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Thread: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

  1. #41
    Rusted siddharthsure's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Oil filter will be sticking out like this in ninja??? I mean even the stock oil filter?? If yes, where will the oil enter and go out?? Sorry for this noob question.... I really want to know


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    Its better to sweat than bleed!! "AGATT "

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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    ^^^ here is some reading for you... All About Oil Filters
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Quote Originally Posted by abhimanyu31 View Post
    ^^^ here is some reading for you... All About Oil Filters
    Nice... Your stock filter has holes for Inlet and outlet....But FLO has only one hole at the center...That is the reason i asked that question
    Its better to sweat than bleed!! "AGATT "

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Here is a photograph of the assembled oil filter (from the internet as I didn't take one of the same). As you will note when the core is assembled into the casing there are 3 slots created between the outer diameter of the core and the inner diameter of the case. These slots are intake orifices and the one hole in the centre is the outlet orifice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by siddharthsure View Post
    Nice... Your stock filter has holes for Inlet and outlet....But FLO has only one hole at the center...That is the reason i asked that question
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Hey abhimanyu31 , this is an excellent thread. Not just because of the mods that you have done but more so because of the way you have explained each and every mod. Thank you!
    Sid85 likes this.

  6. #46
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    Default Installation of All Balls Tapper Roller Bearings

    Installation of All Balls Tapper Roller Bearings

    After having changed the stock wheels to ultra lightweight Brembo Marchesini (detailed in previous posts) it became necessary to upgrade the suspension to account for the reduced un-sprung weight.

    After considering all the options available to us, we came up with a detailed game plan for making the required changes. Considering the deficit of height difference (detailed in the post for wheel change) created by using Metzelers, we decided that the front suspension assembly needs to be attended to first in order to address this deficit.

    Considering all the pros and cons we have decided to change the complete internals of the fork and convert the stock damper type fork to cartridge one. The forks will have custom made springs and dampening rates, which take into account the reduced un-sprung weight, my weight, riding style, etc.

    However, before we start working on the forks it was necessary to address the weakest link in the whole front assembly i.e. bearings for steering cone set. We decided to install tapper roller bearings in lieu of the stock ball bearings. There is nothing wrong with my stock steering cone set. It is working just fine. However, the steering cone set is another part where the bean-counting accountants have made their presence felt. While ball bearing type cone set is a cheaper option, which gets the work done, it is not the best of solutions.

    In the ball bearing solution the loads are applied radially to the balls and race cup thus creating highly concentrated load spots on the balls. While this works just fine under most conditions, they tend to fail early compared to other solutions. Most of you will have replaced the cone set of your bikes within a couple of years of buying your bike. I suspect many of you may have done this within months of getting your bikes.

    The problem with the ball bearing application is that while the radial loads are taken care of by the bearings, they combine with axial loads that create flex and twisting loads on the ball and race cups.

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    Typical Ball Bearing. Note the contact area between the balls and the races.

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    Example of thrust type ball bearing used in stock steering cone set.

    As a solution most superbikes mount tapper roller bearing in their steering. In tapper roller bearing the angle of the tapper allows the bearing to support radial and axial loads. These bearings support much higher loads by distributing the load across the greater surface area offered by the rollers and their races. Thus this solution offers better suspension feedback during braking, reduced play/flex and also delivers smoother steering vis--vis ball bearings.

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    Cutaway of tapper roller bearing. Note the enhanced load area vis-a-vis the ball bearing above.


    Therefore, considering the above factors we thought it prudent to improve and strengthen the weakest link in the front assembly.

    The other problem that most of us face after replacing the steering cone set is the fact that it never feels like the original fitting. This due to the fact that during production, the chassis is completely bare and the races of the cone set are installed with jigs and fixtures with the correct amount of recommended force. However, when installation is done at the service center no jigs or fixtures are used. Many a times I have seen races being hammered into the chassis. Without fail this gives me a near heart attack to see such abuse being done to something so crucial. Whenever, I speak to so called service engineers, I get a blank look and a standard reply, “This is how it is always done!” Bearing installation is a science and not a hatchet job. Check any of the ball bearing manufactures website and you will find elaborate instructions on how their bearings should be fitted. I shared my concerns with Vikram of Motozone. He assured me that the mounting of the bearings will be done with proper jigs and fixtures and correct amount of force will be applied at all times during installation. Even if he did not have right fixture, he would make one before starting the work. He also showed me the special hydraulic press that he had for such applications.

    Thus started the hunt of tapper roller bearings. We started looking for bearings from reputed manufactures like SKF, Timken, NMB, etc. However, it seemed that none of these manufactures had the bearings with the required dimensions. After a fruitless search, we came upon a small company called All Balls Bearings in the U.S. that specially manufactures bearings for conversions like the Ninja 300. Therefore, a set of tapper roller bearings were ordered from All Balls Bearings.

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    The All Balls Bearings packing.

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    Contents of the packing. 2 sets of bearings and dust covers.

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    The bearings, races and dust covers.

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    The lower bearing being mounted on to the steering stem and lower triple clamp. Note the hydraulic press used to ensure that even pressure is applied across the race collar while mounting the bearing.

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    Measurements were carried out at various points of the installation to ensure that the mounting of the bearing is within specified parameters.

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    The outer race of the lower bearing being mounted into the steering stem with the hydraulic press.

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    Measurements being taken of the installed outer race.

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    Similarly the upper bearing outer race after installation.

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    Installation of the bearings completed. The complete installation took 8 hours!

    Another interesting thing that was found was the misalignment of the forks. Kawasaki recommends that the forks be 10 millimetres above the upper triple clamp i.e. the distance from the top of the fork to the top surface of the top triple clamp should be 10 mm. Much to our surprise we found that the left fork was 9 mm whereas the right one was 10 mm. That is a huge difference. This was corrected before completing the final assembly.

    Once again I would like to thank Vikram and Vijay of Motozone for taking so much of trouble to do the job right.
    Last edited by abhimanyu31; 06-07-2014 at 04:52 PM.
    sibun, amitmalve, rylan and 9 others like this.
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  7. #47
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    Default Installation of Translogic Micro Dash 3 digital dashboard.

    Installation of Translogic Micro Dash 3 digital dashboard.

    I have always been very fascinated by digital dashboards. Some how I have always connected with them and known that they were the future. My first introduction to digital dashboards was when I saw the Multi Control Display Units (MCDU) in a photograph of an F16 fighter jet cockpit in Flight magazine in the 1980s. I couldn’t help but think that one day such display units will be a part of all automobiles.

    Fast forward to 2001, in an article by Road Racing World magazine giving the inside details of the then all-new M1 (OWM1) where I see the photograph of the first all digital display and I go like ‘Oh My God, this is way better than a Penthouse Centerfold!!!’.

    The M1 digital display has a unique place in the Moto Gp history. The relationship between Valentino Rossi and Masao Furusawa (the creator of long bang M1) is almost legendary. Their partnership and relationship was as important as Rossi’s relationship with Jeremy Burgress. In his biography “What if I had never tried it”, Rossi narrates a small but significant incident, which helped, cement his relationship with Furusawa and Yamaha. When Rossi visited the Yamaha garage he mounted the M1 to checkout its riding position. One of the things that Rossi was impressed with was the large LCD digital display. Furusawa jested that it was there to watch movies on the long straight stretches during races. Rossi was in splits and an immediate bond was formed between Rossi and Furusawa, a bond that led to 4 world championships.

    The legendary M1 dash!
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    Magneti Marelli digital dash on Tom Sykes/ Loris Baz's WSBK ZX10!
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    Once again fast forward to 2012. I am going through an edition of Performance Bike Magazine and I see an advertisement for the Translogic Micro dash mounted on the Ninja 250. Once again I go like ‘Wow, someday I will install this on my bike’. The digital dash was at the back of my mind since that day. Even on the day I went to book Ninja san a voice at the back of my mind was prodding me ‘you know that digital dash that you had seen, now you will not rest till you get’. My fate was sealed the day I booked Ninja San.

    Yet I resisted the temptation, saying to myself that the stock was good enough and I did not need a digital dash. However, as fate would have it, during a recent visit to the Porsche factory at Leipzig, I saw a similar dash mounted on the steering of factory Porsche factory racing GT2 car and to make the story short I knew that I was going to get the Translogic Digital dash. Hence, a phone call was made to a friend in U.K. to order the dash so that it would be ready by the time I reached there. In addition to the dash, universal brackets and lugs were also ordered to facilitate the mounting of the dash.

    The Translogic digital dash comes packed with all the things you will require to install it (however, it is highly recommended that you order the universal brackets and lugs).
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    The box consists of the dash well packed in aluminum covered bubble warp.

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    The box also consists of a instruction manual, wire stripper, Velcro sticker pads, pink PVC connectors, cable ties, speed sensor along with its mounting bracket, selector switch, thermostat and 2 wiring looms.

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    Once again I contacted Vikram of Motozone for his help in installing the dash. Vikram requested that I send him a copy of the instruction manual and stock wiring schematics to study them in advance so that he could plan the installation.

    A week later I got a call from Vikram letting me know that he was ready to do the installation and that I could come over on that weekend to install the dashboard.

    The installation started with removing the stock meter.

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    The instrument cover housing requires a slight modification for the dash to fit properly. Vikram used a high speed Dermel drill to create the correct shape for the modified slot.

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    He then mounted the universal mounting brackets and lugs on to the dash.

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    The dash was then mounted on to the instrument cover housing. Vikram took his time to adjust and align the dash properly on to the instrument cover housing.

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    It was now time to start the serious installation part. Vikram first cut the stock wiring harness connector. He cut the wiring harness with about one inch of wiring on the connector. This will enable us to use the connector again if we ever want to revert back to stock dash.

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    After cutting the wiring loom, each wire was identified as per the wiring schematics and then double checked using a multi-meter.

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    Once the wires were isolated and identified, they were crimped into the PVC connectors.

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    The selector switch was then mounted on the left handle bar.

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    The wiring from the harness supplied with the dash was then crimped and connected to the isolated wires. A hot air gun was then used to heat shrink the connectors.

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    The tachometer wire was then soldered to the ignition coil signal wire. The supplied thermostat was mounted on the bike’s thermostat housing.

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    Installation of the thermostat. Note the mounting. Although the system is not inside the engine block, the Micro Dash is sophisticated enough to compensate for the temperature differential and show very accurate temperature readings.

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    Next the speed sensor was mounted.

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    The final wiring was connected and the dash was mounted on to the bike. When the dash was first switched on it went into the demo mode as can be seen in the below photo.

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    The dash now needs to be programed. As you can see from the above photo the dash consist of lot of information. In the center is the gear indicator. The gear indicator uses a combination of engine rpm and rear wheel speed to show the correct gear. There is a voltmeter, temperature meter and oil indicator. There is also an engine rpm meter, bar graph and programmable LED shift lights at the top of the meter.

    The gear indicator and the speed indicator require a dyno to tune. Since we did not have a dyno available the speed indicator was tuned using a GTech data logger and the gear indicator was programmed by running the bike on long empty stretch of road.

    I had mentioned in one of my previous post how using a different size tyre and final gearing was increasing the speedo error. I had also mentioned that I would require sourcing a speedo healer to correct the error. With the programmable speed indicator that problem is now taken care of. No matter what size of tyre I use or what gearing I use, once I program the speedo to a known speed of 30mph/48 kmph it will indicate the correct speed from there on.

    Getting a handy temperature meter led to some interesting observations. Initially when the bike is started the auto choke will remain on till the coolant temperature reaches 60 degree Celsius. On the highway running at 70 to 80 kmph on a hot day where ambient temperatures can reach 40 degree Celsius, the engine will happily run between 88 degrees to 92 degrees Celsius. However, if you are standing still in the traffic, the temperature will shoot up to 110 degrees before the cooling fan kicks in and brings it down to around 100 degrees.

    On the whole, while not complicated the installation took more than 10 hours to do it in a proper manner. I am extremely happy with the way things turned out. Once again thanks to Motozone and Vikram for their immense help.
    Last edited by abhimanyu31; 07-16-2014 at 06:02 PM. Reason: corrections and adding of photos
    Only a biker knows why a dog sticks his head out of a car window.

    Multum in Parvo - Much in Little

    "Yes, it is FAST! No, you CAN'T ride it!" - http://www.xbhp.com/talkies/general-...a-300-san.html

  8. #48
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Abhimanyu would request you to share the start up video showing the console snd if possible while on the move too.
    Fare thee well xBhp, All the best for being the biggest name in corporate world

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  9. #49
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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Awesome mods mate..
    If possible can you edit your first post with all the mods you have made and their website of purchase?? It would help others.
    classic.infinity likes this.

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    Default Re: Making of Kawasaki Ninja 300 San

    Wow. Although I am fond of analog Tachos, but boy this one is cool. I never knew that such kind of a thing is available for normal bikes as well.
    Thanks for sharing.
    Rachit K Dogra

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