (CBZ Classic)

    With Chain Pitch .520 (Karizma chain):
    13T/40T of Karizma
    13T(ZMA)/38T(P200)

    Hero Honda Karizma: Stock Setup: 13/40 on .520 Pitch.

    To overgear, use a 38 teeth Rear Sprocket from P200, but P200 chain length is not sufficient. Adjust your Karizma Chain after installing. (Thanks Shreeni for above info)

    KTM Duke 200: Stock setup: 14/43 on a .520 chain pitch. 110 chain links.

    To overgear your Duke 200,
    1. use a 36 teeth sprocket from P220 DTSi. (confirmed, thanks joelkraju)
    2. use a 37, 38, 39, 40 teeth sprocket from P220 DTS Fi, P200 older, P180 UG4 or Karizma. (not confirmed, but these sprockets should definitely fit I think.)

    ============
    Gearing Commander Website: Guys, we can find final ratio by using any combo of sprockets by using (Rear no. of teeth/Front no. of teeth) formula.
    But what if we change a lot of things like, both sprockets, rear tyres, Primary Ratio, rear rim, etc.?
    Fear not, there is a solution. You can find out all about the gearing even before trying it out. Plus it has stock info on gearing of many bikes. You can use the below website for calculating gearing by entering everything that affects gearing:->

    Gearing Commander: Motorcycle Speed, RPM, Chain & Sprockets Calculator (Credits: Sir Old Fox)


    ============
    I'll be adding more info. Please suggest improvements to this topic by sending me PM's/ posting here. --Samarth
    Last edited by Samarth 619; 10-26-2018 at 04:21 PM. Reason: updated info/ images.

  2. #2
    Rusted Aryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    New Delhi/ Shillong
    Posts
    18,673
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Topic Approved.
    ...in search of that perfect world - My Travel Blog :)

  3. #3
    Moderator Samarth 619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rajasthan
    Posts
    4,801
    Blog Entries
    4
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smile

    Sprocket Manual

    This image will help you interpret the information given:-->




    You can open only the relevant images yourself, to gain the specific info you need (Right cl!ck, Choose "Open in new Tab/ Window"):-->

    Hero Honda

    https://image.ibb.co/cXhGz7/Photo1196.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/gNUUK7/Photo1199.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/ewoZmn/Photo1197.jpg

    Bajaj

    https://image.ibb.co/foa3e7/Photo1198.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/kVFEmn/Photo1201.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/busumn/Photo1202.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/bS3dCS/Photo1203.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/k0EJCS/Photo1204.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/f2ddCS/Photo1206.jpg

    Pulsar 180 UG4 has 14/39 on chain pitch .520. Chain Links = 104.

    Pulsar 220 DTS Fi (old model) has 14/37 on chain pitch .520. Chain Links = ?.

    Pulsar 220 DTSi has 14/36 on chain pitch .520. Chain Links = ?.

    KTM

    KTM Duke 200 has 14/43 on chain pitch .520. Chain links = ?.

    KTM Duke 390 has 14/45 on chain pitch .520. Chain links = ?.

    Kawasaki Ninja 250

    Sprocket size 14/45 .520. Chain links =?


    TVS Motors

    https://image.ibb.co/gKsumn/Photo1208.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/hQ9ksS/Photo1207.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/iPsumn/Photo1209.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/cST6z7/Photo1212.jpg

    Apache RTR 160 has 13/44 on chain pitch .428. Chain Links = ?.

    Apache RTR 180 has 14/46 on chain pitch .428. Chain Links = ?.

    Yamaha

    https://image.ibb.co/hPgn6n/Photo1211.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/hyJ6z7/Photo1214.jpg

    FZ16 and FZ-S have 14/40 on chain pitch .428. Chain links = ?.

    YZF R15 v1 has 14/42 on chain pitch .428. Chain links = ?.

    YZF R15 v2 has 15/47 on chain pitch .428. Chain links = ?.

    Yezdi/ Suzuki/ Honda

    https://image.ibb.co/mY0asS/Photo1213.jpg

    Rajdoot

    https://image.ibb.co/d0sYe7/Photo1215.jpg

    LML

    https://image.ibb.co/bxBRz7/Photo1216.jpg

    Enfield

    https://image.ibb.co/eE2c6n/Photo1218.jpg

    Kinetic/ Hero Motors

    https://image.ibb.co/jNuqRn/Photo1217.jpg

    --------------
    Mopeds

    https://image.ibb.co/eXYjmn/Photo1220.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/ijuDe7/Photo1219.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/jr7c6n/Photo1221.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/cvDvsS/Photo1222.jpg

    Miscellaneous Rolon Info

    https://image.ibb.co/hzEeK7/Photo1223.jpg

    https://image.ibb.co/mWqx6n/Photo1224.jpg


    https://image.ibb.co/mOZJCS/Photo1205.jpg

    -------------
    Cautions to be exercised while using the guide:-->

    1. In this guide, wrong information MAY be given about Bikes having multiple different updates, like CBZ, Ambition, Unicorn, etc.

    2. Be very careful with names. For example, "FAZER" means the Yamaha FAZER 125cc model that was sold few years back, not the half faired FZ, ok?

    3. Please contribute to this page by adding new chain sprocket info for new bikes like GS 150R, Unicorn Dazzler, etc,
    Last edited by Samarth 619; 04-12-2018 at 10:32 PM. Reason: updated the expired links..
    kamal0582, Vykier and xpranav like this.

  4. #4
    Rusted
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Thane
    Posts
    439
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Nice info...

    but this....

    " Xbhp.com, a site that made me the Biking Genius in my friends group"


    wtf dude....heheheahhah..just fell off my chair laughin...

    \v/
    peace..

  5. #5
    Rusted leon_nerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brampton, ON, Canada
    Posts
    791
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Can you please explain what is meant by VS Kit, V Kit, Regular Kit and CSB Kit?

    Also, will it be allowed for people to post their experiences about sprocketing here in this thread? The decision lies upto the owner and mods of this thread.
    Enna Rascalla. Mind it !!!

  6. #6
    Rusted
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Thane
    Posts
    439
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    yaar am really lookin forward for some first hand experiences of ppl who have got sprocketing done...

    anyone from mumbai????
    Last edited by me is rossi; 12-26-2008 at 04:02 PM.

  7. #7
    Moderator Samarth 619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rajasthan
    Posts
    4,801
    Blog Entries
    4
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smile

    Open Chain Covers on regular bikes

    About 1 year ago, I removed the full chain cover (metal) and instead used an open chain cover made of plastic. I thought it would save some weight and look great too. See the image below:



    Bike: Bajaj Pulsar 180 UG3

    Chain Cover used: JN181204 (Original Bajaj Part) costing Rs. 74.

    Fitting: Had to create a hole (on chain cover) on one end to fit it. Since it was plastic, creating this hole was easy.

    I can say that even on ordinary chains, you can remove the chain case safely, but you should:

    1. search for a good open chain cover. Most of the dirt gets hurled on the top of the running chain, while the bike is in motion.
    Don't skip this. You must find a decent cover above the chain.
    If you are unsure, its better to leave the upper part of stock chain cover intact than to completely expose it to dirt.

    2. purchase a good quality chain spray. I cleaned my chain using old engine oils, but I don't recommend it to others.
    Every month, first clean the dirt on the chain using a cloth. Then, apply the chain spray/ formulation on the bottom end of the running chain...

    CAUTION: Don't clean/ oil the chain while the wheel is rotating too fast, or its rotating on engine power, while on main stand.
    One may lose a finger by accident if he's not careful.

    3. Warn the ladies who sit on your bike, to keep their clothes, etc. out of the chain's reach. My sister's chunni (or dupatta, whatever it is) got entangled in the chain when I was leaving my home, barely at 5 kmph. It got torn. Fortunately, nobody was hurt.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Samarth 619; 04-12-2018 at 10:14 PM.

  8. #8
    Moderator Samarth 619's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Rajasthan
    Posts
    4,801
    Blog Entries
    4
    Mentioned
    43 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Chain Pitch:

    Chain pitch is the difference between a chain's two adjoining links. Similarly, Sprockets also have a pitch which is the distance between their two adjoining teeth.

    Let's take a Chain pitch number: .428 as an example.

    Here, the 1st digit 'x', is the pitch/ distance between 2 links, in terms of 'x/8 inch'. So, a .428 chain belongs to "4" pitch series, and has a 4/8 or 1/2 inch pitch. (x=4)

    The next 2 numbers (like "28") denote the sprocket width/ fatness which the chain will comply with too, in terms of distance between inner plates. or Roller width, as you can see in the diagram below.

    A chain ending in ‘20’ measures around 6.35mm between the plates.
    If the number ends in ‘28’, the dimension is around 7.94mm.
    If the number ends in ‘30’ or ‘32’, the width is around 9.53mm.

    Because wider chains are typically stronger as well, the 2nd & 3rd digits also indicate a chain’s strength, relative to other chains with the same pitch.
    See the image below for clarification:



    --
    In your Bikes: Remember, your entire setup (both sprockets and chain) HAVE TO be on the same chain pitch. You can't fit a .520 pitch sprocket(s) on a .428 chain, or vice versa.
    For example: If you choose .428 pitch for your bikes, your chain and both the sprockets should be .428 only.



    =================================================
    =================================================
    Chain Length:

    Fortunately, choosing the right chain for your bike is very easy. Apart from Chain pitch, only one more parameter exists, that is overall chain length.
    The formula to calculate chain length is:--> Chain length in inches = (Chain pitch's first digit) X No. of links / 8

    So, if P180 UG4's chain is .520 pitch with 104 links, the chain length is: 5 x 104/ 8 = 65 inches. (5 feet 5 inches)

    And, if P180 UG3's chain is .428 pitch with 124 links, the chain length is: 4 x 124/ 8 = 62 inches.

    --
    In your bikes: First Calculate the chain length of your stock bike's chain. See that the sprocket teeth are not changed by much. Then, see the new chain's length and compare them.

    Since, every bike's chain can be adjusted, the new chain could be slightly longer by 1-2 inches maximum, depending on each bike's adjustment limit and sprocket size difference before and after. But, the new chain should NOT be smaller in any case or your kit purchase could be wasted, unless the new sprockets are far smaller too.

    For example, if your stock chain length is 62 inches, and the new chain is 63 inches (with nearly the same sprocket sizes, irrespective of pitch), then the chain can be adjusted and used.

    (This rule is applicable, assuming that major sprocket changes are not done.)

    Chain can be adjusted by loosening and moving a knob on the swingarm, as shown in Post #1 above (See the rear sprocket example).
    Last edited by Samarth 619; 04-12-2018 at 10:36 PM.

  9. #9
    CommuTOURer satyenpoojary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    On road
    Posts
    6,784
    Blog Entries
    1
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Samarth 619 View Post
    Guys, The ADMIN, Mr. Sundeep has totally ignored me .... 2 Messages sent & no response...


    People like Praful, Aryan, etc. please send his Majesty a PM, so that he pays some attention & all can be benefitted!

    Damn! How am I supposed to post a 700 KB Stuff??? Why can't he respond to me??
    Take a chill pill dude... why you getting so agitated, why dont you use other free upload sites like 4shared.com, megaupload etc?

    You think Sunny only has this thing to manage? Duh! Chill man!

    Edit: post it somewhere and link it here... shimple!
    Last edited by satyenpoojary; 12-28-2008 at 02:57 PM.
    Super CommuTOURer - Talk less, Ride more

    .: FB :.|.: TW :.|*Do Not Click!*|I
    follow POWERDRIFT:.

    #Give thy opinion, write em, dont throw em
    #Everyone errs, accept it, defending/cribbing about it only makes it worse
    #Dont defend a manufacturer as if you work for them
    #Write. Think. If relevant hit submit. If not hit yourself
    #Be kind in your choice of words, you never know who would make you gulp em
    Satyen Poojary

  10. #10
    Rusted Akshay.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ambala/Chandigarh
    Posts
    267
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Samarth 619 View Post
    Guys, The ADMIN, Mr. Sundeep has totally ignored me .... 2 Messages sent & no response...


    People like Praful, Aryan, etc. please send his Majesty a PM, so that he pays some attention & all can be benefitted!

    Damn! How am I supposed to post a 700 KB Stuff??? Why can't he respond to me??
    Ever heard of Rapid share and megaupload?

Page 1 of 134 123451151101 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. the most beautiful bike in the world
    By bikecrazy in forum General Biking Discussion
    Replies: 117
    Last Post: 09-03-2015, 10:15 PM
  2. World's First Comet GT250 running on LPG
    By TheRedPill in forum Coffee Lounge:Off Topic
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 10-03-2008, 12:38 AM
  3. xBhp World Peace Drive to Shimla
    By Bunny in forum xBhp Offline Meets(G2G's)
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 11-19-2004, 12:57 AM
  4. great log of a couple's world trip on bikes
    By skorpion1 in forum The Tourer
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-29-2004, 11:14 AM
  5. World Record Stoppie
    By heman in forum General Biking Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-15-2004, 10:38 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •